Course Descriptions Fall 1998

CAS PH 100
PHILOSOPHICAL INQUIRY
Professor Rosen
An introduction to philosophy
Required text: Aristotle’s Nicomachean Ethics.

CAS PH 110
GREAT PHILOSOPHERS
Professor Ferrarin
Introduction to some basic questions of human existence, with particular reference to the relationship between man and nature, between the individual and the political domain; the soul and the passions; the definition of virtue and of ethics; morality and freedom.

CAS PH 150 A1
INTRODUCTION TO ETHICS
Professor Fried
The course provides a systematic introduction to the major questions in moral thought, for example, is there any absolute moral standard or are all values relative? Is morality necessarily dependent upon religion? What is the relationship between morality and egoism? Is morality “made up” by people? Is the morally right action the one that achieves the best outcome, or the one that is in accordance with conscience or with duty?

CAS PH 150 B1
INTRODUCTION TO ETHICS
Professor Dahlstrom
A systematic and historical inquiry into differing accounts of the good life, alternating lectures with discussions of selected texts.

CAS PH 150 C1
INTRODUCTION TO ETHICS
Professor Griswold
The course provides a systematic introduction to the major questions in moral thought, for example, is there any absolute moral standard or are all values relative? Is morality necessarily dependent upon religion? What is the relationship between morality and egoism? Is morality “made up” by people? Is the morally right action the one that achieves the best outcome, or the one that is in accordance with conscience or with duty?

CAS PH 155
POLITICS AND PHILOSOPHY
Professor Cahoone
An introduction to Western political philosophy using both historical and contemporary sources. The focus is on the background and conflicting interpretations of modern democracy.

CAS PH 160 A1
REASONING & ARGUMENTATION
Professor Hintikka
A systematic study of the principles of both deductive and informal reasoning, with an emphasis on reasoning and argumentation in ordinary discourse, and on their strategies. The aim of the course is to train the student in the skills of argument analysis, argument construction, and argument evaluation.
Textbook: Hintikka and Bachman, What if…? Toward Excellence in Reasoning.

CAS PH 160 B1
REASONING & ARGUMENTATION
Professor Janssen
A systematic study of the principles of both deductive and informal reasoning, with an emphasis on reasoning and argumentation in ordinary discourse, and on their strategies. The aim of the course is to train the student in the skills of argument analysis, argument construction, and argument evaluation.
Textbook: Hintikka and Bachman, What if…? Toward Excellence in Reasoning and Weston, A Rulebook for Arguments.

CAS PH 160 C1
REASONING & ARGUMENTATION
Professor Devlin
A systematic study of the principles of both deductive and informal reasoning, with an emphasis on reasoning and argumentation in ordinary discourse, and on their strategies. The aim of the course is to train the student in the skills of argument analysis, argument construction, and argument evaluation.
Textbook: Hintikka and Bachman, What if…? Toward Excellence in Reasoning.

Prerequisite: one philosophy course or sophomore standing

CAS PH 248
EXISTENTIALISM
Professor Kestenbaum
Analysis of existentialism as a movement or orientation in contemporary philosophy. Topics include contingency and the grounds for belief and value; depth, superficiality, and the intense life; commitment and open-mindedness; tragedy and the healthy self; boredom, anxiety, and adventure; and existentialism as a philosophy of the possible.

CAS PH 251
MEDICAL ETHICS
Professor Grodin
This course reviews the nature and scope of moral dilemmas and problematic decision making in medicine and health care. After this survey of ethical theory, the course focuses on a broad range of ethical concerns raised by the theory and practice of medicine: the nature of health, disease and illness; rights, access and the limits of health care; the physician-patient relationship; truthtelling and confidentiality. Through a series of case studies, the course examines specific topics: the Bioethics movement; human experimentation; the role of institutional review boards; the concept and exercise of informed, voluntary consent; abortion, reproduction, genetic counseling and screening; euthanasia, death and dying; ethics committees; international and cross cultural perspectives.

CAS PH 254
POLITICAL PHILOSOPHY
Professor Garrett
This course will introduce central themes in political philosophy by examining the emergence of classical liberalism and its relation to divine-right sovereignty and republicanism. In this context we will discuss natural right, natural law, contractualism, and the roles of religion and education in a polity. Authors to be discussed will include Machiavelli, Bodin, Hobbes, Locke, and Spinoza.

CAS PH 265
MIND AND MACHINES
Professor Webb
Additional Prerequisite: logic or some mathematical background, or consent of instructor.
This course examines the efforts of artificial intelligence to model the human mind and explain human thought by means of suitably programmed computers. Attention is given to the historical and mathematical origins of such efforts, as well as the main psychological and philosophical assumptions on which they depend.
Requirements: mid-term and final examinations.
Text: What Computers Can’t Do by Dreyfus; Minds and Machines edited by Anderson.

CAS PH 270
PHILOSOPHY OF SCIENCE
Professor Cao
Main features of the scientific enterprise will be illustrated by examples in the study of physics, biology, mind and society; the aims of scientific activities; the nature of scientific understanding; scientific procedures; the structure and interpretation of scientific theories; the development of science. Some concepts central to the natural and social sciences will be examined carefully. Controversies among competing schools in the philosophy of science over the objectivity and rationality of the scientific enterprise will also be discussed.
Texts: Martin Goldstein and Inge F. Goldstein, How We Know; Victor F. Weisscopf, Knowledge and Wonder.

CAS PH 300 A1
HISTORY OF ANCIENT PHILOSOPHY
Professor Brinkmann
The course will explore Greek philosophy and will concentrate on its chief representatives: Socrates, Plato, and Aristotle. Platonic dialogues, and major chunks of the Aristotelian corpus will be read with some care. The focus will be philosophical rather than historical, and the emphasis will be on the analysis and interpretation of texts.
Requirements: One medium paper, midterm, final.

CAS PH 300 B1
HISTORY OF ANCIENT PHILOSOPHY
Professor Speight
The course will explore Greek philosophy and will concentrate on its chief representatives: Socrates, Plato, and Aristotle. Platonic dialogues, and major chunks of the Aristotelian corpus will be read with some care. The focus will be philosophical rather than historical, and the emphasis will be on the analysis and interpretation of texts.
Requirements: Three major tests, one medium paper.

CAS PH 310 A1
HISTORY OF MODERN PHILOSOPHY
Professor Michalski
Examination of theories of major seventeenth and eighteenth century philosophers, from Descartes to Kant. Along with their confidence in reason, the Continental Rationalists share a conception of philosophy as a universal discipline whose propositions are derivable from first principles regarded as necessary. The British Empiricists, on the other hand, beginning with Locke’s “historical, plain method,” claim to rely primarily on experience as the basis of their theories of knowledge. There are lessons in all of this that Kant takes to heart.
Requirements: Two papers and final examination.
Texts: R. Cummins, D Owen: Central Readings in the History of Modern Philosophy. Descartes to Kant (Wadsworth, 1992).

CAS PH 350
HISTORY OF ETHICS
Professor Haakonssen
The course provides a wide-ranging history of Western ethics from Plato, Aristotle and the stoics, via medieval thinkers (esp. St. Augustine) to early modern and modern moral philosophers: Hobbes, Hume, Rousseau, Kant, Mill and Nietzsche. We consider such questions as whether morality is invented or discovered? What is the good life? What is the relationship between moral virtue and happiness? What is duty? What is supererogation? What is the relationship between morality and religion?

Undergraduates: Register for 400 level courses
Graduates: Register for 600 level courses

Prerequisite: PH 310 and two other PH courses
Modern & Contemporary Philosophy

CAS PH 410/610
CONTINENTAL RATIONALISM
Professor Garrett
A study of the central ideas, arguments, and concepts of Descartes, Spinoza, and Leibniz. Special attention is paid to the relation of their ideas and concepts to early modern science, as well as to their background in medieval and ancient philosophy.

CAS PH 413/613
KANT
Professor Allison
This course is intendend as an introduction to Kant’s Critique of Pure Reason for advanced undergraduate philosopy majors and graduate students, who wish to gain a deeper understanding of Kant (who do not have sufficient background for the 800 level seminars). Since the Critique of Pure Reason is far too complex of work to study properly, in a single semester, the course will focus on central topics in the Transcendental Aesthetic (space and time) and the Transcendental Analytic (the Metaphysical and Transcendental Deductions, the Schematism, and the Analogies of Experience). Students will be expected to prepare a series of short papers, dealing with aspects of the major topics discussed.
Prerequisite: Philosophy 310 or its equivalent. Those desiring more information are encouraged to consult the instructor.

CAS PH 418/618
MARX AND MARXISM
Professor Cao
In this introductory course, Marxism will be treated mainly as a conceptual framework for understanding history and society (including economy, politics and culture), and also as a critique of capitalism and a program of transforming the capitalist society for human emancipation, with an analysis of both its philosophical and ethical presuppositions and its conceptions of a post-capitalist society. The evolution of its theoretical bases, through its three stages (classical Marxism of Marx and Engels; the Soviet orthodoxy and its critics; and contemporary Marxisms) will be critically examined, and its practical (political, economic and cultural) impacts on the historical course since its inception briefly outlined.

CAS PH 419/619
NIETZSCHE
Professor Michalski
An examination of the work of the nineteenth century German philosopher Friedrich Nietzsche. Our aim will be to gain a perspective on the development of his thought and the range of his concerns.
Requirements: Two papers (10 pp. and 15 pp.), Graduates: 15 pp. and 20 pp.

CAS PH 421/621
FREGE
Professor Dreben
A detailed examination of Frege’s philosophical and logical works.
Required Books: The Foundations of Arithmetic (paperback); The Frege Reader (paperback).

Prerequisite: PH 300, 310, and one other PH course
Philosophy of Mind

CAS PH 443/643
PHILOSOPHY OF MIND
Professor Webb
Issues in contemporary philosophy and psychology reflecting traditional concerns in both fields, whether conceptual or methodological.

Prerequisite: PH 350, and two other PH courses
Philosophy of Value

CAS PH 454/654
COMMUNITY, LIBERTY, AND MORALITY
Professor Cahoone
We will pursue the conflict between public regnition of cultural identity and morality and liberalism’s traditional commitment to toleration, individualism, and governmental neutrality, in the work of contemporary Anglo-American political theory.

CAS PH 457/657
ACTION, INTERPRETATION, AND NARRATIVE
Professor Olson
An exploration of basic issues in hermeneutic philosophy and philosophy of language, including the nature and meaning of mythic-symbolic language, narrative discourse, metaphoric prediction, and deconstruction theory, through a discussion of selected works by the scholars with whom these terms/movements/theories are most directly associated. Primary focus will be upon growth and development of hermeneutic philosophy through a close reading of Hans-Georg Gadamer’s now classic Truth and Method and the background materials that inform it; for example, Aristotle’s On Interpretation, Kant’s Critique of Judgment, Schleiermacher’s Hermeneutics, Heidegger’s Being and Time, and the debate of Bultmann and Jaspers on Christianity and Myth. Paul Ricoeur’s Interpretation Theory, and selected essays by Jacques Derrida will also be considered.

Prerequisite: PH 310, 360, and one other PH course
Philosophy of Language & Logic

CAS PH 463/663
PHILOSOPHY OF LANGUAGE
Professor Hintikka
The most representative problem areas in contemporary philosophy of language are discussed, criticized, and put into a new perspective. They include Frege’s sense-reference theory, quantification and anaphora, theory of truth, the semantics of intensional and epistemic concepts, strategic aspects of language use, identfication and individuation, metaphor, demonstratives and indexicals, discourse and dialogue theory, and selected language disturbances (dyslexia, autism).
CAS PH 467/667
MATHEMATICAL LOGIC
Professor Kanamori
The course begins with a treatment of first-order logic as the basis for mathematical logic and an underlying language for mathematics. The syntax and semantics of quantifiers are analyzed, leading to Gödel’s Completeness Theorem. A sketch is given of Gödel’s Incompleteness Theorem. This leads to Türing’s Halting Problem and the beginnings of the problem of computability. After describing the class of computable functions and Church’s Thesis, the theor is developed through the enumeration and parametrization theorems to Kleene’s Recursion Theorem. Recursive and recursively enumerable sets are then discussed. Throughout, questions of undecidability ultimately related to Gödel’s Incompleteness Theorem provide a driving theme.
Required Texts:Herbert B. Enderton, A Mathematical Introduction to Logic (New York: Academic Press, 1972); and if available, Assaf J. Kfoury, Robert N. Moll, and Michael A. Arbib, A Programming Approach to Computability (New York: Springer-Verlag, 1982).

400 level: Limited to Senior Philosophy Majors
600 level: Open to All Graduate Students

Topics Courses

CAS PH 484/684
TOPICS: SPECULATIVE PHILOSOPHY
Professor Dahlstrom
This course examines the topics of meaning and time in the writings of Husserl and Wittgenstein, together with Jacques Derrida’s critical analysis of the former’s treatment of those topics. Wittgenstein’s Philosophical Investigations and Derrida’s Speech and Phenomena and Edmund Husserl’s Origin of Geometry are examined in conjunction with Husserl’s First and Sixth Logical Investigations, his investigations of internal time-consciousness, and his Experience and Judgment: Investigations in a Genealogy of Logic.

CAS PH 485/685
TOPICS: PHILOSOPHY OF VALUE
Professor K. Haakonssen
This course deals with the Scottish Enlightenment. The emphasis will be on the connection between moral, political, and aesthetic theories of the major Scots thinkers of the eighteenth century, but both the epistemological foundations and the wider enlightenments contexts will be explored. The main figures will be Francis Hutcheson, David Hume, Adam Smith, and Thomas Reid.

The following courses are open to Graduate Students ONLY
Note that courses listed above, bearing a 600 level number, may be taken for graduate credit.

Fall 1998 GRADUATE SEMINARS

GRS PH 801
ANCIENT PHILOSOPHY
Professor Ferrarin
The fundamental problems of Aristotle’s psychology are studied. The topics that will be discussed include Aristotle’s defintition of the soul, the senses, perception, imagination, and the intellect. Although not required, knowledge of Greek is highly hoped for.
Texts: Seminar members are expected to read Parva Naturalia, On the Soul, Posterior Analytics, and relevant portions of other works including Physics and Metaphysics.

GRS PH 802
ANCIENT PHILOSOPHY
Professor Roochnik
A careful reading of Plato’s Republic. Students will have unusually extensive opportunities to write on Plato (e.g., several rough drafts of term papers will be required) and may expect unusually extensive commentary on their written work. Students will be expected to learn and adhere to accepted scholarly standards in their writings, and to read the scholarly literature relevant to their term paper. The final result of the written work should be a highly polished paper, one that may perhaps be used as the basis for a publication. Presentations in class may also be required, and students will be expected to express and defend their presentations.

GRS PH 814
TOPICS IN PHILOSOPHY: KANT
Professor Allison
This is the first part of a two semester seminar dedicated to the close study of Kant’s third Critique and some related writings. The aim will be to gain an understanding of the work as a whole and its place within the “Critical Philosophy.” The first semester will focus mainly on the two Introductions, the Analytic of the Beautiful, the Analytic of the Sublime, and the Deduction of Taste. Students who wish to take only the first semester are free to do so, but no one who is not enrolled for the first semester will be allowed to enroll for the second. Since a prior acquaintance with the Critique of Pure Reason is essential, prospective enrollees should have already taken PH 413/613 or its equivalent. Those who are interested in taking the seminar but are concerned about the adequacy of their preparation are urged to consult with the instructor.

GRS PH 816
PHILOSOPHY OF HEGEL
Professor Brinkmann
A close reading of selected sections from the Encyclopedia of Philosophical Sciences, with particular emphasis on: introduction, the three standpoints of thought with regard to objectivity, introduction to the philosophy of nature and the main body of the philosophy of spirit.

GRS PH 881
TOPICS IN PHILOSOPHY
Professor Rosen
An appropriative interpretation of Book One of Hegel’s Science of Logic that emphasizes the philosophical significance of dialectic for contemporary concerns.