Walter Hopp

Director of Graduate Admissions, Associate Professor of Philosophy

Ph.D., University of Southern California

Interests: Phenomenology, Epistemology, Philosophy of Mind, Metaphysics

Walter Hopp joined the department in 2005 after receiving his B.A. from Colorado State University and his Ph.D. from the University of Southern California. His main areas of interest are in Phenomenology, Epistemology, and the Philosophy of Perception. He has recently completed a book-length project in which he defends a broadly Husserlian account of the relationship between thought and perception. He has taught courses in British Empiricism, Epistemology, Existentialism, and Phenomenology. You can find out more, and read penultimate versions of his articles, at his homepage: http://people.bu.edu/hopp/.

Book

Perception and Knowledge: A Phenomenological Account. Cambridge University Press, 2011.

Articles

‘No Such Look: Problems with the Dual Content Theory,’ forthcoming in Phenomenology and the Cognitive Sciences.

‘The (Many) Foundations of Knowledge,’ forthcoming in D. Zahavi, ed., The Oxford
Handbook of Contemporary Phenomenology.

‘Perception.’ In S. Luft and S. Overgaard, eds., The Routledge Companion to
Phenomenology (2011), 146-157. New York: Routledge.

‘How to Think about Nonconceptual Content,’ The New Yearbook for Phenomenology
and Phenomenological Philosophy 10 (2010), 1-24.

‘Conceptualism and the Myth of the Given,’ European Journal of Philosophy 17 (2009), 363-385.

‘Husserl, Dummett, and the Linguistic Turn,’ Grazer Philosophische Studien 78 (2009), 17-40.

‘Phenomenology and Fallibility,’ Husserl Studies 25 (2009), 1-14.

‘Reply to Heffernan,’ Husserl Studies 25 (2009), 45-49.

Critical Review of J.N. Mohanty’s The Philosophy of Edmund Husserl, Graduate Faculty Philosophy Journal 29 (2008), 175-184.

‘Husserl, Phenomenology, and Foundationalism,’ Inquiry 51 (2008), 194-216.

‘Minimalist Truth and Realist Truth,’ Philosophia Christi 10 (2008), 87-100.

‘Husserl on Sensation, Perception, and Interpretation,’ Canadian Journal of Philosophy 38 (2008), 219-246.