Financial Aid from External Sources

Listed below are a number of outside organizations that offer scholarships for graduate study, along with brief descriptions of their offerings and links to their webpages. This list is not exhaustive; with research, students may be able to find other external sources of aid.

Most of these awards have application deadlines in December or January (some are even earlier), so be sure to plan ahead.

Please note: Boston University is not affiliated with nor does it investigate any of these organizations. This page is provided for informational purposes only; BU does not vouch for or guarantee any of these organizations.

Advance Africa

Lists scholarships and grants for those interested in African Studies.

Association for Intelligence Officers Scholarships

Several scholarships offered annually by the AIO. Evaluation criteria may include merit, character, estimated future potential, background (for example, parent’s AIO membership or careers etc), and relevance of their studies to the full spectrum of national security interests and career ambitions.

Association to Unite Democracies Frank Fund

Frank Educational Fund scholarships, awarded by the Association to Unite the Democracies, are given to students interested in international organization and federalism. FEF grants are available to graduate students of strong academic standing who complete one or more of the following requirements: A thesis or dissertation relating to international integration and/or federalism and coursework that places major weight on international integration and/or federalism; or an independent study project relating to international integration and federalism to be conducted as part of a graduate program.

The Beinecke Scholarship

The program seeks to encourage and enable highly motivated students to pursue opportunities available to them and to be courageous in the selection of a graduate course of study in the arts, humanities and social sciences.  Since 1975, the program has selected more than 470 college juniors from more than 100 different undergraduate institutions for support during graduate study at any accredited university.

Boren Fellowships

Boren Fellowships are intended to support U.S. graduate students who will pursue the study of languages and cultures deemed critical to U.S. national security, and who are highly motivated by the opportunity to work in the federal government. Boren Fellowships provide support for overseas study, domestic study, or a combination of both. Boren Fellowships do not require study abroad, although it is strongly encouraged, and most successful applications include a significant overseas component. Study of a foreign language appropriate to the identified country or region must be an integral part of each application. The NSEP service requirement stipulates that an award recipient work in the federal government in a position with national security responsibilities.

Charles B. Rangel Fellowship

The Rangel Graduate Fellowship is a program that aims to attract and prepare outstanding young people for careers in the Foreign Service in which they can help formulate, represent and implement U.S. foreign policy.  Each year, the Rangel Program selects 20 outstanding Rangel Fellows in a highly competitive nationwide process and helps support them through two years of graduate study, internships and professional development activities, and entry into the Foreign Service.  This program encourages the application of members of minority groups historically underrepresented in the Foreign Service and those with financial need.  Fellows who successfully complete the program and Foreign Service entry requirements will receive appointments as Foreign Service Officers.

Educational Advancement Foundation Scholarships

Awards ranging from $1,000 to $2,000 are granted to undergraduate and graduate students who excel academically. To be eligible for this one-year one-time only scholarship, the applicant must: be a full-time and currently enrolled undergraduate student with sophomore standing at an accredited campus-based degree-granting institution; or be a full-time and currently enrolled graduate student at an accredited campus-based degree-granting institution; or continuing a program of study in this or another degree-granting institution; demonstrate exceptional academic achievement with a minimum GPA of 3.0; have demonstrated community service and involvement.

Golden Key

Graduate Scholar Award gives twelve $10,000 scholarships used for post-baccalaureate or professional study at accredited institutions of higher learning (does not have to be in the U.S. or have a Golden Key chapter). Judging criteria include academic merit, campus / community / work commitments, and significant involvement in local Golden Key chapter. Recipients must plan to enroll in graduate school in the fall of year received. Member does not have to be a U.S. citizen; member can apply up to five years after graduation; applicants may continue to re-apply as long as they are eligible, but previous recipients may not re-apply.

The Harry Truman Scholarship Foundation

Truman Scholarships of up to $30,000 are available to those planning to pursue a career in public service sector (government, non-profit, advocacy, etc). Competitive applicants will have a history of participation in extracurricular activities with demonstrated leadership potential. Only students that have not yet entered graduate school are eligible to apply. Applicants must be nominated by a faculty representative at their undergraduate University. Scholars are expected to work in public service for three of the seven years following the completion of the graduate degree.

Intercollegiate Studies Institute Graduate Fellowships

In order to qualify for ISI graduate fellowships, applicants must engage in graduate studies for the purpose of teaching at the college level. Those attending pre-professional (medical, law) schools are ineligible. Applicants must be U.S. citizens and college seniors or graduate students who are familiar with ISI’s purposes and programs and who receive The Intercollegiate Review. Applicants may apply for more than one fellowship, but an applicant may receive only one ISI fellowship during his academic career.

International Student Organization

Lists scholarships for international students studying in the U.S. and for American students studying abroad.

The Jack Kent Cooke Foundation Graduate Scholarship Program

The Jack Kent Cooke Foundation Graduate Scholarship Program will award approximately 40 scholarships to seniors and recent graduates planning to attend graduate school for the first time starting in fall 2008. Each award covers a portion of educational expenses, including tuition, living expenses, required fees, and books for the graduate degree chosen.  The amount and duration of awards vary by student based on the cost of attendance and the length of the graduate program as well as other scholarships or grants received. The maximum available per student per year of study is $50,000 and the maximum length is six years.

Jacob K. Javits Fellowship Program

This program provides fellowships to students of superior academic ability — selected on the basis of demonstrated achievement, financial need, and exceptional promise — to undertake study at the doctoral and Master of Fine Arts level in selected fields of arts, humanities, and social sciences.

James Madison Fellowship

Junior Fellowships are awarded to students who are about to complete, or have recently completed, their undergraduate course of study and plan to begin graduate work on a full-time basis. Junior Fellows have two years to complete their degree. The Fellowships are intended exclusively for graduate study leading to a masters degree. James Madison Fellows can attend any accredited institution of higher education in the United States. Each individual entering the James Madison Fellowship Program will be expected to pursue and complete a masters degree in one of the following (listed in order of preference): Master of Arts degree (MA) in American history or in political science (also referred to as “government and politics” or as “government”); Master of Arts in Teaching degree (MAT) concentrating on either American Constitutional history (in a history department) or American government, political institutions and political theory (in a political science department); Master of Education degree (MEd) or the Master of Arts or Master of Science in Education, with a concentration in American history or American government, political institutions, and political theory. The maximum amount of each award is $24,000, prorated over the period of study.

The Leopold Schepp Foundation Scholarships

The Schepp Foundation provides scholarships to encourage young people to pursue their education and develop good character. The maximum annual award is $8,500. Primary consideration is given to strong character described by references, strong academic achievement and financial need.

Miscellaneous Grants and Fellowships

A site that lists possible fellowship opportunities for individuals studying international relations.

The Paul & Daisy Soros Fellowships for New Americans

The Fellowships are grants for up to two years of graduate study in the United States. Thirty Fellowships will be awarded each year. A New American is an individual who is a resident alien, i.e., holds a Green Card; or has been naturalized as a US citizen, or is the child of two parents who are both naturalized citizens. The applicant must either have a bachelor’s degree or be in her/his final year of undergraduate study. Those who have a bachelor’s degree may already be pursuing graduate study and may receive Fellowship support to continue that study. A successful candidate will give evidence of creativity, originality, and initiative; a capacity for accomplishment; and a commitment to the values expressed in the US Constitution and the Bill of Rights. The third criterion includes activity in support of human rights and the rule of law and in advancing the responsibilities of citizenship in a free society. Each year the Fellow receives a maintenance grant of $20,000 and a tuition grant of one-half the tuition cost of the US graduate program attended by the Fellow (up to a maximum of $16,000 per academic year).

Rotary Foundation Ambassadorial Scholarships

Academic-Year Ambassadorial Scholarships program supports students interested in studying abroad to increase awareness of cultural differences and the needs of low-income countries. The scholarship provides a flat grant of $27,000 for one academic year of study in another country. These awards are intended to help defray costs associated with round-trip transportation, tuition and other fees, room and board, and some educational supplies.

Thomas R. Pickering Graduate Foreign Affairs Fellowship

The Thomas R. Pickering Graduate Foreign Affairs Fellowship Program provides funding to participants as they are prepared academically and professionally to enter the United States Department of State Foreign Service.  Women, members of minority groups historically underrepresented in the Foreign Service, and students with financial need are encouraged to apply.

The goal of the Fellowship Program is to attract outstanding students who enroll in two-year master’s degree programs in public policy, international affairs, public administration, or academic fields such as  business, economics, political science, sociology, or foreign languages, who represent all ethnic, racial and social backgrounds and who have an interest in pursuing a Foreign Service career in the U.S. Department of State.  The program develops a source of trained men and women who will represent the skill needs of the Department and who are dedicated to representing America’s interests abroad.

James Madison Fellowship

 

Junior Fellowships are awarded to students who are about to complete, or have recently completed, their undergraduate course of study and plan to begin graduate work on a full-time basis. Junior Fellows have two years to complete their degree. The Fellowships are intended exclusively for graduate study leading to a masters degree. James Madison Fellows can attend any accredited institution of higher education in the United States. Each individual entering the James Madison Fellowship Program will be expected to pursue and complete a masters degree in one of the following (listed in order of preference): Master of Arts degree (MA) in American history or in political science (also referred to as “government and politics” or as “government”); Master of Arts in Teaching degree (MAT) concentrating on either American Constitutional history (in a history department) or American government, political institutions and political theory (in a political science department); Master of Education degree (MEd) or the Master of Arts or Master of Science in Education, with a concentration in American history or American government, political institutions, and political theory. The maximum amount of each award is $24,000, prorated over the period of study.

www.jamesmadison.com

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