OSP FO# 11-003

AGENCY: National Science Foundation (NSF)/Directorate for Education and Human Resources (EHR)/Division of Undergraduate Education

PROGRAM: Robert Noyce Teacher Scholarship Program

OBJECTIVES: This program provides funding to institutions of higher education to provide scholarships, stipends, and programmatic support to recruit and prepare science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) majors and professionals to become K–12 teachers. The program seeks to increase the number of K–12 teachers with strong STEM content knowledge who teach in high-need school districts. In addition, the program supports the recruitment and development of NSF Teaching Fellows who receive salary supplements while fulfilling a 4-year teaching requirement and supports the development of NSF Master Teaching Fellows by providing professional development and salary supplements while they are teaching for five years in a high-need school district. A goal of the program is to recruit individuals with strong STEM backgrounds who might otherwise not have considered a career in K–12 teaching.

The Robert Noyce Scholarship Program will fund proposals in the following three categories:

1) Robert Noyce Teacher Scholarship Track—the Robert Noyce Scholarship track provides funding for two categories of proposals: Phase I proposals are invited from institutions that have not previously been funded under the Robert Noyce Scholarship Program; Phase II proposals are invited from institutions that have previously been funded under the Robert Noyce Scholarship program and whose award expiration date occurs on or before December 31, 2011.

Phase I proposals provide scholarships and internships for juniors and seniors who are majoring in a science, technology, engineering, or mathematics (STEM) discipline and stipends for STEM professionals seeking to become teachers. In addition, Phase I proposals may offer paid summer internships in formal or informal STEM educational settings, including internships in industry, university or federal laboratories as a strategy for interesting students in teaching. Proposals may address the undergraduate scholarship component or the post-baccalaureate stipend component or both.

Within Phase II, two options are available: Scholarship and Stipend (S&S) Projects and Monitoring and Evaluation (M&E) projects. Phase II S&S Awards provide funds for prior awardees to expand and extend the evaluation and research efforts initiated under the original award and to support additional cohorts of scholarship and stipend recipients. Phase II M&E Awards provide funding to measure project outcomes through longitudinal evaluation studies and the continued monitoring of Noyce recipients to ensure they have completed their teaching requirement. Phase II proposals are expected to show evidence of the success of the previous award that warrants additional funding. These proposals must include plans for conducting longitudinal evaluation studies of students supported under the previous Noyce award as well as monitoring and evaluation of new cohorts of students. Proposals must include plans for evaluating the impact of the program on recruitment of teachers and the effectiveness of the Noyce recipients as K-12 teachers.

2) NSF Teaching Fellowships and Master Teaching Fellowships (TF/MTF) Track—TF/MTF awards provide support for institutions to administer fellowships and provide programmatic support to STEM professionals, referred to as NSF Teaching Fellows, who enroll in a master’s degree program leading to teacher certification or licensing and fellowships to mathematics and science teachers, referred to as NSF Master Teaching Fellows, who have a master’s degree and participate in a program for developing Master Teachers. Proposals may focus on Teaching Fellows or on Master Teaching Fellows or may support both groups; however, proposals focusing on Master Teaching Fellows are expected to involve the Master Teaching Fellows in the institution’s preservice teacher education program.

Projects should provide academic courses, activities, and clinical teaching experiences leading to a master’s degree and teacher certification or licensing for the NSF Teaching Fellows. Institutions are expected to provide the programs and support, including evidence-based strategies, to enable the Fellows to complete a master’s degree and obtain teacher certification or licensing within one year and to become successful elementary or secondary teachers. Projects should provide mentoring and professional development while the teachers are fulfilling their teaching requirement.

3) Capacity Building Projects—Capacity Building projects provide an opportunity for institutions to establish the infrastructure and partnerships for implementing a future Noyce Teacher Scholarship or NSF Teaching Fellowship project by supporting the development of new teacher preparation programs for STEM majors and STEM professionals and new programs for developing STEM Master Teachers.

ELIGIBILITY RESTRICTIONS: The PI, or at least one Co-PI, must be a faculty member in a mathematics, science, or engineering department.

Scholarships for STEM Majors—Scholarship recipients must be U.S. citizens or nationals, or permanent resident aliens, must be majoring in mathematics, engineering, or a science discipline, and must be in the last 2 years of a baccalaureate degree program. Students enrolled in institutions requiring a fifth year or post-baccalaureate program for teacher certification may apply the scholarship to the post-baccalaureate program. Recipients of scholarships must commit to completion of two years of service as a mathematics or science teacher for each year the scholarship is received. Service must be performed within 8 years after graduation from the program for which the scholarship was awarded and must be performed in a high need local educational agency.

Stipends for STEM Professionals—Stipend recipients must hold a baccalaureate, master’s, or doctoral degree in science, mathematics, or engineering and enroll in a teacher certification program, and must be U.S. citizens or nationals, or permanent resident aliens. Recipients of stipends must commit to serving two years as a mathematics or science teacher in a high-need local educational agency, within 4 years after graduation or completion of the program for which the stipend was awarded. Current K–12 teachers seeking new or re-certification are not eligible to receive Noyce scholarships or stipends.

TF/MTF Track proposals—NSF Teaching Fellows are required to serve as mathematics or science teachers in elementary or secondary schools in high-need school districts for 4 years. The teaching obligation must be completed within 6 years of completing the master’s degree program. NSF Master Teaching Fellows are required to teach for 5 years in a high-need school district and must complete this requirement within 7 years of the start of participation in the program.

DEADLINES:
BU Internal Deadline: January 28, 2011
Letter of Intent (optional): February 23, 2011
Full Proposals: March 23, 2011

FUNDING INFORMATION: The NSF anticipates providing $53.5 million for new Noyce awards in FY 2011. NSF expects to fund an estimated 35–46 standard or continuing grant awards, including approximately 15–20 Noyce Phase I awards of up to $1.2 million (1.45 million in the case of partnerships with two-year colleges) for a total award amount and duration of up to 5 years. Up to 20% of the proposed budget may be allocated for activities associated with program development and enhancement, recruitment and preparation of teachers, marketing the program, conducting monitoring and evaluation, and applicable indirect costs.

NSF expects to fund approximately 4–6 Noyce Phase II awards. Phase II S&S proposals may request up to $750,000 for a total award amount and duration of up to 5 years. Up to 20% of the proposed budget may be allocated for activities associated with program development and enhancement, recruitment and preparation of teachers, marketing the program, conducting monitoring and evaluation, and applicable indirect costs. Phase II M&E proposals may request up to $150,000 in total budget for duration of up to 3 years.

NSF expects to fund 8–10 TF/MTF awards of up to $3 million ($3,250,000 in the case of partnerships with two-year colleges) for a total award amount and duration of up to 5 or 6 years. Up to 20% of the proposed budget may be allocated for activities associated with program development and enhancement, recruitment and preparation of teachers, marketing the program, conducting monitoring and evaluation, and applicable indirect costs. Cost sharing is required in the amount of at least 30% of the total funds requested if the total amount of NSF funding requested is below $1.5 million and at least 50% of total funds if the request is $1.5 million or more. At least 50% of the match must be in cash; the remainder may be in-kind support.

NSF expects to fund 8–10 Capacity Building awards of up to $300,000 ($350,000 in the case of partnerships with two-year colleges) and duration of two years.

AGENCY CONTACT:
Joan T. Prival, Lead Program Director
National Science Foundation
4201 Wilson Boulevard, Room 835 N
Arlington, VA 22230
Telephone: (703) 292-4635
Fax: (703) 292-9015
Email: jprival@nsf.gov
Web: http://www.nsf.gov/pubs/2011/nsf11517/nsf11517.htm

REMARKS: An internal deadline has been established to coordinate institutional cost-sharing commitments for this program. Principal Investigators (PIs) interested in submitting a proposal should forward a memorandum to their Associate Dean by Friday, January 28, 2011. In the memorandum, (1) briefly describe the proposed project, (2) list key participating faculty, (3) itemize all cost-sharing commitments being requested from the University, within the context of a fully developed project budget, and (4) cite any program features which should make it particularly competitive for NSF funding. The memorandum should be countersigned by the relevant department chair/center director to indicate endorsement of the project. After the Dean’s assessment, if a commitment of Provost funds is required, the memorandum will be forwarded to OSP-CRC Director Joan Kirkendall for review and then to the Provost’s Office for authorization. PIs will then be advised of authorized institutional cost-sharing commitments in time to complete the project budget and process their proposal for final review. PIs are encouraged to consult with the Office of Sponsored Programs (OSP) for assistance with the preparation of the project budget.

Applications must be submitted electronically using either the NSF FastLane system or Grants.gov. Collaborative proposals must be submitted via FastLane. For more information about FastLane, or to register as a FastLane user, please contact Alex Effgen (abeffgen@bu.edu) or Elmer Smith (esmith2@bu.edu)in the Office of Sponsored Programs (OSP) at x3-4365. Information about Grants.gov for BU Investigators can be obtained on the OSP website at: http://www.bu.edu/osp/proposal-preparation/electronic-submission/. In addition, for investigators interested in submitting proposals via Grants.gov, NSF has published the NSF Grants.gov Application Guide which may be found online at: http://www.nsf.gov/bfa/dias/policy/docs/grantsgovguide.pdf. Investigators should contact the OSP Assistant Director assigned to their school or department as soon as possible to coordinate submission through either FastLane or Grants.gov.

Complete program guidelines and application material (NSF 11-517 and NSF GPG 11-1) may be obtained from the web site listed above or from the Office of Sponsored Programs (OSP). Please distribute this notice to any faculty or staff members who might be interested in the information. For more information, please contact the OSP at X3-4365 or ospinfo@bu.edu, or visit the OSP web site at http://www.bu.edu/osp.