Category: School of Medicine

Do Food Labels Miscount Calories? Kind Of

April 28th, 2015 in 2015, Caroline Apovian, Newsmakers, School of Medicine 0 comments

Caroline-Apovian-300x300Yahoo! Health
Caroline Apovian, School of Medicine

Nutrition experts have stressed for years that calorie counting is the best way to maintain a healthy weight. But what if the calories listed on your food labels aren’t accurate?..

Expert quote:

“If this was that big of a deal, we would all be underweight. Even if our food labels are overestimating the food content, nobody is looking at it.”

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For Teenagers, Potassium May Matter More Than Salt

April 27th, 2015 in 2015, Blogs, Lynn Moore, New York Times, Newsmakers, RESEARCH @ BU, School of Medicine 0 comments

lynn-moore-225x300New York Times “Well Blog” (subscription required)
Lynn Moore, School of Medicine

A diet high in potassium appears to protect teenagers from high blood pressure in adulthood, while a low-salt diet had no effect, according to new research…

Expert quote:

“It may be that potassium is more of a determinant of blood pressure than sodium is. The kids who consumed the most potassium had much lower blood pressures by the end of adolescence. What we need to focus on is increasing potassium intake rather than focusing on restricting sodium intake.”

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Long Term Exposure To Air Pollution May Cause Brain Damage

April 26th, 2015 in 2015, Newsmakers, RESEARCH @ BU, School of Medicine, Sudha Seshadri 0 comments

Seshadri_STech Times
Sudha Seshadri, School of Medicine

Air pollution could result in brain damage affecting cognitive function, according to a new study…

Expert quote:

“This is concerning since we know that silent strokes increase the risk of overt strokes and of developing dementia, walking problems and depression. We now plan to look at more the impact of air pollution over a longer period, its effect on more sensitive MRI measures, on brain shrinkage over time, and other risks including of stroke and dementia.”

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Very Young Kids Often Use Tablets, Smartphones, Study Finds

April 26th, 2015 in 2015, HealthDay News, Jenny Radesky, Newsmakers, RESEARCH @ BU, School of Medicine 0 comments

HealthDay News
Jenny Radesky, School of Medicine

Up to half of very young children use smartphones and tablets in some way before their first birthday, a new study finds. But parents still worry about their children’s use of mobile media, a separate study says…

Expert quote:

“We were struck with how intensely many parents wanted to vent their feelings about this topic. Many expressed feeling that mobile and interactive media are proliferating so rapidly that they aren’t sure how to keep up, how to judge good from bad apps for kids, how to say ‘no’ when their child demands more, or how to keep their child interested in ‘old-fashioned’ or hands-on play.”

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Air pollution could increase risk of dementia

April 24th, 2015 in 2015, Newsmakers, RESEARCH @ BU, School of Medicine, Sudha Seshadri 0 comments

Seshadri_SThe Telegraph
Sudha Seshadri, School of Medicine

Middle-aged and older adults who live in towns and cities suffer ageing of the brain and increased risk of dementia and strokes because of air pollution, new research suggests…

Expert quote:

“On average participants who lived in more polluted areas had the brain volume of someone a year older than participants who lived in less polluted areas. They also had a 46 per cent higher risk of silent strokes. This is concerning since we know that silent strokes increase the risk of overt strokes and of developing dementia, walking problems and depression.”

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Long-term exposure to air pollution may pose risk to brain structure, cognitive functions

April 23rd, 2015 in 2015, Newsmakers, RESEARCH @ BU, School of Medicine, Sudha Seshadri 0 comments

Seshadri_SScience Daily
Sudha Seshadri, School of Medicine

Air pollution, even at moderate levels, has long been recognized as a factor in raising the risk of stroke…

Expert quote:

“This study shows that for a 2 microgram per cubic meter of air (μg/m3) increase in PM2.5, a range commonly observed across major US cities, on average participants who lived in more polluted areas had the brain volume of someone a year older than participants who lived in less polluted areas. They also had a 46 percent higher risk of silent strokes on MRI.”

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Living near busy roads ‘can raise dementia risk': Exposure to sooty particles alters structure of the brain

April 23rd, 2015 in 2015, Daily Mail, Newsmakers, RESEARCH @ BU, School of Medicine, Sudha Seshadri 0 comments

Seshadri_SDaily Mail
Sudha Seshadri, School of Medicine

Living near congested roads with high levels of air pollution can cause ‘silent strokes’ which increase the risk of dementia, scientists have warned…

Expert quote:

“This is concerning, since we know that silent strokes increase the risk of overt strokes and of developing dementia, walking problems and depression.We now plan to look more at the impact of air pollution over a longer period, its effect on brain shrinkage over time, and other risks including stroke and dementia.”

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A gray matter

April 23rd, 2015 in 2015, Ann McKee, Newsmakers, School of Medicine 0 comments

ann-mckee-300x300NCAA Champion
Ann McKee, School of Medicine

Concussion and its consequences are complex, but fear has surged ahead of science. To catch up, researchers funded by the NCAA and the U.S. Department of Defense teamed up in the largest concussion study in history. They hope to turn anxiety into answers…

Expert quote:

“I’m relieved to see people taking it seriously. There’s a certain level of, I don’t know, it’s just sensationalism or it’s what sells. I think there are times when it’s overblown. I do think we need to be concerned. … Sometimes it goes a little far.”

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Opiate overdoses fall after debut of abuse-resistant OxyContin

April 21st, 2015 in 2015, Marc LaRochelle, Newsmakers, RESEARCH @ BU, School of Medicine 0 comments

Reuters
Marc LaRochelle, School of Medicine

Opiate prescriptions and overdoses in the U.S. have declined since the debut of an abuse-resistant version of the painkiller OxyContin and the market withdrawal of the narcotic Darvon, a study finds…

Expert quote:

“The weight of evidence to date suggests that abuse of OxyContin decreased after the formulation change.”

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Two Years Since Bombing, Marathon Might Be Even More Mental Than Physical

April 20th, 2015 in 2015, Adam Naylor, Boston.com, Kermit Crawford, Newsmakers, School of Education, School of Medicine 0 comments

Boston.com
Kermit Crawford, School of Medicine
Adam Naylor, School of Education

It has been two years since the Boston Marathon bombings…

Expert quotes:

Crawford:

“There can be really an array of feelings of thoughts and of activities that individuals have, in part depending on how directly impacted they were or how they may have experienced something previously.”

Naylor:

“The turn onto Boylston Street will be more emotional than ever. If you understand the psychology of the marathon, it’s the middle that gets tough, and if you add this layer on [since the bombings], you’re going to end up seeing the spots where people were pulled off the course.”

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