Career Changers Routes to Licensure

NOYCEThe Nation’s Youth Need You!

As a career changer, you bring to teaching something special and unique: insight and perspective on real-world application and impact of science and engineering on society. Your experiences help provide an answer to the proverbial student question “and what can I do with science?”

Did You Know?

  • Physics, chemistry and physical science teachers are in great demand. It is likely a new physics or chemistry teacher would have several schools competing to hire them.
  • Teacher salaries for people with no teaching experience but a Master’s degree in the Boston area start at around $55K or more and increase with each year of experience and further education.
  • Many teachers after 10-years of teaching earn over $100K a year.
  • Teachers typically have 12-weeks of vacation and an excellent benefit package.
  • The teacher retirement system provides up to 80% of your three best contiguous years of salary to be paid to you during your retirement years.
  • Good teaching is hard work and requires many hours out of the classroom for reflecting, planning, revising, grading, etc. to be effective. The good news is job satisfaction is very high.

Pathways to Teaching for Career Changers

Boston University School of Education MAT and EdM programs offer three distinct pathways to a new career as a professional educator. You can choose from a 10-month plan that requires full time immersion in an MAT course of study or a 12-month or 24-month part time plan in an Ed.M course of study that would allow you to continue working part time or even full time while you complete most of your degree requirements here at BU. These are no cost or low cost programs for those accepted into the Noyce Scholar program.

Click on the links below to see the specifics of each of these pathways.

Sound good? Then click on the link below to read more about the Boston University Science Teacher programs for career changers and the application process that will get you started.

http://www.bu.edu/noyce/science/sci_pgm_description/