Category: William Keylor

Nuke deal may blow up on Kerry

July 15th, 2015 in 2015, Boston Herald, College and Graduate School of Arts and Sciences, Newsmakers, Pardee School of Global Studies, William Keylor 0 comments

KeylorBoston Herald
William Keylor, College of Arts & Sciences, Pardee School of Global Studies

The controversial nuclear agreement U.S. Secretary of State John F. Kerry helped strike with Iran remains a high-stakes gamble for the U.S. that analysts say could doom the Bay State Democrat’s legacy if Tehran secretly breaks the deal, terrorists exploit it, Congress overrides it — or Israel is attacked…

Expert quote:

“If it works … I’d be very surprised if Kerry did not win the Nobel Peace Prize. But on the other hand, if there is evidence of violations, then that will be very difficult for the administration … and it will suffer all the consequences.”

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Experts Media Alert – Terrorist attacks in France, Tunisia, & Kuwait

June 26th, 2015 in 2015, College and Graduate School of Arts and Sciences, Experts Media Alert, News Releases, Pardee School of Global Studies, William Keylor 0 comments

KeylorTerrorists have killed dozens and injured many more people in attacks in France, Tunisia, and Kuwait. Early reports believe the attacks are the work of Islamic radicals. The first attack occurred at an American-owned gas factory in France.

William Keylor, a professor of history and international relations at BU’s  Pardee School of Global Studies, offers the following comment on the attack in France:

“This attack on a gas factory in a French town near Lyon has every mark of a lone wolf, copycat operation, like the horrendous attacks on the offices of the Charlie Hebdo magazine and the kosher supermarket last January.  ISIS ‘s claim of responsibility, which enjoys some credibility because of the beheading, may be simply an attempt to capitalize on an individual terrorist act after the fact. But if the police investigation turns up evidence of a wider plot involving ISIS and its network in France, President Hollande will have to decide what kind of response is appropriate.”

Contact Keylor at 617-358-0197 or wrkeylor@bu.edu.

For additional commentary by Boston University experts, follow us on Twitter at @BUexperts

Cold War Distorted European Perception of WWII Victory

May 10th, 2015 in 2015, College and Graduate School of Arts and Sciences, Newsmakers, Pardee School of Global Studies, William Keylor 0 comments

KeylorSputnik News
William Keylor, College of Arts & Sciences, Pardee School of Global Studies

The decades-long Cold War which followed World War II altered the way Europeans perceive the victory over Nazi Germany, experts interviewed by Sputnik said…

Expert quote:

“It is no surprise that people in Western Europe consider the American army to be the major contributor to the victory against Nazi Germany. That is the legacy of the Cold War, when the US and its European allies considered the Soviet Union a grave threat to the security of the world.”

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Ignored Warnings, Conspiracy Theories Define Lusitania’s Legacy 100 Years After Sinking

May 6th, 2015 in 2015, College and Graduate School of Arts and Sciences, Newsmakers, Pardee School of Global Studies, William Keylor 0 comments

KeylorCBSNewYork.com
William Keylor, College of Arts & Sciences, Pardee School of Global Studies

It was a maritime disaster almost as deadly as the Titanic…

Expert quote:

“If you were planning to go to Europe and you read The New York Times, you certainly should have at least been apprehensive a little bit about the prospect of the sinking of the ship.”

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Experts Media Alert – The sinking of the Lusitania

April 7th, 2015 in 2015, College and Graduate School of Arts and Sciences, Experts Media Alert, News Releases, William Keylor 0 comments

Bundesarchiv_DVM_10_Bild-23-61-17,_Untergang_der_-Lusitania-

Photo courtesy Creative Commons

Once considered the world’s largest passenger ship, the RMS Lusitania was en route from New York to Liverpool, when near the coast of Ireland, it was torpedoed by a German U-boat on May 7, 1915. A few weeks earlier, the German embassy in Washington warned Americans that they would be traveling at their own risk on British or Allied ships in war zones. On board the Lusitania at the time of the sinking were more than 1,900 passengers and crew, with over 1,100 perishing when the ship was struck.

KeylorWilliam Keylor, a professor of international relations at BU’s Pardee School of Global Studies, sees an historical link between the American public and congressional reaction to the Lusitania sinking a century ago and the American public and congressional reaction to recent ISIS beheadings, kidnapping of girls, etc. He says “In 1915, terms like “barbarians” and “Huns” made the rounds to express the outrage at Imperial Germany in response to the killing of the innocent civilians on the ship. We have heard similar expressions of outrage towards ISIS.”

Professor Keylor will be presenting a paper at a conference sponsored by the Society for Diplomatic History. The title of the conference is “The Role of Parliaments during World War I” and participants are from France, Germany, Great Britain, Austria, and Switzerland. Professor Keylor is the only American presenting a paper. The title of his paper is “From Neutrality to War to Peace: The Evolution of the Role of the United States Congress in the Conduct of American Foreign Policy, 1914-1919.”

Keylor is available to comment on the centennial of the sinking of the Lusitania. He can be reached at 617-358-0197 or wrkeylor@bu.edu.

For additional commentary by Boston University experts, follow us on Twitter at @BUexperts

Past Nevada U.S. senator’s legacy under debate

February 23rd, 2015 in 2015, College and Graduate School of Arts and Sciences, Newsmakers, Pardee School of Global Studies, William Keylor 0 comments

KeylorLas Vegas Review Journal
William Keylor, College of Arts & Sciences

The legacy of one of Nevada’s early leaders is under fire in one of the more upscale neighborhoods of the nation’s capital…

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It was German soldiers who made first move in the Christmas Truce

December 23rd, 2014 in 2014, College and Graduate School of Arts and Sciences, Newsmakers, OP-EDs by BU Professors, Pardee School of Global Studies, The Conversation US, William Keylor 0 comments

KeylorThe Conversation US
By William Keylor, College of Arts & Sciences

The Christmas Truce is no stranger to popular entertainment – this year more than any other as its 100th anniversary is marked…

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Range of ways to hit back at North Korea

December 20th, 2014 in 2014, Boston Herald, College and Graduate School of Arts and Sciences, Newsmakers, Pardee School of Global Studies, William Keylor 0 comments

KeylorBoston Herald
William Keylor, College of Arts & Sciences

Possible retaliation against North Korea for hacking Sony Pictures could include re-listing it as a state sponsor of terror, going after the country’s trading partners, launching a counter-cyber attack or simply screening the film to the widest possible audience, analysts told the Herald…

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Experts Media Alert – The Christmas Truce of 1914

December 8th, 2014 in 2014, College and Graduate School of Arts and Sciences, Experts Media Alert, News Releases, William Keylor 0 comments

Christmas_Truce_1914

Photo courtesy of Creative Commons

World War I had been going on for several months when on Christmas Eve 1914, the sounds of artillery faded along the Western Front as German and British troops held an unofficial truce, known as The Christmas Truce. Unarmed German troops left their trenches on Christmas morning and approached British soldiers to offer Christmas wishes. Skeptical and thinking it a trick, the British soldiers kept their guns aimed at the Germans. Finally convinced the Germans were sincere, both troops climbed out of their trenches and the men began to sing Christmas carols, exchange gifts. Some reports say there was even a football match in “No Man’s Land.” The war continued the next day.

KeylorWilliam Keylor, a professor of history and international relations at Boston University’s Pardee School of Global Studies, is available to offer commentary and analysis on The Chrismas Truce. An expert on World War I, he has authored several books and articles on the subject, as well as being the editor of The Legacy of the Great War: Peacemaking 1919. He most recently was interviewed on WPFW Pacifica Radio in Washington, D.C. discussing how the conflicts of today in the Middle East date back to the turbulent years of World War I.

Keylor can be reached at 617-358-0197 or wrkeylor@bu.edu.

For additional commentary by Boston University experts, follow us on Twitter at@BUexperts

Veteran’s Day & WWI’s impact on the current Middle East

November 12th, 2014 in 2014, College and Graduate School of Arts and Sciences, Newsmakers, Pardee School of Global Studies, William Keylor 0 comments

KeylorWPFW-FM “Community Watch & Comment”
William Keylor, College of Arts & Sciences

View video of expert William Keylor
(Scroll down to “Community Watch & Comment” for Tuesday, Nov. 11; Segment begins at approx. 2:17)