Course Descriptions Spring 2012

CAS PH 100 A1 – Introduction to Philosophy
Prof. P. Bokulich
TR 2:00-3:30

A general introduction to Western Philosophy that will address questions such as the following:

What is the relationship between our ideas and the material world? Might the world be a computer-generated illusion (like in The Matrix)? Can we prove or disprove the existence of God? What is the foundation of mortality? Do facts about right and wrong depend on our particular culture? Do they depend on God? How is the mind related to the brain? Could a computer think? What is consciousness? Do we have free will?

CAS PH 100 B1 – Introduction to Philosophy
Prof. Grey
MWF, 2:00-3:00

Introduction to the nature of philosophical activity through a careful study of selected great works such as Plato’s Apology, Descartes Meditations, Lao Tze’s Te Ching, Pascal’s Pensees, and Nietzsche’s Thus Spoke Zarathustra. Carries humanities divisional credit in CAS.

CAS PH 110 A1 – Great Philosophers
Prof. Bronstein
MWF, 10:00-11:00

This course is an introduction to philosophy through a close study of some of the great works in the history of Western philosophy. Authors may include Plato, Aristotle, Descartes, Rousseau, Kant. The course will cover a broad range of topics, including: virtue, the soul, knowledge, skepticism, the existence of God, the mind-body problem, inequality, the political state, and human nature.

CAS PH 150 A1 – Introduction to Ethics
Prof. Kuehn
TR 11:00-12:30

Who ought we to be, what ought we to do, what ought we to strive for? Examination of our obligations to ourselves, to other humans and to the natural world in light of ethical theory and contemporary problems. Readings from a wide range of texts in philosophical problems. Carries a humanities divisional credit in CAS.

CAS PH 150 B1 – Introduction to Ethics
Prof. Katsafanas
MWF, 11:00-12:00

Are there any objective truths about which actions are good, bad, right, and wrong? If so, how do we discover what these truths are? In the first quarter of the class, we will examine some grounds for doubting that ethical claims can be true. In the remainder of the class, we will study four different types of ethical theory: consequentialism, deontology, social contract theory, and virtue ethics.

CAS PH 150 C1 – Introduction to Ethics
Prof. Star
TR, 12:30-2:00

Who ought we to be, what ought we to do, what ought we to strive for? Examination of our obligations to ourselves, to other humans and to the natural world in light of ethical theory and contemporary problems. Readings from a wide range of texts in philosophical problems. Carries a humanities divisional credit in CAS.

CAS PH 159 A1 – Philosophy and Film
Prof. Garrett
TR, 3:30-5:00

It is easy for us to imagine that someone might confuse a film with “real life,” in fact this has been a plot device in numerous films (for example in Three Amigos). This points to something interesting about film, that we might take it to be real, and invites us to ask further questions. What is it about some kinds of films that they could be confused with reality? Can films be true? Are they fictions in the same sense that a novel is fiction? Will they be superceded, or have they already been superceded, by media, which will take to be more real?

These are just a few of the philosophical questions one can ask about film. Some other questions we will consider are: is it immoral to represent immoral acts in a film (even if the acts have never happened)? Should we understand the combination of sound and visual images as more akin to a symphony, a photograph, neither, or both? Is the horror portrayed in horror films the same thing as the horrors we and others experience in our lives? If not, what is “horror”? What does the way we emotionally respond to films say about our emotional lives and the place or even centrality of emotions in our lives?

Throughout the course stress will be places on thinking about philosophical issues through thinking about film, video, and other moving images as media, as opposed to appraising the philosophical content of particular films. Although we will watch some films in the class, and students will be encouraged to watch films outside of class, the content will mostly focus (pardon the pun) on philosophical questions arising from more general reflections on film.

CAS PH 160 A1 – Reasoning and Argumentation
Prof. A. Bokulich
MWF, 12:00-1:00

Knowing how to think, reason, and argue well is essential for success in all disciplines and in everyday life. The aim of this course is to strengthen and develop your critical thinking skills; you will learn how to make good arguments and how to critically evaluate the arguments of others. This course will emphasize both real everyday examples, such as those drawn from newspaper articles, as well as examples drawn from the sciences. Required Textbook: Merrilee Salmon Introduction to Logic and Critical Thinking. Carries a humanities divisional credit in CAS.

CAS PH 160 B1 – Reasoning and Argumentation
Prof. Webb
TR, 9:30-11:00

A systematic study of the principles of both deductive and informal reasoning, calculated to enhance students’ actual reasoning skills, with an emphasis on reasoning and argumentation in ordinary discourse. Carries a humanities divisional credit in CAS.

CAS PH 223 A1 – Philosophy of Sport
Prof. Roochnik
MWF, 12:00-1:00

By reading a wide variety of material and viewing three films, this course will discuss the following questions:  Why do we love sports?  Do American universities overly emphasize sports?  Should intercollegiate athletes be paid? Should athletes take performance enhancing drugs?  Is competition healthy or destructive?  Should women compete against men? What’s the relationship between sport and work?  What is play?  Are sports fans crazy?  Are great athletes heroes?  Can sport be beautiful?

CAS PH 234 A1 – Wealth, Ethics, and Liberty
Prof. Griswold
MWF, 3:00-4:00

Controversy about the morality of wealth and the drive to acquire wealth has been lively since antiquity. Recent global economic problems have only intensified the debate. This course will examine several of the issues at stake in the controversy, drawing on ancient as well as modern sources. The questions to be discussed include: Is the pursuit of wealth ethically neutral, or is it a sign of greed and thus moral corruption, or is it a commendable effort to improve life? Is the drive to attain wealth “natural”? Given that the free market produces or at least sometimes co-exists with vast inequalities of wealth, is there a duty to remedy them (for example, through redistribution of wealth)? Is significant inequality of wealth morally bad? What are the basic philosophical views about distributive justice? Is a society that is structured so as to promote the creation of wealth especially liable to such ills as the objectification and commodification of the workers, alienation, and social division? What are the fundamental arguments in favor of a free market in classical political economy (Adam Smith in particular) and what are some of the fundamental criticisms of those arguments? Readings from Hume, Adam Smith, Adam Ferguson, Rousseau, Marx, and Mandeville, as well as from classical sources such as the Bible, Plato, and Aristotle, and from contemporary authors. Prerequisites: none. In SMG, the course will fulfill a Level A Humanities elective, a Level B liberal arts elective, a Level C elective, or a Free Elective.

CAS PH 242 A1 – Philosophy of Human Nature
Prof. Kestenbaum
MWF, 11:00-12:00

In disciplines such as economics, history, political science, psychology, sociology, or international relations, one finds explicit and implicit ideas concerning human nature. The same is true of disciplines such as classical studies, English literature, religion, and philosophy. And certainly ideas about human nature are directly or indirectly relevant to many professions: physical and occupational therapy, public relations, theatre studies, painting, journalism, advertising, elementary and secondary education. All these disciplines and professions are related to human nature, sometimes because of what they take for granted about it, and other times because of their own inquiries and reflections about human nature.

As an object of inquiry or as an assumption, as question or answer, we often remark something like: “It’s just human nature.” In view of its presence in such a wide of disciplines and professions, are we wise to say that its just human nature? How simple or complex is human nature? How is it to be understood? How is human nature to be thought?

The course will explore ways in which questions about human nature have received philosophical formulation through analysis of concepts such as attention and the good, illness and disability, spirit, and meaning.

[Likely] Texts

Iris Murdoch, The Sovereignty of Good

Jay Clark and Aura Sanchez Garfunkel, Walk of the Centipede: A Story of One Man’s Journey Through Catastrophic Development

J.W.N. Sullivan, Beethoven: His Spiritual Development

Ernest Becker, The Birth and Death of Meaning

Karl Jaspers, Philosophy of Existence

CAS PH 244 A1 – How Are We to Live? Ethics in Action
Prof. Star
TR, 3:30-5:00

A rigorous, critical approach to a number of difficult ethical questions that arise in everyday life, including questions about life and death, morally responsible healthcare, special duties to family and friends, and the moral status of animals.

CAS PH 245 A1 – Philosophy of Religion
Prof. Lobel
MWF, 1:00-2:00

Explores the aims of human life, the place of God in the good life, the role of contemplation and action in the spiritual quest, interactions between philosophy and religious thought. The course is textual and interactive, using Socratic method: a collective search for truth and understanding. We will read and discuss key passages of each text and explore the larger questions they raise; students will have study questions to guide each reading. Participants will also write short (1 ¼ page) reflection papers, including a final paper reflecting upon the trajectory of the semester: insights, conclusions, new questions to explore. The class will thus engage in an ongoing dialogue about the central questions of the course. Readings will include Plato, Aristotle, the Bible, Tao Te Ching, Bhagavad Gita, Augustine, Maimonides, Ghazali.

CAS PH 247 A1 – Chinese Philosophy
Prof. Berthrong
TR, 12:30-2:00

An introduction to the Chinese philosophical tradition, including a study of classical Confucianism, Buddhism, Taoism, Mohism, Legalism, and modern developments.

CAS PH 248 A1 – Existentialism

Prof. Hopp

TR, 9:30-11:00

The central philosophical and literary figures commonly regarded as existentialists are a divers bunch, but are united in their skepticism concerning the power of traditional philosophical or scientific analysis to render human thought and action intelligible, the value they place on individual authenticity, and the importance they assign to emotionally exceptional states of mind for the full disclosure of human (and even non-human) reality. In this course we will examine works by Kierkegaard, Dostoevski, Nietzsche, Kafka, Camus, and Sartre. We will be especially concerned with what these thinkers have to say about the condition of modern humanity, the ability of science to explain human action, the authority of moral laws, the importance of individual “authenticity,” and the “absurdity” of human life, either with or without God.

CAS PH 253 A1 – Social Philosophy
Prof. Cao
MWF, 2:00-3:00

Through a reading of some selected texts we will examine modern and contemporary theories of society, concerning its nature and the direction of its evolution. The philosophical and sociological discussions are framed in terms of the complicated relationship between individuals and society, and between civil society and the sovereign power.

CAS PH 260 A1 – Knowledge and Reality
Prof. P. Bokulich
TR, 9:30-11:00

Introduction to ancient, modern, and contemporary accounts of reality and our knowledge of it. Key themes include rationalism, empiricism, skepticism, materialism, idealism, and scientific realism. We shall pay particular attention to the epistemological and metaphysical significance of the evolution and revision of conceptual frameworks.

CAS PH 265 A1 – Minds and Machines
Prof. Webb
TR, 12:30-2:00

An examination of the efforts of artificial intelligence to model the human mind and explain human thought by means of suitably programmed computers. Attention is given to the historical and mathematical origins of such efforts, as well as the main psychological and philosophical assumptions on which they depend.

CAS PH 300 A1 – History of Ancient Philosophy
Prof. Lockwood
TR, 11:00-12:30

This course will explore the history of ancient Greek and Roman philosophy through the examination of changing notions of “eros” (love) and “philia” (friendship). Both concepts hold an important place in classical philosophy in a way which distinguishes the period from other periods in the history of philosophy. The course will begin with the proto-philosophical treatment of Eros in Hesiod’s Works and Days, and then look at eros and philia in Plato’s Lysis, Symposium, and Phaedrus; the course will then examine the ethical significance and problems of philia in Aristotle’s Nicomachean Ethics and the schools of Epicureanism (in Epicurus’ Principle Doctrines) and Stoicism (in Cicero’s de amicitia and Seneca’s Epistles). Throughout the course we will look at supplemental texts that situate the concepts of eros and philia within the broader context of each philosopher’s writings.

CAS PH 310 A1 – History of Modern Philosophy
Prof. Griswold
MWF, 1:00-2:00

An examination of seventeenth- and eighteenth- century philosophy, with emphasis on the nature and extent of knowledge (including our knowledge of the existence of the external world), the nature of personal identity, the problem of free will, and the theological problem of evil. Readings from Bacon, Descartes, Locke, Berkley, Spinoza, Leibniz, and Hume, among others.  Prerequisites: one philosophy course or sophomore standing.

CAS PH 310 B1 – History of Modern Philosophy
Prof. Soyarslan
TR, 3:30-5:00

Between the late sixteenth and late eighteenth centuries, Europe witnessed one of the most intellectually vibrant periods of its history, one which saw the rise of modernity. Throughout this period of political and scientific revolutions, philosophers were crucial actors in forming the new intellectual and social world. This course will survey the development of philosophy in the early modern period by looking at the writings of Descartes, Spinoza, Malebranche, Leibniz, Locke, Berkley, Hume, and Kant. In addition to these issues concerning the nature of reality (metaphysics) and our knowledge of that reality (epistemology), we shall also touch upon questions of ethics. Among the issues to be discussed are the relation between faith and science; the distinction between primary and secondary qualities; the rise and fall of mechanism; skepticism and responses to skepticism; the nature of mind and its relation to body; the nature of human freedom and happiness; and personal identity.

CAS PH 350 A1 – History of Ethics
Prof. Katsafanas
MWF, 2:00-3:00

A critical and comparative examination of the ideas of representative moral philosophers from Plato to Nietzsche. Topics to be discussed include the concept of flourishing, the good life, happiness, the nature of the emotions, the source of ethical obligations and the nature of normativity.

CAS PH 350 B1 – History of Ethics
Prof. Soyarslan
TR, 12:30-2:00

The goal of this course is to encourage students to reflect on the meaning of “being moral” within the context of the development of ethical thought in the West. What is happiness? What is a good life? What does the life of a virtuous person consist in? How does the nature of the distinction and/or relationship between reason and emotion bear on moral theory? These fundamental questions, posed by the ancients but persisting in their relevance, will be our starting point. Next we will explore the ways in which the questions of morality have changed over time as a result of the interplay between culture and ethical theory. In particular, we will see how and to what extent the ancient contemplation of the good life is replaced in modern ethical theory by different sorts of moral questions, such as “How should we live? And “On what principles should we act?” We will explore the similarities and differences between the ancient and modern approaches to ethics, covering a variety of great philosophers in the process, ranging from Plato and Aristotle to Nietzsche, Hume, Kant, and Mill.

CAS PH 406/GRS PH 606 A1 – Aristotle II
Prof. Bronstein
R, 3:30-6:30

We will examine Aristotle’s epistemology and philosophy of science through a close study of the Posterior Analytics. Topics will include: scientific knowledge, demonstration, definition, essence, induction, inquiry, discovery, and learning.

CAS PH 413/GRS PH 613 A1 – Kant
Prof. Kuehn
TR, 2:00-3:30

An in-depth reading of several of Kant’s works.

CAS PH 418/GRS PH 618 A1 – Marx and Marxism
Prof. Cao
M, 5:00-8:00

In this introductory course, Marxism will be treated mainly as a conceptual framework for understanding history and society (including economy, politics, and culture), and also as a critique of capitalism and a program of transforming the capitalist society for human emancipation, with an analysis of both its philosophical and ethical presuppositions and its conceptions of a post-capitalist society. The evolution of its theoretical bases, through its three stages (classical Marxism of Marx and Engels; the Soviet orthodoxy and its critics; and its contemporary versions) will be critically examined, and its practical (political, economic, and cultural) impacts on the historical course since its inception briefly outlined.

CAS PH 420/GRS PH 620 A1 – Special Topics: Contemporary Pragmatism
Prof. Neville
T, 2:00-5:00

A study of contemporary pragmatic movements including Richard Rorty, Jeffrey Stout, Cornell West, Victor Anderson, Robert Brandom, Richard Bernstein, and some metaphysical pragmatists.

CAS PH 424/GRS PH 624 A1 – Wittgenstein
Prof. Hintikka
TR, 11:00-12:30

An overall interpretation of Wittgenstein’s philosophy in the light of his developments. Focal ideas are his phenomenology, his picture “theory” of language, the rule-following problem and the inexpressibility of semantics.

CAS PH 436/GRS PH 636 A1 – Gender, Race, and Science
Prof. A Bokulich
MWF, 2:00-3:00

This course is an examination of issues arising at the intersections of feminist philosophy, philosophy of race, and the history of philosophy of science. We shall examine questions such as the following: How have views about gender and race changed over the history of science and the history of philosophy? Is ‘race’ a genuine scientific category or just a social construct? Why are there still so few women and minority scientists? Has the content of science been affected by the fact that it has been carried out almost exclusively by white men? The primary goal of this course is to come to a deeper and more critically reflective understanding of both the history of the concepts of race and gender and the various roles that these concepts continue to play in contemporary science.

Required Texts:

The Idea of Race edited by Bernasconi and Lott (Hackett 2000); readings indicated [IR]

Philosophy of Science and Race by Naomi Zack ( Routledge2002); indicated [PSR]

The Gender of Science edited by Janet Kourany (Prentice Hall 2002) ; indicated [GoS]

Additional readings available on Blackboard website [BB]

CAS PH 446/GRS PH 646 A1 – Philosophy of Religion
Prof. Zank
TR, 2:00-3:30

Philosophical critiques of religion from Roman antiquity to the 20th century. Major trends examined include rationalism, idealism, materialism, and nihilism. Course texts include Cicero, De natura deorum, Spinoza, A Theological-Political Treatise, John Toland, Christianity not mysterious, Voltaire, Philosophical Dictionary, Kant, Religion Within the Boundaries of Mere Reason, Feuerbach, The Essence of Religion, Nietzsche, On the Genealogy of Morals, and Freud, Future of an Illusion.

CAS PH 452/GRS PH 652 A1 – Ethics of Health Care
Prof. Powell
TR, 11:00-12:30

This course will explore topics in biomedical ethics. The first part of the course will examine historical and recent developments in the law and philosophy of euthanasia, abortion, and definitions of death. The second part of the course will be devoted to the ethics of the new biosciences: Here we will examine the nature of disease and disability, eugenics, the biomedical enhancement of human capacities and human nature, genetic testing, assisted-reproductive technologies, cloning, and the synthetic life sciences. The third and final part of the course will look at some contemporary issues in public health ethics, including measures of human health and wellbeing, the rationing of limited healthcare resources, and the supposed right to healthcare.

CAS PH 454 A1 – Community, Liberty and Morality
Prof. Rorty
TR, 11:00-12:30

Freedom, Liberty and Choice
How do political conceptions of liberty influence philosophical conceptions of free choice…and vice versa? We shall trace transformations in the history of conceptions of liberty and freedom, alternating between political conceptions of liberty and psychological conceptions of freedom of thought and will. We’ll begin with legal and political contexts: (Aristotle on voluntary action; Pericles’ Funeral Oration on political freedom); move to conceptions of “inner” psychological freedom (the Stoics, Augustine, Aquinas, Edwards); then return to political freedom (Rousseau’s contrast between individual “natural” freedom and the political General Will; Kant on freedom as the precondition for the possibility of morality and his views on freedom of thought and speech). Turning to specific applications of these theories, we will examine 1) early American guarantees of civil liberties and 2) Mill’s conception of liberty. What constraints do each of these mandate? (e.g. on e.g. hate speech) Then: back to the inner self with Dostoyevsky’s dialogue between Christ and The Grand Inquisitor, and Sartre’s account of existential freedom. We end with a return to the political domain of freedom: Isaiah Berlin’s distinction between “negative” and “positive freedom” and G.A. Cohen’s “Freedom and Money.”

CAS PH 458/GRS PH 658 A1 – Crime and Punishment
Prof. Simons
W, 2:10-4:10

This seminar will explore a broad range of issues concerning the philosophy of punishment and the substantive criminal law. Topics may include: retributivist and utilitarian justifications for punishment; what should be criminalized; what mens rea or mental state should be required for criminal liability; the moral and legal relevance of the distinction between purposely and knowingly causing harm (not only in criminal law, but also in just war law and theory); whether fortuity or “moral luck” justifies punishing completed crimes more than attempts; justification (e.g. self-defense and necessity) and excuse (e.g. duress and provocation); the meaning and significance of consent in sexual assault and other crimes; *the insanity defense (with attention to the free will/determinism debate); the feminist perspectives on some criminal law topics. The seminar is open both to law students and to philosophy students.* For law students, no prior background in philosophy is presupposed; for philosophy students, no prior background in criminal law is presupposed.

Students will be asked to submit brief written questions and comments about the readings on a weekly basis, and a 15-page paper at the end of the semester, which can be based on the class readings. For those law students wishing to satisfy the writing requirement, a 25-page paper is required.

Enrollment limited to 5 graduate students and 5 undergraduate students (preference given to seniors; only seniors or juniors are eligible).

CAS PH 459/GRS PH 659 A1 – Political Responsibility: A Duty to Obey and a Duty to Disobey
Prof. Lyons
R, 10:40-12:40

It is generally assumed that we are morally required to obey all of our society’s laws, just and unjust alike. Many theorists have accepted and argued for this claim, though most concede that the requirement is not “absolute,” as civil disobedience is sometimes morally justifiable. Some theorists have challenged the purported requirement. More radically, some political activists, such as Thoreau, Gandhi, and King, have held that we are morally required to disobey unjust laws. This seminar will critically consider each of those views.

Seminar members will take turns initiating seminar discussion of the readings. A 4,000 word term paper will be required. Topics must be proposed and approved. A complete and polished draft will be submitted, and will be revised in light of comments received on the draft.

Enrollment is limited; priority will be given to graduating seniors. This seminar originates in the Law School, included law students, and follows the Law School’s scheduling and calendar.

CAS PH 462/GRS PH 662 A1 – Foundations of Math
Prof. Zaigralin
TR, 11:00-12:30

Axiomatic set theory as a foundation for, and field of mathematics: Axiom of Choice, the Continuum Hypothesis, and consistency results.

CAS PH 472/GRS PH 672 A1 – Philosophy of Biology
Prof. Powell
TR, 3:30-5:00

This course will explore conceptual and methodological issues in contemporary biological science, with a focus on evolutionary theory. We will explore such questions as: Do biological species and other taxonomic classifications describe objective entities in the world, or are they simply convenient constructs of our theories? Are there laws in biology and if so, how might these differ from laws of physics? Is there progress in evolution? Can evolutionary biological principles be used to explain cultural change and the origins of complex human traits and institutions, such as morality and religion? Can ethical theory be grounded in our biology? Is there such a thing as human nature, and could/should we use biomedical technologies to enhance defining human characteristics? No particular background knowledge of philosophy or biology is presupposed (beyond a rough recollection of high-school level biology), but some experience in writing and thinking philosophically would be helpful.

CAS PH 484/GRS PH 684 A1 – Topics in Speculative Philosophy: Thinking
Prof. Kestembaum
MWF, 1:00-2:00

Heidegger asks: “What makes a call upon us that we should think and, by thinking, be who we are?” Some questions before us:

  1. How does thinking stand to action and practice?
  2. 2. Does thinking possess a “lastingness” superior to that of images, feelings, and memories?
  3. What cannot be thought?
  4. To what does thinking aspire? To what is responsible? Truth? Reality? Imagination? Logic?
  5. What is philosophical thinking?

[Likely] Texts:

Martin Heidegger, Basic Writings

Hannah Arendt, The Life of the Mind

Michael Oakershott, Rationalism in Politics

CAS PH 486/GRS PH 686 A1 – Topics in Knowledge, Language, and Logic
Prof. Hintikka
TR, 2:00-3:30

Critical examination and re-evaluation of the foundations of logic and epistemology. The topics covered include the shortcomings of the received first-order logic and of axiomatic set theory, logic of knowledge and the ontology of logic.

GRS PH 805 A1 – Modern Philosophy
Prof. Garrett
W, 2:00-5:00

In a famous passage in the “introduction” to David Hume’s A Treatise Concerning Human Nature, Hume noted that “Tis no astonishing reflection to consider, that the application of experimental philosophy to moral subjects should come after that to natural at the distance of above a whole century; since we find in fact, that there was about the same interval betwixt the origins of these sciences; and that reckoning from THALES to SOCRATES, the space of time is nearly equal to that betwixt my LORD BACON and some late philosophers in England, who have begun to put the science of man on a new footing, and have engaged the attention, and excited the curiosity of the public. So true it is, that however other nations may rival us in poetry, and excel us in some other agreeable arts, the improvements in reason and philosophy can only be owing to a land of toleration and of liberty.” In the footnote appended in this passage Hume gives as examples of these new moral philosophers Lord Shaftesbury, John Locke, Joseph Butler, Francis Hutcheson, and Bernard Mandeville. In this seminar we will try to make sense of Hume’s remark and try to understand the enormous change in moral philosophy in Britain between Hobbes and Hume by focusing on these philosophers and a few others—notably Samuel Clarke and John Gay. In addition to Hume we will pay particular attention to Joseph Butler—whose powerful criticisms of his predecessors and his careful analysis of moral phenomenology and the nature of moral reasoning set the agenda for Hume—and Bernard Mandeville—whose arguments for the interconnection of virtue and vice powerfully challenged the account of virtue held tacitly by his fellow philosophers and many of their other presumptions about moral motivation and justification.

GRS PH 860 A1 – Epistemology
Prof. Hopp
M, 10:00-1:00

In this seminar we will examine some of the central topics of epistemology, including skepticism, the foundationalism/coherentism debate, and the internalism/externalism debate. We will examine both historical and contemporary literature on these topics.

GRS PH 994 A1 – Philosophy Proseminar 2
Prof. Rorty
M, 3:30-6:30

This workshop seminar offers advanced graduate students the opportunity to present and discuss work-in-progress (dissertation chapters, papers for job applications, journal submissions). A serious commitment to regular and continuing attendance is expected.