Course Descriptions Spring 2007

PH100 A1
Introduction to Philosophy
Professor Peter Bokulich
Introduction to the nature of philosophical activity through a careful study of selected great works such as Plato’s Apology, Descartes’ Meditations, Lao Tze’s Tao Te Ching, Pascal’s Pensées, and Nietzsche’s Thus Spoke Zarathustra.

PH150 A1
Introduction to Ethics
Professor Brinkmann
Who ought we to be, what ought we to do, what ought we to strive for? Examination of our obligations to ourselves, to other humans, and to the natural world in light of ethical theory and contemporary problems. Readings from a wide range of texts in philosophical ethics.

PH150 B1
Introduction to Ethics
Professor Hopp
Who ought we to be, what ought we to do, what ought we to strive for? Examination of our obligations to ourselves, to other humans, and to the natural world in light of ethical theory and contemporary problems. Readings from a wide range of texts in philosophical ethics.

PH150 C1
Introduction to Ethics
Professor Keller
Who ought we to be, what ought we to do, what ought we to strive for? Examination of our obligations to ourselves, to other humans, and to the natural world in light of ethical theory and contemporary problems. Readings from a wide range of texts in philosophical ethics.

PH155 A1
Politics & Philosophy
Professor Garrett
The first ten weeks of the course will provide a survey of classic works in political philosophy (including works by Plato, Aristotle, Augustine, Hobbes, Rousseau, Adam Smith, Rawls, Nozick). The remainder of the course will focus on the philosophy of law.

PH160 A1
Reason & Argument
Professor Devlin
A systematic study of the principles of both deductive and informal reasoning, calculated to enhance students’ actual reasoning skills, with an emphasis on reasoning and argumentation in ordinary discourse.

PH160 B1
Reason & Argument
Professor Alisa Bokulich
A systematic study of the principles of both deductive and informal reasoning, calculated to enhance students’ actual reasoning skills, with an emphasis on reasoning and argumentation in ordinary discourse.

PH245 A1
Philosophy & Religion
Professor Lobel
Introduction to religious thought, exploring the aims of human life, the place of God in the good life, and the role of contemplation and action in the spiritual quest. Readings from Plato, Aristotle, Bible, Upanishads, Bhagavad Gita, Augustine, Maimonides, Ghazzali.

PH247 A1
Chinese Philosophy
Professor Berthrong
An introduction to the Chinese philosophical tradition, including a study of classical Confucianism, Buddhism, Taoism, Mohism, Legalism, and modern developments.

PH249 A1
American Philosophical Tradition
Professor Speight
Is there an American philosophical tradition? What is “American” about it? This course will feature close readings of important works from the history of American philosophy from Jonathan Edwards to Josiah Royce and beyond, with particular stress on the key figures in the transcendentalist and pragmatist movements.

PH259 A1
Philosophy of the Arts
Professor Kestenbaum
Consideration of two topics central to the philosophical analysis of music and painting: (1) the distinctive character of aesthetic experiences afforded by these arts and, (2) the nature of appreciation and criticism of these arts. Attendance at concerts, galleries, and museums is expected; planning for these activities will occur early in the course.
Prerequisite: one philosophy course or sophomore standing.

PH260 A1
Knowledge and Reality
Professor Dahlstrom
The purpose of this course is to introduce students to three approaches – an ancient approach and two more recent approaches – to the problem of determining our cognitive access to reality. These three approaches diverge from one another by centering that access, respectively, in the soul, the brain, or the body. In the first part of the course, we shall begin with a review of seminal ancient writings on knowing and the nature of the soul by means of which, on this view, we know. Attention then shifts to contemporary attempts to make sense of knowing as well as other mental phenomena in strictly neurobiological terms. In the final portion of the course we shall turn to phenomenological attempts to ground our access to reality in our embodied condition.

PH266 A1
Mind, Brain, and Self
Professor Webb
Philosophical introduction to cognitive science. A consideration of the historical and intellectual background from which cognitive science has emerged, as well as the philosophical issues concerning the mind, brain, and self that arise from contemporary scientific research.

PH271 A1
History of Science
Professor Cao
This course is designed not only for those with scientific background, but also for students whose primary interests and competence are in the humanities and social sciences.

Texts:
Anthony Alioto, A History of Western Science (A)
Barbara Cline, Men Who Made a New Physics (C);
Thomas Kuhn, The Structure of Scientific Revolutions (K);
James Watson, The Double Helix (W).

Considering the centrality of science in our world today, it is essential that students in all fields–including the sciences and engineering as well as the social sciences and the humanities–appreciate both the role of science in society and its nature as an intellectual system. One way to acquire this perspective is through studying the history of science. In this course we will examine key events in the history of science and the historiographical problems as to how the evolution of the history of science is to be explained. The seminal discoveries in the rise of modern science will be surveyed. Special attention will be given to the scientific revolution of the 16th and 17th centuries, both to assess its reaction to ancient modes of thought, and to define the conceptual foundations of subsequent progress in physics and biology. In particular, we shall study the emergence and development of relativity theories and quantum theory in physics, and of evolutionary theory and molecular genetics in biology. In addition, various views on the nature of scientific progress, offered by Sarton, Koyre, Popper, Merton, Kuhn, Lakatos, as well as the social constructivist and the postmodernist, will be briefly examined. Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to understand the nature of the conceptual developments in modern science, to appreciate the character of the interactions between modern science and society, and to appreciate the philosophical, religious, and other cultural issues involving science. The student will thus be in a position to understand how science has become a dominant social, cultural, and intellectual force in the modern world.
Prerequisite: one philosophy course or sophomore standing.

PH 272 A1
Science, Technology, and Values
Professor Alisa Bokulich
Examination of some of the important ways in which science, technology, society, and human values are interconnected. Includes case studies of the social and ethical challenges posed by computer, military, and biological technology.
Prerequisite: Sophomore standing.

PH300 A1
History of Ancient Philosophy
Professor Diamandopoulos
The course will begin with a review of Presocratic thought and its contributions to the founding of natural philosophy. The influence of the Presocratics on the Sophists and Socates will then be probed. Plato’s transformative philosophical vision will subsequently be brought to bear on the whole of Greek philosophy. And the story will end with an interpretation of Aristotle’s pivotal philosophical systematizations, as the culmination of the whole of Greek philosophy. Select citations from Hellenistic thought will underscore, in conclusion, this assessment.
Prerequisite: one philosophy course or sophomore standing.

PH310 A1
History of Modern Philosophy
Professor Kuehn
An examination of seventeenth- and eighteenth-century philosophy from Descartes to Kant, with emphasis on the nature and extent of knowledge. Readings include Descartes, Locke, Spinoza, Berkley, Hume, and Kant.
Prerequisite: one philosophy course or sophomore standing.

PH310 B1
History of Modern Philosophy
Professor Webb
An examination of seventeenth- and eighteenth-century philosophy from Descartes to Kant, with emphasis on the nature and extent of knowledge. Readings include Descartes, Locke, Spinoza, Berkley, Hume, and Kant.
Prerequisite: one philosophy course or sophomore standing.

PH350 A1
History of Ethics
A critical and comparative examination of the ideas of representative moral philosophers from Plato to Nietzsche.
Prerequisite: one philosophy course or sophomore standing.

PH350 B1
History of Ethics
Professor Kestenbaum
Critical examination of central Platonic concepts and their bearing on the ethical theories of John Dewey, Michael Oakeshott, and Iris Murdoch.
Prerequisite: one philosophy course or sophomore standing.

PH350 A1
Logic
Professor Floyd
A study of methods characteristic of modern deductive logic including use of truth tables, Boolean normal forms, models, and indirect and conditional proofs within the theory of truth-functions and quantifiers.
Prerequisite: one philosophy course or sophomore standing.

PH406/606 A1
Aristotle II
Professor Diamandopoulos
A close reading of Aristotle’s writings on practical philosophy (i.e., the Nicomachean Ethics and the Politics) and of his philosophy of art in the Poetics, focusing on the nature of human happiness and the good life, the question of the best form of political government, and the function of art for life.
Prerequisite: CASPH300

PH410/610 A1
Continental Rationalism
Professor Garrett
A close reading of important works by Descartes, Malebranche, Spinoza, and Leibniz.
Prerequisite: (CASPH310) and two other philosophy courses, or consent of instructor.

PH412 HP/A1
Philosophy of the Enlightenment
Professor Griswold
A critical examination of one member of the family of philosophical and political movements that called itself “the Enlightenment.” Our focus is Rousseau, and we will read his major texts (including the Social Contract, Discourses, Emile, and selections from the Confessions and Reveries). We will also consider the replies to Rousseau’s criticisms of the Enlightenment offered by Hume and Smith.
Prerequisite: two other philosophy courses in addition to PH 310 and 350, or consent of instructor. This is a seminar for undergraduate students only.

PH416/616 A1
Hegel
Professor Speight
This course will focus on Hegel’s ethical and political philosophy, beginning with an examination of his famous master/slave dialectic and working through his systematic account of the notions of right, morality and the institutions of ethical life. Texts will include the Phenomenology of Spirit, the Philosophy of Right and Hegel’s essays on concrete historical and political issues.
Prerequisite: (CASPH310) and two courses in philosophy above the 100 level or consent of the instructor.

PH418 A1
Marx and Marxism
Professor Cao
Texts: The Marx-Engels Reader (ME) (ed. Robert C. Tucker)
The Lenin Anthology (L) (ed. Robert C. Tucker)
Western Marxism–A critical Reader (WM) (ed. NLR)
The Retreat of Intellectuals (Socialist Register 1990)(RI) (eds. Ralph Miliband and Leo Panitch)
Marxism in the Postmodern Age (MP) (eds. Antonio Callari, Stephen Cullenberg and carol Biewener)

In this introductory course, Marxism will be treated mainly as a conceptual framework for understanding history and society (including economy, politics and culture), and also as a critique of capitalism and a program of transforming the capitalist society for human emancipation, with an analysis of both its philosophical and ethical presuppositions and its conceptions of a post-capitalist society. The evolution of its theoretical bases, through its three stages (classical Marxism of Marx and Engels; the Soviet orthodoxy and its critics; and contemporary Marxisms) will be critically examined, and its practical (political, economic and cultural) impacts on the historical course since its inception briefly outlined.
Prerequisite: Two courses in philosophy or consent of instructor.

PH419 A1
Nietzsche
Professor Rosen
Reading and discussion of some of Nietzsche’s major works and their influence on twentieth-century thought. Discussions go back to Hegel and forward to Heidegger.
Prerequisite: (CASPH310) and two other philosophy courses, or consent of instructor.

PH426/626 A1
Phenomenology
Professor Hopp
Rigorous examination of foundations of philosophical phenomenology in Husserl and Heidegger.
Prerequisite: (CASPH310) and two other philosophy courses, or consent of instructor.

PH452/652 A1
Ethics of Health Care
Professor Pelluchon
Medicine and health care offer a unique opportunity to explore the nature of humanity and the world and to ask fundamental questions concerning the nature of birth, life, and death, and what it is to be a person. Readings from both classical and contemporary writings in ethics, medicine, law, and public health policy.
Prerequisite: (CASPH350) and two other philosophy courses, or consent of instructor (PH 150 and PH 251 are recommended).

PH453/653 A1
Rawls
Professor Baxter
This course will focus on the most recent work of the late John Rawls — specifically, Political Liberalism and Justice as Fairness: A Restatement. Particular attention will be given to implications for American law and legal theory.

PH462/662 A1
Foundations of Mathematics
Professor Kanamori
Axiomatic set theory as a foundation for, and field of, mathematics: Axiom of Choice, the Continuum Hypothesis, and consistency results.
Prerequisite: CASPH461/661 or consent of instructor.

PH471/671 A1
Ecology in Philosophy and Literature
Professor Brinkmann
An investigation of the philosophical foundations of environmental thought, examining the relationship between man and nature. What is “nature”? How has technology affected our relation to nature? What are our ethical responsibilities toward the earth’s inhabitants?
Prerequisite: junior standing.

PH481/681 A1
Topics in the Philosophy of Law
Professor Simons
Philosophical and policy perspectives on tort law

This seminar will explore a range of topics in tort law (civil liability for harm caused through negligent, intentional, or faultless conduct), with an emphasis on underlying philosophical and policy perspectives. Perspectives will include fairness or corrective justice, distributive justice, economic analysis (and other deterrent theories), and the right to compensation. Among the topics that we are likely to consider are: the Learned Hand test of negligence; private necessity and other strict liability rules; the duty to rescue; victim fault and assumption of risk; causation and loss of a chance; recovery for emotional harm; damages (including compensation for pain and suffering and punitive damages); and regulatory alternatives to tort law.

The texts will include the paperback Torts Stories (Foundation Press), will probably include the paperback: Abraham, The Forms and Functions of Tort Law (Second Ed. Foundation Press), and might include a third paperback collection of articles. Additional articles will also be assigned and available on the courseinfo web site.

Students will be asked to submit short written reaction papers (containing questions and comments about the readings) on a weekly basis, and to write a single draft of a 15-page paper. For those students wishing to satisfy the writing requirement, a 25-page paper is required.
Prerequisite: CASPH455 or consent of instructor.

PH483 A1
Topics in the Philosophy of Religion
Professor Zank
This course will acquaint students with the shift from medieval prophetology, which attempted to reconcile Aristotelian physics and metaphysics with revealed legislation (Averroes, Avicenna, Maimonides, Aquinas) to modern concepts of revelation as both indentical with (Spinoza) and different from nature (freedom, spirit). This will entail an examination of the writings and lectures of Kant, Schleiermacher, Hegel, and Kierkegaard on religion as attempts to reconcile Protestant modes of revelation with the demands of critical epistemology. To discuss the compatibility of modern Protestant solutions to problems first posed by medieval Islamic and Jewish philosophers we will turn to the writings of Leo Strauss.
Prerequisite: junior standing and any one philosophy course from CAS 440-447, or consent of instructor.

PH484/684 A1
Topics of Speculative Philosophy
Professor Dahlstrom
Under what descriptions of willing and freedom, if any, are we justified in regarding instances of willing (choosing, deciding) as free? The purpose of this course is to introduce students to classical and contemporary arguments devoted to the cluster of issues entailed by this question. To this end, I intend to begin the course by attempting to identify distinctive sorts of phenomena that give rise to the problem of the status of volitional freedom and canvassing some pre-eminent treatments of the problem in the history of philosophy. The next part of the course will focus on some standard positions formulated in the last half-century or so. This part of the course will be taken up with sorting out and questioning the plausibility of different versions of compatibilism, libertarianism, hard and soft determinism. In this connection, we shall discuss together specific arguments mounted by B. F. Skinner, Kai Nielsen, Roderick Chisholm, Brand Blandshard, Paul Edwards, Ted Honderich, J. P. Sartre and M. Merleau-Ponty. The final segment of the course is devoted to more recent discussions of the incompatibility of free will and determinism, the purported significance of alternative possibilities, and the implications of the various approaches to volitional freedom for the concept of agency. Among the writers whose work we shall consult in this regard are Peter van Inwagen, Daniel Dennett, Harry Frankfurt, and Susan Wolf.

Required text:
Robert Kane (ed.). Free Will. Malden, MA: Blackwell, 2001 (ISBN 9780631221029)

PH486 A1
Topics in Knowledge, Language, and Logic
Professor Hintikka
Topic for Spring 2007: Conceptual History. Critical examination of the history of a number of central philosophical concepts, including being and its varieties, existence, identity, logic, world, creation, form, function, law of nature, chance, induction, intuition and the so-called principle of plenitude.
Prerequisite: any one philosophy course from CAS PH 460-468, or consent of instructor.

PH811 A1
Topics in the Philosophy of Kant I
Professor Kuehn
Course description is not currently available.

PH854 A1
Seminar in Political Philosophy
Professor Keller
A study of foundational issues in political morality, built around four concepts: the good life, equality, rights and freedom.

PH871 A1
Philosophy of Science
Professor Hintikka
The aim of the course is to clarify the credentials and implications of each position (thus provide students a solid ground for participating in wider cultural debates on rationality and relativism), and to have a better understanding of the recent history and current status of philosophy of science (which is part of necessary training for professional philosophers), through a careful examination of the structure of the arguments adopted by each position in dealing with various issues.

PH880 A1
Topics in Philosophy I
Professor Floyd
An intensive study of Wittgenstein’s Philosophical Investigations. Themes covered include the nature of concept-possession, the scope and character of logic, Wittgenstein’s criticisms of mentalism and various forms of psychologism, questions about what it is to follow a rule, to understand a language, and to express a thought.

PH883 A1
Topics in Philosophy
Professor Rosen
A continuation of the previous semester (Nicomachean Ethics).

PH994 A1
Philosophy Proseminar
Professor Speight