Tagged: Boston University School of Public Health

Study Finds Socioeconomic Status Linked to Weight Gain and Risk of Obesity in African American Women

June 13th, 2012 in Health & Medicine, News Releases 0 comments

Contact: Gina DiGravio, 617-638-8480, gina.digravio@bmc.org

(Boston) – Socioeconomic status across one’s lifetime is related to weight gain and risk of obesity in African American women, according to a new study led by researchers from the Slone Epidemiology Center at Boston University. These findings currently appear online in the journal Ethnicity & Disease.

The researchers followed 23,601 African American women under the age of 55 from 1995 to 2009. These women were participants in the Black Women’s Health Study, a follow-up study of the health of African Americans conducted by the Slone Epidemiology Center. The women provided information on their education, the education of their parents and updated information on their own weight over the follow-up period.

The researchers found that women whose parents had not completed high school gained more weight and more often became obese in adulthood than women who had a parent with a college degree. “However, if the woman herself had completed college, she was not at higher risk of obesity regardless of her parents’ educational level,” explained lead author Patricia Coogan, DSc, senior epidemiologist at the Slone Epidemiology Center and associate professor of epidemiology at the Boston University School of Public Health.

According to the researchers, low levels of parental and current education were associated with greater weight gain and higher obesity risk. However, over a lifetime, women at the highest level of current education (college graduate) had the lowest weight gain and risk of obesity regardless of their parents’ educational achievement. Current educational level of “some college” did not provide the same protective effect on weight gain and obesity risk.

“Our results suggest that women who were disadvantaged in childhood, as indicated by low level of parental education, have greater weight gain as adults, but this tendency can be largely overcome if the woman herself has a high level of education,” said Coogan. “A high level of education may be a marker of more access to healthy food and other factors that influence weight gain,” she added.

Funding for this study was provided by the National Cancer Institute.


Tagged , , , ,

BUSM, BUSPH Researchers Validate New Drug Use Consequences Test for Primary Care

March 21st, 2012 in News Releases, School of Medicine, School of Public Health 0 comments

Contact: Gina Orlando, (617) 638-8490, gina.orlando@bmc.org

(Boston) – Researchers from the Boston University School of Medicine (BUSM) and Boston University School of Public Health (BUSPH) have conducted a study on a modified version of the Short Inventory of Problems (SIP) to help promote early intervention and treatment for patients with drug use in primary care. The findings, which validate this modified version of the SIP in a primary care setting, will appear online in the American Journal on Addictions in the March issue.

The SIP, originally designed to measure the health and social consequences of alcohol use, was adapted to create the SIP-Drug Use (SIP-DU) to assess the consequences of drug use. The SIP-DU is intended to be used by primary care physicians who can identify and intervene with drug users years before they have medical complications or seek treatment.

In the study, 106 patients from a primary care clinic at Boston Medical Center were assessed using questions from the SIP-DU. The results suggest that the SIP-DU is a valid measure of drug use consequences and compares favorably to other SIP versions. In addition, the study indicates that the SIP-DU is a brief and time-efficient screening method that could be useful in a primary care setting.

“The SIP-DU is important because there is currently a lack of validated substance use instruments available for use in primary care; most have been developed and used in specialty care settings,” said lead author, Donald Allensworth-Davies, PhD, MSc, research manager of the Data Coordinating Center at BUSPH. “In the current climate of health reform and efforts to integrate substance use and medical care, tools like this are greatly needed.”

According to the researchers, the purpose of this study was to validate a version of the SIP that can be used in a primary care setting for drug use consequences. When a patient is identified as using drugs, it is important to know whether they have any consequences so that any advice, counseling or referral to help the patient can be done appropriately. The researchers have used this tool in an innovative program that integrates medical, mental health and addiction care in a primary care setting.

Tagged ,

Controlling Healthcare Costs: Your Money or Your Life

October 1st, 2010 in Campus Events, Health care, Public Health 0 comments

cutler

Today starting at 9AM ,  leading experts will debate heathcare ideas and others as part of the 2010 William J. Bicknell Lectureship in Public Health at the Boston University School of Public Health. This year’s topic is “Controlling Healthcare Costs: Your Money or Your Life?”  featuring lecturer David Cutler. Panelists include Alice Coombs, M.D. President of the Massachusetts Medical Society; William C. Van Faasen, CEO of Blue Cross Blue Shield of Massachusetts; and Kate Walsh, M.P.H. President and CEO of the Boston Medical Center. The event will take place at 670 Albany Street on the Medical Campus.

Tagged , , , , , , , ,