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Department of Psychology

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MA in Psychology
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The following list reflects the 2005/2006 faculty.

Chairman Howard Eichenbaum

Faculty

David H. Barlow

Professor of Psychology, College of Arts and Sciences. AB, Notre Dame University; MA, Boston College; PhD, University of Vermont

Deborah Belle

Professor of Psychology, College of Arts and Sciences. BA, University of Chicago; EdD, Harvard Graduate School of Education

Leslie Brody

Professor of Psychology, College of Arts and Sciences. BS, Cornell University; PhD, Harvard University

Timothy Brown

Professor of Psychology, College of Arts and Sciences. BS, Old Dominion University; PsyD, Virginia Consortium for Professional Psychology

Albert Caron

Professor of Psychology, College of Arts and Sciences. MA, PhD, University of Chicago

James Cherry

Associate Professor of Psychology, College of Arts and Sciences. AB, Lake Forest College; PhD, North Carolina State University

Alice Cronin-Golomb

Professor of Psychology, College of Arts and Sciences. BA, Wesleyan University; PhD, California Institute of Technology

Jill Ehrenreich

Research Assistant Professor of Psychology, College of Arts and Sciences. BA, University of Florida; MA, PhD University of Mississippi

Howard Eichenbaum

Chairman, Department of Psychology; Professor of Psychology, College of Arts and Sciences. BS, PhD, University of Michigan

Richard Ely

Instructor of Psychology, College of Arts and Sciences. BA, Tufts University; BS, Boston University; MS, Boston College; MA, PhD, Tufts University

Todd Farchione

Research Assistant Professor of Psychology, College of Arts and Sciences. BA, Wayne State University; MA, PhD, University of California, Los Angeles

Margaret Hagen

Professor of Psychology, College of Arts and Sciences. BA, University of Washington; MA, PhD, University of Minnesota

Catherine L. Harris

Associate Professor of Psychology, College of Arts and Sciences. BA, Harvard University; PhD, University of California, San Diego

Michael E. Hasselmo

Professor of Psychology, College of Arts and Sciences. AB, Harvard University; PhD, University of Oxford (England)

Stefan G. Hofmann

Associate Professor of Psychology, College of Arts and Sciences. AB, Ellental Gymnasium (Germany); MA, PhD, Philipps-Universität Marburg/Lahn (Germany)

Kathleen M. Kantak

Professor of Psychology, College of Arts and Sciences. BA, State University of New York at Potsdam; PhD, Syracuse University

Deborah Kelemen

Assistant Professor of Psychology, College of Arts and Sciences. BA, University of Manchester (England); MA, PhD, University of Arizona

Jacqueline A. Liederman

Associate Professor of Psychology, College of Arts and Sciences. BA, City University of New York; PhD, University of Rochester

Paul Lipton

Research Assistant Professor of Psychology, College of Arts and Sciences. BA, State University of New York, Buffalo; MA, State University of New York, Stony Brook; PhD, Boston University

Michael Lyons

Professor of Psychology, College of Arts and Sciences. BA, C.W. Post College; MS, Columbia University; MA, PhD, University of Louisville

Kathleen Malley-Morrison

Professor of Psychology, College of Arts and Sciences. BA, Swarthmore College; EdM, EdD, Boston University

Henry Marcucella

Professor of Psychology, College of Arts and Sciences. BA, Northeastern University; MA, PhD, Boston University

David I. Mostofsky

Professor of Psychology, College of Arts and Sciences. BA, Yeshiva University; MA, PhD, Boston University

Michael Otto

Professor of Psychology, College of Arts and Sciences. BA, MA, PhD, University of Mexico

Tibor P. A. Palfai

Associate Professor of Psychology, College of Arts and Sciences. BS, University of Toronto (Canada); MS, MPhil, PhD, Yale University

Hilda Perlitsh

Associate Professor of Psychology, Graduate School of Arts and Sciences. BA, City University of New York, Brooklyn College; MA, PhD, Duke University

Claudette Pierre

Research Assistant Professor of Psychology, College of Arts and Sciences. BS, Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University; MS, George Peabody College for Teachers; EdD, PhD, Peabody College of Vanderbilt University

Donna B. Pincus

Research Associate Professor of Psychology, College of Arts and Sciences. BA, Brandeis University; MS, PhD, State University of New York, Binghamton

Elizabeth Pratt

Clinical Assistant Professor of Psychology, College of Arts and Sciences. BA, Wesleyan University; MS, PhD, Rutgers University

Mark Richardson

Assistant Professor of Psychology, College of Arts and Sciences. BA, University of California, Berkeley; MA, PhD, University of California, Los Angeles

Kimberly Saudino

Associate Professor of Psychology, College of Arts and Sciences. BSc, University of Toronto (Canada); DipCS, Institute of Child Study at the University of Toronto (Canada); MA, PhD, University of Manitoba (Canada)

Lisa C. Smith

Clinical Assistant Professor of Psychology, College of Arts and Sciences. BA, Middlebury College; PhD, St. John's University

David C. Somers

Assistant Professor of Psychology, College of Arts and Sciences. BA, Harvey Mudd College; PhD, Boston University

Chantal Stern

Associate Professor of Psychology, College of Arts and Sciences. BA, McGill University (Canada); PhD, University of Oxford (England)

Liza Suarez

Clinical Assistant Professor of Psychology, College of Arts and Sciences. BA, University of Puerto Rico; MA, PhD, University of California, Los Angeles

Heather Thompson-Brenner

Research Assistant Professor of Psychology, College of Arts and Sciences. AB, Harvard University; PhD, University of Michigan

Martha C. Tompson

Associate Professor of Psychology, College of Arts and Sciences. BA, University of Texas at Austin; MA, PhD, University of California, Los Angeles

Takeo Watanabe

Professor of Psychology, College of Arts and Sciences. BA, PhD, University of Tokyo (Japan)

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Affiliated Faculty

Deborah Brief

Assistant Professor of Psychiatry and Psychology, College of Arts and Sciences. BA, University of Pennsylvania; MA, PhD, University of Illinois

Daniel Bullock

Associate Professor of Cognitive and Neural Systems and Psychology, College of Arts and Sciences. BA, Reed College; PhD, Stanford University

Dominic Ciraulo

Professor of Psychiatry and Psychology, College of Arts and Sciences. BS, University of Hartford; MD, Georgetown University

Anne Copeland

Adjunct Associate Professor of Psychology, College of Arts and Sciences. BA, Eckerd College; MA, PhD, American University

Jessica Daniel

Adjunct Associate Professor of Psychology, College of Arts and Sciences. BS, Fayetteville State College; MS, PhD, University of Illinois

Heidi Ellis

Assistant Professor of Psychiatry and Psychology, College of Arts and Sciences. BA, Yale University; MS, PhD, University of Oregon

Stephen Grossberg

Wang Professor of Cognitive and Neural Systems and Professor of Biomedical Engineering, Math, and Psychology, College of Arts and Sciences. AB, Dartmouth College; MS, Stanford University; PhD, Rockefeller University

Suzy Bird Gulliver

Clinical Assistant Professor of Psychiatry and Psychology, College of Arts and Sciences. BS, Quinnipiac College; MA, Connecticut College; PhD, University of Vermont

Terence Keane

Professor of Psychiatry and Psychology, College of Arts and Sciences. BA, University of Rochester; MA, PhD, State University of New York

Karestan Koenen

Assistant Professor of Psychiatry and Psychology, College of Arts and Sciences. BA, Wellesley College; MA, Columbia University; PhD, Boston University

Conan Kornetsky

Professor of Psychiatry and Pharmacology and Psychology, School of Medicine. BA, University of Maine; MS, PhD, University of Kentucky

Wendy Lippe

Adjunct Assistant Professor of Psychology, College of Arts and Sciences. BA, University of Michigan; MA, PhD, Boston University

Brett Litz

Associate Professor of Psychiatry and Psychology, College of Arts and Sciences. BA, MA, PhD, State University of New York, Binghamton

Joseph LoCastro

Associate Professor of Psychiatry and Psychology, College of Arts and Sciences. BS, State University of New York; MA, PhD, University of Maryland

William Malamud

Professor of Psychiatry and Psychology, College of Arts and Sciences. BA, Wesleyan University; MD, Boston University

Mark Miller

Assistant Professor of Psychiatry and Psychology, College of Arts and Sciences. BA, The American University; MA, PhD, Florida State University

Ennio Mingolla

Professor of Cognitive and Neural Systems and Psychology, College of Arts and Sciences. AB, Harvard College; MEd, Boston University; PhD, University of Connecticut

Sandra Baker Morissette

Assistant Professor of Psychiatry and Psychology, College of Arts and Sciences. BA, University of Vermont; MA, PhD, Boston University

Susan Orsillo

Assistant Professor of Psychiatry and Psychology, College of Arts and Sciences. BA, MA, PhD, University at Albany, State University of New York

John Otis

Assistant Professor of Psychiatry and Psychology, College of Arts and Sciences. BA, University of West Florida; PhD, University of Florida

Patricia Resick

Professor of Psychiatry and Psychology, College of Arts and Sciences. BA, Kent State University; MA, PhD, University of Georgia

Lizabeth Roemer

Adjunct Assistant Professor of Psychology, College of Arts and Sciences. BA, Northwestern University; MA, PhD, Pennsylvania State University

Glen Saxe

Assistant Professor of Psychiatry and Psychology, College of Arts and Sciences. BA, McGill University; MD, McMaster University

Haline Schendan

Adjunct Assistant Professor of Psychology, College of Arts and Sciences. BA, MA, University of California, Berkeley; PhD, University of California, San Diego

Alma Dell Smith

Adjunct Assistant Professor of Psychology, College of Arts and Sciences. BA, Smith College; MS, PhD, University of Georgia

Helen Tager-Flusberg

Professor of Anatomy and Neurobiology and Psychology, College of Arts and Sciences. BSc, University College, University of London; PhD, Harvard University

Rosemary Toomey

Adjunct Assistant Professor of Psychology, College of Arts and Sciences. BA, Northwestern University; MA, PhD, University of Montana

Mieke Verfaellie

Associate Professor of Neurology and Psychology, College of Arts and Sciences. BA, MA, PhD, University of Louvain, Belgium

Kamila S. White

Adjunct Assistant Professor of Psychology, College of Arts and Sciences. BS, Kansas State University; MS, PhD, Virginia Commonwealth University

Barbara Ann Wolfsdorf

Assistant Professor of Psychiatry and Psychology, College of Arts and Sciences. BA, University of Maryland; MA, PhD, University of Miami

Associates in Clinical Psychology:

Alan Bodnar, Richard Bonier, Frank Boring, Gerald Borofsky, Jean Chin, Abraham Chipman, Haskell Cohen, Leon Cohen, Charles Ducey, Ralph Fingar, Arnold Gofstein, Norine Johnson, Phillip Kleespies, Gerald Koocher, Gerald Lewis, Nancy Lindsay, James McCord, Joel Match, Arnold Miller, Robert Misch, Melvin Rosenthal, Carol Rubin, Richard Schnell, Robert Schnitzer, Jonathan Slavin, Irene Stiver, Marion Winterbottom, June Grant Wolf, and Regina Yando

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Emeriti

Murray L. Cohen

Professor Emeritus of Psychology, College of Arts and Sciences. AB, New York University; AM, University of Missouri; PhD, Boston University

Jean Berko Gleason

Professor Emerita of Psychology, College of Arts and Sciences. AB, AM, PhD, Harvard University

Frances K. Grossman

Professor Emerita of Psychology, College of Arts and Sciences. AB, Oberlin College; MS, PhD, Yale University

J. Michael Harrison

Professor Emeritus of Psychology, College of Arts and Sciences. Dipl. in Electrical Engineering, Post Grad. Academic Dipl. in Psychology, University of London (England)

Robert H. Harrison

Professor Emeritus of Psychology, College of Arts and Sciences. AB, Oberlin College; MS, PhD, Pennsylvania State University

Douglas M. McNair

Professor Emeritus of Psychology, College of Arts and Sciences. AB, PhD, University of North Carolina

Garry J. Margolius

Professor Emeritus of Psychology, College of Arts and Sciences. BA, University of Iowa; AM, University of Missouri; PhD, Washington State University

Freda Rebelsky

Professor Emerita of Psychology, College of Arts and Sciences. BA, MA, Universty of Chicago; PhD, Harvard University

Leonard Solomon

Professor Emeritus of Psychology, College of Arts and Sciences. BA, Brooklyn College; PhD, New York University

Henry Weinberg

Professor Emeritus of Psychology, College of Arts and Sciences. BS, MA, Boston University; AM, PhD, Harvard University

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The Graduate Program

The Department of Psychology offers training leading to the PhD degree. Students may apply to one of three programs: Brain, Behavior, and Cognition; Clinical; or Human Development (a program with specializations in developmental, personality, social, and family psychology). Although the MA degree is routinely awarded en route to the PhD, each of the graduate programs is structured as a doctoral training program. Candidates interested in a terminal MA should apply to the master's-only program that emphasizes the contribution of psychologists and workers in related disciplines to the understanding of a variety of behavioral, cognitive, and societal issues.

Admissions committees for each of the programs look for evidence of ability to complete successfully a demanding program of study, reviewing carefully the student's letters of reference, personal statement, academic history, various test scores, and the match between the student's interests and the strengths of each of our programs. The committees attempt to make intelligent judgments about development and improvement in performance, maturity of motivation, scholarly commitment, ability to cope with the demands of applied programs, sensitivity, and so on.

A strong background in psychology is usually the best preparation for graduate work in the area, but it is not essential, particularly for the MA program. The admissions committees are as concerned with a high level of undergraduate performance as with a concentration in psychology.

Requests for application materials to any of the PhD or MA programs should be addressed to the Graduate School of Arts and Sciences, Boston University, 705 Commonwealth Avenue, Boston, MA 02215. For additional PhD and MA program information please visit the Department of Psychology. Please do not attempt to telephone or e-mail program directors for information or special requests. The application deadline for the Clinical PhD program is December 1st. Please note that applications, as well as all credentials and supplementary materials, must be submitted in one packet by the deadline. Incomplete applications will not be reviewed. The application deadline for the Brain Behavior and Cognition PhD program and the Human Development PhD program is January 15th. Applications to the MA-only program are reviewed in two rounds. The first deadline for completed applications is March 1. The second deadline for completed applications is June 1. Please submit applications, as well as all supplementary materials, in one packet.

Complete application packets should be sent to the Graduate School of Arts and Sciences. Please do not direct application materials to the Department of Psychology. All applicants to the MA and PhD programs must submit recent scores (within the last five years) of the Graduate Record Examination (GRE) General Test. The Graduate Record Examination Subject Test in Psychology (or in your major if different from psychology) and the Miller Analogies Test are optional.

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Financial Assistance

The department attempts to provide some form of assistance for PhD candidates during their period of full-time study but cannot guarantee such aid. Types of assistance available to doctoral candidates are described below.

Teaching Fellowships

A teaching fellowship provides a stipend as well as a tuition scholarship and general fees for up to eight semester courses per year. Teaching fellows lead discussion and laboratory sections in the introductory courses and in some advanced courses. All teaching fellows participate in a teaching seminar that deals with various approaches, techniques, and problems of instruction and learning.

Graduate Assistantships

Tuition and general fees are provided for up to eight semester courses for the academic year, but without a stipend. In return, the student must be available for up to 20 hours of weekly service to the department.

Research Assistantships

Faculty research grants provide support for some students. Responsibilities, training experience, and stipends are provided.

Martin Luther King Jr. Fellowships

These fellowships provide a tuition scholarship plus a stipend. They are available from the Graduate School of Arts and Sciences, upon departmental nomination, to African American students in all departments.

Additional Support

is available from sources outside the University.

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MA in Psychology

The following requirements are for students admitted to one of the PhD programs. The requirements for students admitted to the MA-only program are somewhat different, and further information is available on our website at the Department of Psychology.

Course Requirements

Each candidate must pass the course GRS MA 614 Statistical Methods II or GRS PS 711 Statistics in Psychology I and additional courses to a minimum total of eight semester courses (32 credits), of which at least six must be in psychology.

Comprehensive Requirement

The candidate must, by the pattern of courses taken, demonstrate knowledge of two fundamental areas of psychology. Each student must satisfy a research requirement. During the first year, this is initiated through the director of the program and the student's advisor.

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PhD in Psychology

Course Requirements

For all PhD programs, each candidate must satisfy all requirements for the MA degree and also pass the courses GRS MA 684 Multivariate Analysis or GRS PS 712 Statistics in Psychology II. A minimum total of 16 semester courses (64 credits) of graduate work is required for the Brain Behavior and Cognition and Human Development programs. A minimum total of 20 courses of graduate work is required for the Clinical program. For specific course requirements for each program, please visit the Department of Psychology. Courses are selected in consultation with the major advisor, who may determine that additional work is required. Doctoral education includes appropriate research and practicum experience and is rarely completed in fewer than four academic years.

Comprehensive Examination

In addition to satisfying the MA comprehensive requirement, the PhD candidate must demonstrate knowledge in a third area.

Qualifying Examinations

In addition to the comprehensive examination in the fundamentals of psychology, the candidate must also pass an intensive examination in the area of specialization. This examination is ordinarily taken upon completion of two years of graduate work. These examinations may be supplemented by an oral examination and, at the discretion of the department, a student may be required to retake this exam. In addition, some programs may require preparation of a "specials" paper, which consists of a detailed analytic review of an appropriate body of research literature or clinical qualifying exam, which consists of a case analysis.

Residency Requirement

See General Requirements for the PhD in this site.

Prospectus and Dissertation

See General Requirements for the PhD in this site. Upon completion of all departmental language and qualifying examinations, the candidate must submit a formal dissertation prospectus.

Final Oral Examination

Upon completion of all requirements, the candidate must pass a final oral examination in defense of the dissertation and demonstrate a mastery of the field of specialization as it is related to the dissertation.

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Courses

CAS PS 504 Trends in Contemporary Psychology

Prereq: four principal courses in psychology including one experimental course. Various contemporary trends in psychology presented. Content varies: consult department for emphasis and topics. Cherry, Harris, Marcucella. 4 cr, either sem.

CAS PS 506 Themes in the Near History of Psychology

Not offered 2006/2007

CAS PS 520 Research Methods in Perception and Cognition

Prereq: CAS PS 222, 336, and PS 211 or MA 115/116 or equivalent; or consent of instructor. Computer-based laboratory instruction in research methods and techniques for perception and cognitive science. Students plan and conduct experiments, and analyze and present data. Somers. 4 cr, 1st sem.

CAS PS 522 Psychology of Picture Perception

Not offered 2006/2007

CAS PS 525 Cognitive Science

Not offered 2006/2007

CAS PS 528 Human Brain Mapping

Prereq: CAS PS 336 or consent of instructor. Localization in the brain of human mental functions and the study of their neural mechanisms. Topics include methods (fMRI, PET, TMS, ERP), memory, perception, recognition, attention, and executive processes. Somers, Stern. 4 cr, either sem.

CAS PS 530 Neural Models of Memory Function

Prereq: consent of instructor. Computational models of neurobiological mechanisms for memory function and spatial navigation, with a particular emphasis on cellular and circuit models of the hippocampus and related cortical structures. Hasselmo. 4 cr, 2nd sem.

CAS PS 542 Child Development and Public Policy

Not offered 2006/2007

CAS PS 544 Developmental Neuropsychology

Prereq: consent of instructor. Study of the neural mechanisms underlying behavioral development. Topics include the plasticity of the developing brain in response to deprivation or damage and mechanisms underlying specific syndromes (e.g., aphasia, dyslexia, learning disabilities, hyperactivity, autism, and Tourette's syndrome). Liederman. 4 cr, 1st sem.

CAS PS 545 Language Development

Language development in children. The acquisition of phonological, morphological, and syntactic systems; the role of both parent and child in the acquisition of communicative competence. Harris. 4 cr, 1st sem.

CAS PS 546 Cognitive Development

Cognitive Development from birth through early adolescence. Relationship of cognition to other traditional areas of psychology (e.g., perception, language, learning, memory, physiology, and psychopathology). Kelemen. 4 cr, 1st sem.

CAS PS 547 Postchildhood Development

Not offered 2006/2007

CAS PS 548 Perceptual Development

Not offered 2006/2007

CAS PS 563 Seminar: Groups in Organizations

Not offered 2006/2007

CAS PS 564 Environmental Psychology

Not offered 2006/2007

CAS PS 565 Social and Environmental Psychology of Urban Life

Not offered 2006/2007

CAS PS 572 Psychology of Women

Consideration of research topics in the psychology of women. Topics covered include various stages in the life cycle, women's work and family lives, aspects of victimization, and women's position in the larger society. Belle, Costos. 4 cr, either sem.

CAS PS 573 Abstract Thought

Not offered 2006/2007

GRS PS 699 Teaching of Psychology I

Not offered 2006/2007

GRS PS 704 Contemporary Trends in Psychology

MA and PhD proseminar. Required for all MA candidates and for PhD candidates in the programs in human development. Hofmann, Kelemen, Perlitsh. 4 cr, either sem.

GRS PS 711 Statistics in Psychology I

Not offered 2006/2007

GRS PS 712 Statistics in Psychology II

Design of experiments, analysis of covariance, generalized multiple regression, and correlation. Brown. 4 cr, 2nd sem.

GRS PS 715 Models and Methods of Psychological Measurement

Not offered 2006/2007

GRS PS 716 Psychological Research Methods

Not offered 2006/2007

GRS PS 721 General Experimental I

Not offered 2006/2007

GRS PS 732 Clinical Psychopharmacology

Not offered 2006/2007

GRS PS 733 Behavioral Medicine

For students in the allied health specialists, education, and social work. Applications and analysis of behavior modification techniques in the context of health care delivery systems. Mostofsky. 4 cr, 1st sem.

GRS PS 734 Psychopharmacology for the Behavioral Scientist

Basic principles of pharmacology, drugs used in treatment of mental illness, drugs having abuse potential. Current issues in psychopharmacology. Kantak. 4 cr, 2nd sem.

GRS PS 735 Concepts of Motivation

Not offered 2006/2007

GRS PS 737 Memory Systems of the Brain

Survey of investigations into the brain systems and neurobiological mechanisms of memory. Includes experimental studies of amnesia associated with brain damage in humans, experimental models of amnesia in animals, and neurophysiological studies of brain activity that encodes memories in animals and humans. Focus on evidence for multiple forms of memory and distinct brain systems that mediate them. Stern. 4 cr, 2nd sem.

GRS PS 738 Techniques in Systems and Behavioral Neuroscience

Laboratory course in which techniques used to address questions in systems and behavioral neuroscience are taught. Techniques to be covered include basic neuroanatomical methods, immuniocytochemistry, physiological manipulations on behavior, electrophysiological recordings in slice preparations and in behaving animals, and behavioral paradigms. Meets with GRS BI 756. Cherry. 4 cr, 2nd sem.

GRS PS 747 Infant Development

Not offered 2006/2007

GRS PS 750 Mind and Language

Prereq: CAS PS 546 or PS 525 or PS 545 or equivalent, or consent of instructor. Seminar examines how language influences cognition. Surveys cognitive, developmental, psycholinguistic, and primate psychology literatures to explore whether cross-linguistic differences cause cross-cultural differences in cognition, and whether possession of a language faculty influences the nature of thought. Kelemen. 4 cr, 2nd sem.

GRS PS 751 Personality Theory

Prereq: consent of instructor. Examines the major contemporary approaches to personality and clinical psychology. Through a mixture of classic and current research and theory, addresses psychodynamic, cognitive-social, trait, biological, humanistic/existential, and cultural approaches. Shim. 4 cr, 1st sem.

GRS PS 754 Forensic Psychology

Prereq: senior standing or CAS PS 354. Examines scope, empirical foundations, and ethical issues of forensic psychology. Topics include eyewitness testimony; use of hypnosis; polygraphs; and criminal profiling; scientific jury selection; risk assessment; child abuse evaluations; and determinations of insanity, competency, and child custody. Hagen. 4 cr, either sem.

GRS PS 755 Psychoanalytic Theory

Not offered 2006/2007

GRS PS 757 Women and Psychotherapy

Not offered 2006/2007

GRS PS 761 Major Issues in Social Psychology

Emperical and theoretical approaches to selected areas of social psychology. Includes interpersonal behavior, attitude formation and change, social comparison process, and group behavior. Palfai. 4 cr, 1st sem.

GRS PS 770 Ethics in Psychology

Designed for graduate students in psychology and related fields who plan to be engaged in some form of the practice of psychology. Topics include ethics of clinical and consulting practice, of teaching, and of psychological research. Grossman. 4 cr, 2nd sem.

GRS PS 772 Clinical Psychological Assessment of Adults

Theoretical and empirical bases for diagnostic and structured interviews, standardized cognitive tests, psychopathology rating scales, projective methods, and tools for evaluating community systems and epidemiology. Administration, scoring, and general principles of clinical interpretation of representative measures (WAIS, MMPI, Social Networks Inventory, Rorschach). Farchione. 4 cr, 2nd sem.

GRS PS 773 Clinical Psychological Assessment of Children and Families

Clinical applications of and theoretical and emperical bases for structured diagnostic and play interviews, standardized cognitive and personality tests, and projective methods. Administration and clinical interpretation of representative measures (e.g.,WISC-R, Rorschach, and Family genograms). Ehrenreich. 4 cr, 2nd sem.

GRS PS 774 Clinical Psychological Assessment of Adults Practicum

Note: Must co-register for GRS PS 772. This course is the applied practicum course for Clinical Psychological Assessment of Adults (PS 772). It is designed to provide a comprehensive, applied experience in psychological assessment report writing and the administration, scoring, cognitive/intellectual and personality functioning. Richardson. 4 cr, 2nd sem.

GRS PS 779 Problems in Clinical Research I

Not offered 2006/2007

GRS PS 780 Problems in Clinical Research II

Not offered 2006/2007

GRS PS 790 Family Theory and Research

Not offered 2006/2007

GRS PS 791 Psychology of Social Oppression

Primary focus on academic research and theoretical models as applied to people of color. The psychologist in minority settings, program development, cross-cultural research issues, and alternative models of traditional psychological theories. Daniel. 4 cr, either sem.

GRS PS 793 Family Seminar

Not offered 2006/2007

GRS PS 821 Learning

Basic concepts in behavior theory and analysis of data in operant and respondant conditioning. Macuella. 4 cr, 1st sem.

GRS PS 822 Visual Perception

Theory and data relating to contemporary problems in visual perception. Watanabe. 4 cr, 1st sem.

GRS PS 823 Verbal Processes

Not offered 2006/2007

GRS PS 824 Cognitive Psychology

Not offered 2006/2007

GRS PS 828 Seminar in Psycholinguistics

Not offered 2006/2007

GRS PS 829 Clinical Neuropsychology

Central nervous system processes underlying memory, language, cognition, emotion, sensory functioning, and motor function in normal and pathological conditions. Theory, experimental findings, and reference to clinical cases. Cronin-Golomb. 4 cr, 1st sem.

GRS PS 831 Seminar in Neuropsychology

Central neurone processes underlying emotions, learning, and consciousness in humans and animals. Theory, methods, and experimental findings; laboratory demonstrations. Effect of brain pathology in human subjects. Liederman. 4 cr, 2nd sem.

GRS PS 832 Physiological Psychology

Not offered 2006/2007

GRS PS 833 Advanced Physiological Psychology

Not offered 2006/2007

GRS PS 835 Attention

Not offered 2006/2007

GRS PS 836 Molecules and Behavior

Not offered 2006/2007

GRS PS 840 Developmental Behavioral Genetics

Not offered 2006/2007

GRS PS 841, 842 Seminar: Contemporary Issues in Developmental Psychology

Not offered 2006/2007

GRS PS 844 Theories of Development

Comparative examination of theories of psychological development and their usefulness in interpreting behavioral phenomena. Major consideration to theories of Freud, Piaget, and Werner. Saudino. 4 cr, 1st sem.

GRS PS 845 Topics in Perceptual Development

Not offered 2006/2007

GRS PS 846 Psychology of Aging

Not offered 2006/2007

GRS PS 847 Atypical Development

Not offered 2006/2007

GRS PS 848 Developmental Psycholinguistics

Not offered 2006/2007

GRS PS 855 Clinical Seminar in Developmental Psychopathology

Not offered 2006/2007

GRS PS 857 Clinical Case Conference

Not offered 2006/2007

GRS PS 860 Child Therapy

Child therapy cases and processes are explored for a multi-theoretical perspective including systems, analytic, and cognitive-behavioral theories. Empirical research on therapies for specific disorders (e.g., conduct disorders, eating disorders, etc.) will also be discussed. Brody. 4 cr, 2nd sem.

GRS PS 873 Seminar: Psychodiagnosis

Not offered 2006/2007

GRS PS 874 Seminar: Psychotherapy

Basic clinical concepts of psychotherapy and their application in the treatment of personality and behavior disorders. Case materials from the students' and instructor's therapeutic work used to illustrate special problems. Brody. 4 cr, 1st sem.

GRS PS 875 Advanced Psychopathology

Prereq: consent of instructor. This seminar presents an introductory overview to specific clinical disorders and syndromes. Neurobiological, psychoanalytic, behavioral, and social perspectives are emphasized. It is recommended that students have some preparation in physiological psychology. Lyons. 4 cr, 1st sem.

GRS PS 876 Advanced Psychopathology

Not offered 2006/2007

GRS PS 877 Group Dynamics and Group Therapy

Not offered 2006/2007

GRS PS 879 The Scientist Practitioner

Prereq: Doctoral students in clinical psychology only. To acquaint first-year doctoral students in clinical psychology with the role of the scientist-practitioner as a guiding philosophical underpinning to the practice of clinical psychology. A focus will be on the crucial role of the scientist-practitioner in our emerging behavioral healthcare system. Barlow. 4 cr, 1st sem.

GRS PS 880 Empirically Supported Treatments of Psychological Disorders

The goal of this seminar is to become familiar with the efficacy and effectiveness of some of the most important state-of-the-art treatments for various psychological problems. Each participant is expected to present a paper discussing the theory, efficacy, and clinical utility of the selected psychosocial interventions. Hofmann. 4 cr, 2nd sem.

GRS PS 881 Psychological Perceptives on Addictive Behavior

Examines the psychological theories of addiction and their implications for prevention, treatment, and health policy. Topics include craving, self-control, biological, and psychosocial factors that influence addiction and recovery, and approaches to addiction treatment. Palfai. 4 cr, 2nd sem.

GRS PS 882 Child and Family Treatment

Not offered 2006/2007

GRS PS 885 Community Psychology

Not offered 2006/2007

GRS PS 886 Community Research Methods

Not offered 2006/2007

GRS PS 887 Community Mental Health Planning

Not offered 2006/2007

GRS PS 889 Community Mental Health Intervention

Not offered 2006/2007

GRS PS 890 Behavior Modification I

Not offered 2006/2007

GRS PS 892 Behavior Modification II

Not offered 2006/2007

GRS PS 893 Contemporary Issues in the Psychology of the Family

Empirical and conceptual approaches to selected topics in the psychology of the family. Content varies from semester to semester. Information available from the department. Belle. 4 cr, 2nd sem.

Directed Study or Research

Time arranged on all directed study courses and practicums. Variable cr.

GRS PS 901, 902 Directed Study in Psychology

Doctoral candidates are encouraged to undertake special projects.

GRS PS 941, 942 Developmental Psychology Practicum

Not offered 2006/2007

GRS PS 951 Special Topics in Clinical Psychology

Clinical doctoral students only. Clinical or laboratory research of clinical faculty and invited speakers, ethical issues in research and clinical practice, professional responsibilities and concerns. Lyons. Variable cr, either sem.

GRS PS 965, 966 Social Psychology Practicum

Not offered 2006/2007

GRS PS 973, 974 Clinical Practicum

Open to advanced candidates in clinical psychology. Students participate in psychological programs of approved practicum centers, reporting and evaluating their experiences in seminar conferences. Work is directed toward increasing competence in the duties expected in clinical behavioral medicine. Smith. Variable cr, either sem.

GRS PS 977, 978 Laboratory and Research Practicum

Open to advanced doctoral candidates in psychology. A review of contemporary research in selected areas. Issues of experimental design, execution, and data analysis are examined in the context of pursuing dissertation research. TBA. Variable cr, either sem.

GRS PS 979/980 Clinical Internship

Prereq: dissertation proposal defended, completion of all course requirements; approval of the clinical faculty. For clinical doctoral students only. Students complete a one-year clinical internship as part of the requirements for the PhD degree in clinical psychology. Lyons. 2 cr, either sem.

GRS PS 991, 992 Directed Study in Dissertation Writing

Not offered 2006/2007

Related Courses in Cognitive and Neural Systems

Descriptions for the courses listed below can be found in the course offerings for the Department of Cognitive and Neural Systems.

CAS CN 510 Principles and Methods of Cognitive and Neural Modeling I

(1st sem.)

CAS CN 520 Principles and Methods of Cognitive and Neural Modeling II

(1st sem.)

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12 October 2006
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