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CAS PH 100 A1 Introduction to Philosophy
Professor Michaela McSweeney
Monday, Wednesday, Friday 10:10AM-11:00AM
Introduces the nature of philosophical activity through careful study of major philosophical topics. Topics may include the nature of reality, knowledge, God’s existence, and the significance of human life. Carries humanities divisional credit in CAS. Effective Fall 2018, this course fulfills a single unit in each of the following BU Hub areas: Critical Thinking and Philosophical Inquiry and Life’s Meaning. Effective Fall 2019, this course fulfills a single unit in each of the following BU Hub areas: Philosophical Inquiry and Life’s Meanings, Ethical Reasoning, Critical Thinking.

CAS PH 100 B1 Introduction to Philosophy
Professor Michaela McSweeney
Monday, Wednesday, Friday 12:20PM-1:10PM
Introduces the nature of philosophical activity through careful study of major philosophical topics. Topics may include the nature of reality, knowledge, God’s existence, and the significance of human life. Carries humanities divisional credit in CAS. Effective Fall 2018, this course fulfills a single unit in each of the following BU Hub areas: Critical Thinking and Philosophical Inquiry and Life’s Meaning. Effective Fall 2019, this course fulfills a single unit in each of the following BU Hub areas: Philosophical Inquiry and Life’s Meanings, Ethical Reasoning, Critical Thinking.

CAS PH 110 A1 Great Philosophers
Professor Benjamin Crowe
Tuesday, Thursday 3:30PM – 4:45PM
An introduction to philosophy through a reading of great figures in western thought. The list may include Plato, Aristotle, Descartes, Roussesau, Nietzsche, Russell. Carries humanities divisional credit in CAS. Effective Fall 2018, this course fulfills a single unit in each of the following BU Hub areas: Historical Consciousness, Philosophical Inquiry and Life’s Meanings, Critical Thinking.

CAS PH 150 A1 Introduction to Ethics
Professor Samia Hesni
Monday, Wednesday, Friday 10:10AM-11:00AM
Many of us want to lead meaningful lives. But what is it for a life to be meaningful? What makes some lives better or more meaningful than others? Can life as a whole have some significance or meaning? Carries humanities divisional credit in CAS. Effective Fall 2018, this course fulfills a single unit in each of the following BU Hub areas: Philosophical Inquiry and Life’s Meanings, Ethical Reasoning, Critical Thinking.

CAS PH 150 B1 Introduction to Ethics
Professor Derek Anderson
Monday, Wednesday, Friday 3:35PM-4:25PM
This course engages with several of the main themes of ethics, one of the major subdivisions of philosophy. Why should a person care about morality? Is there an objective fact about what is right or wrong or is morality subjective? What is it for something to be good? How must a person act in order to be moral? We will investigate several abstract theoretical approaches to these questions and discuss reasons for and against embracing them. The second half of the course will focus on non-ideal ethical theory, an approach that begins with concrete issues in social justice rather than abstract principles. The non-ideal theories we will focus are aspects of Critical Race Theory. We will then go on to explore ways in which theories of knowledge and ethics are connected from a non-ideal perspective. Effective Fall 2018, this course fulfills a single unit in each of the following BU Hub areas: Philosophical Inquiry and Life’s Meanings, Ethical Reasoning, Critical Thinking.

CAS PH 150 C1 Introduction to Ethics
Professor Victor Kumar
Tuesday, Thursday 11:00AM-12:15PM
This course is about emerging ethical problems in the 21st century. The first unit covers TECHNOLOGY AND DISADVANTAGE. We’ll try to answer ethical questions about biomedical enhancement, life extension, global poverty, and animal suffering. The second unit of the course covers TRIBALISM AND THE INTERNET. We’ll turn to ethical questions about social media, political tribalism, backlash, and the 2020 presidential election. The third and final unit of the course covers SEXISM AND FEMINISM. We’ll address questions about homophobia, transmisogyny, gender identity, and sexual discrimination. Some of these issues have legal dimensions. Our focus will be primarily on their ethical dimensions. In general, we’ll explore whether various social practices are morally right or wrong—and why. Because this is a philosophy course, we’ll approach these issues through careful reasoning, argumentation, and open-minded debate. Effective Fall 2018, this course fulfills a single unit in each of the following BU Hub areas: Philosophical Inquiry and Life’s Meanings, Ethical Reasoning, Critical Thinking.

CAS PH 155 A1 Politics and Philosophy
Professor Charles Griswold
Tuesday, Thursday 11:00AM-12:15PM
This course is an introduction to several major themes and questions in political philosophy, such as: What is justice?  What, if anything, legitimizes the exercise of governmental power?  What are the arguments for and against the “social contract”?  What are the foundations of rights, liberty, and equality?  Does a free and fair society include a free market?  Can and should politics be conducted philosophically?  We will examine important works in both the history of Western philosophy and contemporary thought. Current topics (likely concerning immigration and global justice) will also be discussed.  Throughout the course, we will cultivate fundamental philosophical skills of analysis and argumentation as we delve into issues of ongoing importance.

There are no prerequisites for this course.  We meet twice a week; in addition, the student is required to enroll in a once-weekly discussion section.

This course fulfills a single unit in the following BU Hub areas: Philosophical Inquiry and Life’s Meanings, Ethical Reasoning, Critical Thinking.

CAS PH 155 B1 Politics and Philosophy
Professor TBA
Tuesday, Thursday 3:30PM – 4:45PM
What is justice? What are the foundations of property rights, liberty, and equality? Are anarchism and utopianism defensible? This course is an introduction to major themes and questions in political philosophy. It includes a study of classical and modern texts, as well as contemporary political issues. Carries humanities divisional credit in CAS. Effective Fall 2018, this course fulfills a single unit in each of the following BU Hub areas: Philosophical Inquiry and Life’s Meanings, Ethical Reasoning, Critical Thinking.

CAS PH 160 A1 Reason and Argumentation
Professor Derek Anderson
Monday, Wednesday, Friday 10:10AM-11:00AM
This course is an introduction to philosophical methods of inquiry and discourse. We will have three major aims. The first is philosophical. We aim to understand the nature of reason and argumentation; the course will serve as an introduction to logic, epistemology, and philosophy of language. The second is practical. We aim to improve our ability to reason, construct arguments, and identify fallacies. The third is social. Reason and argument are central to the process of social change. In order to achieve a more just society, we need to reason together and argue with one another in ways that facilitate change of belief in the direction of knowledge and social justice. Effective Fall 2018, this course fulfills a single unit in the following BU Hub areas: Philosophical Inquiry and Life’s Meanings, Critical Thinking.

CAS PH 160 B1 Reason and Argumentation
Professor Alisa Bokulich
Tuesday. Thursday 11:00AM-12:15PM
A systematic study of the principles of both deductive and informal reasoning, calculated to enhance students’ actual reasoning skills, with an emphasis on reasoning and argumentation in ordinary discourse. We will emphasize argumentation and criticism in ordinary life and also present formal models of reasoning designed to elicit underlying patterns and structures of reasoning and argumentation that are widely applicable. Simultaneous training in skills of argument analysis, argument pattern recognition, argument construction, and argument interpretation and creation. Effective Fall 2018, this course fulfills a single unit in the following BU Hub areas: Philosophical Inquiry and Life’s Meanings, Critical Thinking.

CAS PH 248 A1 Existentialism
Professor Paul Katsafanas
Monday, Wednesday 12:20PM-2:05PM
The existentialists grappled with some of the most difficult and problematic aspects of the human condition. Is it possible to lead a meaningful life? Might life be unavoidably absurd? What is it to be an authentic individual? Can you be alienated from yourself? Can the way in which we are seen by others limit our freedom? Does modernity foster nihilism? Do certain emotional experiences reveal otherwise hidden features of life? In this course, we will explore the ways in which Fyodor Dostoevsky, Søren Kierkegaard, Friedrich Nietzsche, Jean-Paul Sartre, Simone de Beauvoir, and Albert Camus responded to these questions.  This course fulfills a single unit in each of the following BU Hub areas: Philosophical Inquiry and Life’s Meanings, Ethical Reasoning, Critical Thinking.

CAS PH 251 A1 Medical Ethics
Professor TBA
Monday, Wednesday, Friday 1:25PM-2:15PM
This course will survey ethical issues that arise in connection with medicine and
emerging biotechnologies. It will examine topics such as the right to healthcare, research on human subjects, euthanasia, abortion, cloning, genetic selection, disabilities, and the biomedical enhancement of human capacities. Students can expect to gain not only training in the concepts and methods of moral philosophy and the logic of argumentation, but also the resources needed for assessing ethically difficult questions that healthcare professionals routinely face. Carries humanities divisional credit in CAS. Effective Fall 2018, this course fulfills a single unit in each of the following BU Hub areas: Philosophical Inquiry and Life’s Meanings, Ethical Reasoning, Critical Thinking.

CAS PH 251 B1 Medical Ethics
Professor TBA
Tuesday, Thursday 9:30AM-10:45AM
This course will survey ethical issues that arise in connection with medicine and emerging biotechnologies. It will examine topics such as the right to healthcare, research on human subjects, euthanasia, abortion, cloning, genetic selection, disabilities, and the biomedical enhancement of human capacities. Students can expect to gain not only training in the concepts and methods of moral philosophy and the logic of argumentation, but also the resources needed for assessing ethically difficult questions that healthcare professionals routinely face. Carries humanities divisional credit in CAS. Effective Fall 2018, this course fulfills a single unit in each of the following BU Hub areas: Philosophical Inquiry and Life’s Meanings, Ethical Reasoning, Critical Thinking.

CAS PH 256 A1 Philosophy of Gender and Sexuality
Professor Derek Anderson
Monday, Wednesday, Friday 1:25PM-2:15PM
In this course we will be philosophizing about gender and sexuality from an intersectional perspective. We begin with a detailed study of the concept and phenomenon of intersectionality, focusing on foundational texts and recent philosophical commentary including metaphysical and conceptual analyses. The intersectionality unit will set the agenda for the remainder of the semester. In the second half, we will explore issues in the metaphysics, semantics, epistemology, and politics of gender and sexuality, engaging with both classic and contemporary readings. Here we will bring our intersectional framework to bear on such questions as: What is gender? How is gender constructed? What are social constructions, anyway? What is sexual orientation, and how must concepts of sexuality change within a non-binary understanding of gender? How do identities and conceptions of gender and sexuality interact with intersecting systems of oppression? Who determines the meaning of the word “woman,” and how do they do it? How does a person’s gender and sexuality shape their knowledge of reality? How can we communicate and take effective political action across epistemological barriers? Effective Fall 2018, this course fulfills a single unit in each of the following BU Hub areas: Philosophical Inquiry and Life’s Meanings, The Individual in Community, Critical Thinking.

CAS PH 259 A1 Philosophy of the Arts
Professor C Allen Speight
Tuesday, Thursday 12:30PM-1:45PM
What makes something beautiful? How do different arts (music, dance, painting, sculpture, architecture, film, drama) relate to our aesthetic experience of the world? Explores several philosophical theories of art through specific examples of artwork. Effective Fall 2019, this course fulfills a single unit in each of the following BU Hub areas: Philosophical Inquiry and Life’s Meanings, Aesthetic Exploration, Critical Thinking.

CAS PH 261 A1 Puzzles and Paradoxes
Professor TBA
Tuesday, Thursday 11:00AM-12:15PM
Some of our most basic beliefs, when scrutinized, lead to absurd conclusions. For example, using only beliefs that seem uncontroversial, we can conclude that motion is impossible, that everyone is bald, and it is impossible to give a surprise exam. Carefully scrutinizing the reasoning that leads to these absurdities often yields substantial philosophical insight. In this course, we will examine a number of such puzzles and paradoxes in detail. Effective Fall 2018, this course fulfills a single unit in each of the following BU Hub areas: Philosophical Inquiry and Life’s Meanings, Quantitative Reasoning I, Critical Thinking.

CAS PH 265 A1 Minds and Machines
Professor TBA
Monday, Wednesday, Friday 12:20PM-1:10PM
Examines efforts of artificial intelligence to model the human mind and explain human thought. Explores the historical and mathematical origins of such efforts, and the psychological and philosophical assumptions on which they depend. Carries humanities divisional credit in CAS.

CAS PH 266 A1 Mind, Brain, and Self
Professor Walter Hopp
Monday, Wednesday, Friday 9:05AM-9:55AM
This course is devoted to exploring the relationships among consciousness, the mind, and the brain, the nature of the self or person, and other related topics. This course will also examine whether and to what extent these issues can be addressed by contemporary natural science. Effective Fall 2018, this course fulfills a single unit in each of the following BU Hub areas: Philosophical Inquiry and Life’s Meanings, Writing-Intensive Course, Critical Thinking.

CAS PH 270 A1 Philosophy of Science
Professor TBA
Tuesday, Thursday 12:30PM-1:45PM
Uses scientific examples from the study of physics, biology, and mind. Focuses on the aims of science, the nature of scientific understanding, the structure and interpretation of scientific theories, and the development of science. Carries humanities divisional credit in CAS.

CAS PH 300 A1 History of Ancient Philosophy
Professor Marc Gasser-Wingate
Monday, Wednesday, Friday 11:15AM-12:05PM
Classical Greek philosophy, with a concentration on the philosophies of Plato and Aristotle.

CAS PH 300 B1 History of Ancient Philosophy
Professor C Allen Speight
Tuesday, Thursday 9:30AM-10:45AM
Classical Greek philosophy, with a concentration on the philosophies of Plato and Aristotle.

CAS PH 310 A1 History of Modern Philosophy
Professor Aaron Garrett
Monday, Wednesday, Friday 11:15AM-12:05PM
An examination of seventeenth- and eighteenth-century philosophy from Descartes to Kant, with emphasis on the nature and extent of knowledge. Readings include Descartes, Locke, Spinoza, Berkley, Hume, and Kant.

CAS PH 310 B1 History of Modern Philosophy
Professor Sally Sedgwick
Tuesday, Thursday 3:30PM-4:45PM
An examination of seventeenth- and eighteenth-century philosophy from Descartes to Kant, with emphasis on the nature and extent of knowledge. Readings include Descartes, Locke, Spinoza, Berkley, Hume, and Kant.

CAS PH 350 A1 History of Ethics
Professor TBA
Monday, Wednesday, Friday 9:05AM-9:55AM
Are there fundamental principles for determining the right way to act ethically? How do different eras answer this question? What is the significance of these differences? This course addresses these questions by examining classical ethical texts from different historical traditions. Effective Fall 2018, this course fulfills a single unit in each of the following BU Hub areas: Philosophical Inquiry and Life’s Meanings, Ethical Reasoning, Critical Thinking.

CAS PH 360 A1 (Cross PH 633) Symbolic Logic
Professor Peter Hylton
Tuesday, Thursday 12:30PM-1:45PM
A survey of the concepts and principles of symbolic logic: valid and invalid arguments, logical relations of statements and their basis in structural features of statements, analysis of the logical structure of complex statements of ordinary discourse, and the use of a symbolic language to display logical structure and to facilitate methods for assessing the logical structure of arguments. The course is an introduction to first- order quantificational logic, a key tool underlying work in foundations of mathematics, philosophy of language and mind, philosophy of science and parts of syntax. Carries humanities divisional credit in CAS. Effective Fall 2018, this course fulfills a single unit in each of the following BU Hub areas:
Philosophical Inquiry and Life’s Meanings, Quantitative Reasoning I, Critical Thinking.

CAS PH 410 A1 (Cross PH 610) Continental Rationalism
Professor Aaron Garrett
Monday, Wednesday, Friday 3:35PM-4:25PM
A critical study of major texts of seventeenth-century philosophy.

CAS PH 413 A1 (Cross PH 613) Kant
Professor Sally Sedgwick
Tuesday, Thursday 12:30PM-1:45PM
The focus of this course is Kant’s metaphysics and theory of knowledge.  We will begin with a brief review of some of David Hume’s skeptical arguments concerning human knowledge, then explore how the Critique of Pure Reason is Kant’s effort to “save” metaphysics from Hume’s skepticism.  Among further topics to be considered: Kant’s treatment of the nature of space, his account of role the pure concepts of understanding (the “categories”) in making our experience possible, his argument in defense of the view that we have some material or non-conceptual knowledge that is necessary.  In the final weeks of the course, we will explore his claim that his particular form of idealism provides the foundation for human freedom.

Prereqs:  PH 310 and two other philosophy courses or consent of instructor.
Four credits.
HUB Cats (pending final approval) PLM, HCO, CRT.

CAS PH 415 A1 (Cross PH 615) Nineteenth-Century Philosophy
Professor Benjamin Crowe
Tuesday, Thursday 2:00PM-3:15PM
Study of the important themes in the philosophy of Hegel, Marx, Kierkegaard, and Nietzsche.

CAS PH 430 A1 (Cross PH 630) American Philosophy
Professor TBA
Tuesday, Thursday 3:30PM-4:45PM
The American fascination with religion; Idealism versus Pragmatism in close readings of major texts from three or four among the following: Edwards, Emerson, James, Dewey, Royce, Hocking, Reinhold Niebuhr, Tillich.

CAS PH 436 A1 (Cross PH 636) Gender, Race, and Science
Professor Samia Hesni
Tuesday 3:30PM-6:15PM
Examines issues in feminist philosophy, philosophy of race, and philosophy of science. Is “race” a genuine scientific category or a social construct? How have views about gender and race changed? Why are there still so few women and minority scientists?

CAS PH 440 A1 (Cross PH 640) Metaphysics
Professor Daniel Dahlstrom
Friday 11:15AM-2:00PM
A survey of basic questions in contemporary metaphysics that may include reality, time, change, free will, personal identity, and causation.

CAS PH 443 A1 (Cross PH 643) Philosophy of Mind
Professor Walter Hopp
Monday, Wednesday, Friday 11:15AM-12:05PM
The topic is sentience, embodiment, and the brain. The aim is to develop a”neurophenomenological” approach to consciousness and embodied experience in cognitive science and the philosophy of mind.

CAS PH 453 A1 Classical to Early Modern Political Theory
Professor Judith Swanson
Monday, Wednesday 2:30PM-4:15PM
Focuses on philosophical subjects relevant to ethics and politics, such as virtue and happiness; human nature and reason; qualifications of leadership; aims and means of civic education; and conceptions of law (man-made, natural, divine). Texts by Aristotle, Augustine, Aquinas, Machiavelli. Effective Fall 2019, this course fulfills a single unit in each of the following BU Hub areas: Philosophical Inquiry and Life’s Meanings, Ethical Reasoning, Critical Thinking.

CAS PH 461 A1 (Cross PH 661) Mathematical Logic
Professor Akihiro Kanamori
Tuesday, Thursday 9:30AM-10:45AM
The investigation of logical reasoning with mathematical methods. The syntax and semantics of sentential logic and quantificational logic. The unifying Godel Completeness Theorem, and models of theories. A look at the Godel Incompleteness Theorem and its ramifications. Effective Fall 2018, this course fulfills a single unit in the following BU Hub area: Philosophical Inquiry and Life’s Meanings.

CAS PH 465 A1 (Cross PH 665) Philosophy of Cognitive Science
Professor Victor Kumar
Thursday 3:30PM-6:15PM
This course is about the cognitive science of morality. We’ll read scientific work in evolutionary theory and psychology about moral cognition in humans and other animals. We’ll then explore its philosophical implications for the possibility and feasibility of moral progress and moral regress. We’ll use research in cognitive science to think about the following questions, in particular. Are humans inherently and irremediably tribal and sectarian? Does evolutionary theory support a conservative or liberal approach to social change? When are feelings of anger and outrage toward injustice trustworthy? How can reasoning be an effective way of changing moral attitudes?

CAS PH 476 A1 (Cross PH 676) Philosophy of the Earth Sciences: From Deep Time to the Anthropocene
Professor Alisa Bokulich
Tuesday, Thursday 2:00PM-3:15PM
Examines philosophical and methodological issues arising in the geosciences, from reconstructing events in deep time, proxy data, and the catastrophism-uniformitarianism debate, to analog and computer simulation modeling, and the Anthropocene debate, drawing examples from geology, archaeology, paleontology, and climate science.

CAS PH 488 A1 Topics in Aesthetics
Professor James Schmidt
Wednesday 2:30PM-5:15PM
PH488: Topics in Aesthetics:  Philosophers and Music:  How philosophers (from Plato to Nietzsche to Goehr) approach music and how composers (from Hildegard to Cage and beyond) understand philosophy. Topics include: music’s relation to meaning and emotion, what it is (and isn’t), why people care about it.

CAS PH 610 A1 (Cross PH 410) Continental Rationalism
Professor Aaron Garrett
Monday, Wednesday, Friday 3:35PM-4:25PM
A critical study of major texts of seventeenth-century philosophy.

CAS PH 613 A1 (Cross PH 413) Kant
Professor Sally Sedgwick
Tuesday, Thursday 12:30PM-1:45PM
The focus of this course is Kant’s metaphysics and theory of knowledge.  We will begin with a brief review of some of David Hume’s skeptical arguments concerning human knowledge, then explore how the Critique of Pure Reason is Kant’s effort to “save” metaphysics from Hume’s skepticism.  Among further topics to be considered: Kant’s treatment of the nature of space, his account of role the pure concepts of understanding (the “categories”) in making our experience possible, his argument in defense of the view that we have some material or non-conceptual knowledge that is necessary.  In the final weeks of the course, we will explore his claim that his particular form of idealism provides the foundation for human freedom.

Prereqs:  PH 310 and two other philosophy courses or consent of instructor.
Four credits.
HUB Cats (pending final approval) PLM, HCO, CRT.

CAS PH 615 A1 (Cross PH 415) Nineteenth-Century Philosophy
Professor Benjamin Crowe
Tuesday, Thursday 2:00PM-3:15PM
Study of the important themes in the philosophy of Hegel, Marx, Kierkegaard, and Nietzsche.

CAS PH 630 A1 (Cross PH 430) American Philosophy
Professor TBA
Tuesday, Thursday 3:30PM-4:45PM
The American fascination with religion; Idealism versus Pragmatism in close readings of major texts from three or four among the following: Edwards, Emerson, James, Dewey, Royce, Hocking, Reinhold Niebuhr, Tillich.

CAS PH 633 A1 (Cross PH 360) Symbolic Logic
Professor Peter Hylton
Tuesday, Thursday 12:30PM-1:45PM
A survey of the concepts and principles of symbolic logic: valid and invalid arguments, logical relations of statements and their basis in structural features of statements, analysis of the
logical structure of complex statements of ordinary discourse, and the use of a symbolic language to display logical structure and to facilitate methods for assessing the logical structure of arguments. The course is an introduction to first- order quantificational logic, a key tool underlying work in foundations of mathematics, philosophy of language and mind, philosophy of science and parts of syntax. Carries humanities divisional credit in CAS. Effective Fall 2018, this course fulfills a single unit in each of the following BU Hub areas: Philosophical Inquiry and Life’s Meanings, Quantitative Reasoning I, Critical Thinking.

CAS PH 636 A1 (Cross PH 436) Gender, Race, and Science
Professor Samia Hesni
Tuesday 3:30PM-6:15PM
Examines issues in feminist philosophy, philosophy of race, and philosophy of science. Is “race”a genuine scientific category or a social construct? How have views about gender and race changed? Why are there still so few women and minority scientists?

CAS PH 640 A1 (Cross PH 440) Metaphysics
Professor Daniel Dahlstrom
Friday 11:15AM-2:00PM
A survey of basic questions in contemporary metaphysics that may include reality, time, change, free will, personal identity, and causation.

CAS PH 643 A1 (Cross PH 443) Philosophy of Mind
Professor Walter Hopp
Monday, Wednesday, Friday 11:15AM-12:05PM
The topic is sentience, embodiment, and the brain. The aim is to develop a “neurophenomenological” approach to consciousness and embodied experience in cognitive science and the philosophy of mind.

CAS PH 651 A1 The Color Line, Resistance, and Reparations
Professor David Lyons
Wednesday 2:10PM – 4:10PM* (*tentative)
This seminar examines the role of race and ethnicity in American society from the early colonial period to the present.  Historical and theoretical topics center around settler colonialism and genocide; slavery and racial capitalism; Indian Removal, the Mexican War, and manifest destiny; slave resistance and abolitionism; Dred Scott and Southern secession; Reconstruction, Redemption and Jim Crow; immigration, exclusion, and disfavored minorities; America’s overseas empire; the Great Migration and urban ghettos; the Civil Rights Movement, the Second Reconstruction, and persistence of the color line; the grounds and character of reparations.

Each half seminar session after week 1 will begin with a seminar member’s presentation aimed at promoting discussion on issues relating to the week’s readings.  A schedule of presentations will be developed after the first meeting.

Readings include Lyons, The Color Line (Routledge 2020) plus online materials such as articles in Oxford Handbooks.

Required writing includes (1) two questions about the week’s topics (emailed to dbl@bu.edu by 5 pm a day prior to the seminar meeting); (2) a term paper topic proposal with a brief preliminary bibliography, by Thursday 10/15; (3) a complete polished draft of a 4000-5000 word term paper, by Thursday 11/12; (4) a revised 5000-6000 word term paper, by Thursday 12/3.

*Non-law students should note that the seminar follows the Law School’s calendar and times.

Also available as LAW JD 878.

CAS PH 661 A (Cross PH 461) Mathematical Logic
Professor Akihiro Kanamori
Tuesday, Thursday 9:30AM-10:45AM
The investigation of logical reasoning with mathematical methods. The syntax and semantics of sentential logic and quantificational logic. The unifying Godel Completeness Theorem, and models of theories. A look at the Godel Incompleteness Theorem and its ramifications. Effective Fall 2018, this course fulfills a single unit in the following BU Hub area: Philosophical Inquiry and Life’s Meanings.

CAS PH 665 A1 (Cross PH 465) Philosophy of Cognitive Science
Professor Victor Kumar
Thursday 3:30PM-6:15PM
This course is about the cognitive science of morality. We’ll read scientific work in evolutionary theory and psychology about moral cognition in humans and other animals. We’ll then explore its philosophical implications for the possibility and feasibility of moral progress and moral regress. We’ll use research in cognitive science to think about the following questions, in particular. Are humans inherently and irremediably tribal and sectarian? Does evolutionary theory support a conservative or liberal approach to social change? When are feelings of anger and outrage toward injustice trustworthy? How can reasoning be an effective way of changing moral attitudes?

CAS PH 676 A1 (Cross PH 476) Philosophy of the Earth Sciences: From Deep Time to the Anthropocene
Professor Alisa Bokulich
Tuesday, Thursday 2:00PM-3:15PM
Examines philosophical and methodological issues arising in the geosciences, from reconstructing events in deep time, proxy data, and the catastrophism-uniformitarianism debate, to analog and computer simulation modeling, and the Anthropocene debate, drawing examples from geology, archaeology, paleontology, and climate science.

GRS PH 801 A1 Ancient Philosophy 1
Professor Marc Gasser-Wingate
Monday 2:30PM-5:15PM
An advanced study of works by either Plato or Aristotle.

GRS PH 819 A1 Ethics
Professor Paul Katsafanas
Wednesday 2:30PM-5:15PM
Topic for Fall 2020: Meaning in Life

Recent work on meaning in life.  What is it for an event in one’s life to be meaningful?  Can life as a whole have some significance or meaning?  How does meaning relate to happiness, moral standing, subjective importance, and narrative unity?  How does an event’s being meaningful relate to the agent’s caring about the event?  How do claims about meaning relate to claims about what there’s reason to do, believe, or feel?  Readings from Susan Wolf, Thomas Nagel, Iddo Landau, David Benatar, Christopher Hamilton, Harry Frankfurt, Jeffrey Seidman, Cheshire Calhoun, Arthur Schopenhauer, and others.

GRS PH 871 A1 Philosophy of Science
Professor TBA
Tuesday 6:30PM-9:15PM
The aim of the course is to clarify the credentials and implications of each position (thus provide students a solid ground for participating in wider cultural debates on rationality and relativism), and to have a better understanding of the recent history and current status of philosophy of science (which is part of necessary training for professional philosophers), through a careful examination of the structure of the arguments adopted by each position in dealing with various issues.

GRS PH 880 A1 Metanormativity, Reasons, and Wellbeing
Professor Daniel Star
Tuesday, Thursday 11:00AM-12:15PM
This seminar will focus on the contemporary literature on reasons and the nature of normativity (across ethics, epistemology, and aesthetics), as well as (to a lesser extent) the contemporary literature on wellbeing.

GRS PH 881 A1 Proseminar for First-Year Graduate Students
Professor Daniel Star
Tuesday, Thursday 2:00PM-3:15PM
This seminar is open only to first-year PhD students in philosophy, all of whom are required to enroll. The seminar is designed to help incoming graduate students hone several invaluable philosophical skills, including those needed for effective presentation and defense of one's ideas. Topics vary by semester.

GRS PH 990 A1 Dissertation Workshop
Professor Paul Katsafanas
Monday 4:30PM-6:15PM
Dissertation Workshop. Required for all Philosophy Ph.D. students in their fourth through sixth years

GRS PH 993 A1 Placement Proseminar I
Professor TBA
Wednesday 2:30PM-5:15PM
A workshop seminar offering advanced graduate students the opportunity to present and discuss work-in- progress (dissertation chapters, papers for job applications, journal submissions). A serious commitment to regular and continuing attendance is expected.