Category: Robert Cantu

Brain changes, memory problems seen with minor head bumps

December 11th, 2013 in 2013, Centers & Institutes in the News, NBCNews.com, Newsmakers, Robert Cantu, School of Medicine 0 comments

cantuNBCNews.com
Robert Cantu, School of Medicine, Center for the Study of Traumatic Encephalopathy

Young athletes playing contact sports may experience learning and memory deficits as well as brain changes even when jolts to the head don’t trigger a concussion, a study shows…

Expert quote:

“I think this is the next big bomb to drop. This study shows that you can have brain injury without a recognized concussion. What we don’t know yet is whether the effects are transient or not.”

View full article

Pop Warner Football Participation Declining

November 17th, 2013 in 2013, Centers & Institutes in the News, Newsmakers, Robert Cantu, School of Medicine 0 comments

cantuNPR “Only a Game”
Robert Cantu, School of Medicine, Center for the Study of Traumatic Encephalopathy

In 2010, just under 249,000 kids in the U.S. played Pop Warner football. That number was a record for the organization…

View full article and listen to audio

Column: Goodell teaches moms to tackle ‘safely’

October 30th, 2013 in 2013, Associated Press, Centers & Institutes in the News, Newsmakers, Robert Cantu, School of Medicine 0 comments

cantuAssociated Press
Robert Cantu, School of Medicine, Center for the Study of Traumatic Encephalopathy

NFL Commissioner Roger Goodell came to town to teach mothers how to tackle safely…

Expert quote:

‘‘They haven’t understood the dangers their kids are being subjected to. Once they do — and it won’t happen in weeks, or months, maybe even years — they’ll demand changes.’’

View full article

Concussions and the Classroom

October 27th, 2013 in 2013, Blogs, Centers & Institutes in the News, New York Times, Newsmakers, Robert Cantu, School of Medicine 0 comments

cantuNew York Times
Robert Cantu, School of Medicine, Center for the Study of Traumatic Encephalopathy

Because of heightened awareness about the hazards of sports-related concussions, many states have implemented standards determining when an injured student may resume playing contact sports…

Expert quote:

“The overriding theme is not to exacerbate symptoms.”

View full article

Concussion laws help, but may be only partial solution

October 20th, 2013 in 2013, Centers & Institutes in the News, Newsmakers, Patriot Ledger, Robert Cantu 0 comments

cantuPatriot Ledger
Robert Cantu, School of Medicine, Center for the Study of Traumatic Encephalopathy

In just five years, 49 states have passed laws to raise awareness about concussions and ensure proper treatment of head injuries in young athletes…

Expert quote:

“What we know is scary as hell. That’s probably the best way to phrase it.”

View full article

 

It’s Time for the Doctors to Weigh in on Hockey Fighting

September 13th, 2013 in 2013, Centers & Institutes in the News, Huffington Post, Newsmakers, Robert Cantu, School of Medicine 0 comments

cantuHuffington Post
Robert Cantu, School of Medicine, Center for the Study of Traumatic Encephalopathy

The ongoing debate about whether or not fighting should be part of hockey often seems to just go in circles…

Expert quote:

“In my opinion, they’re just turning their eyes away from a problem they don’t want to address right now. Eventually, they’ll address it … The sheer volume of cases (supporting a link between blows to the head and chronic brain disease) I think is going to just overwhelm anybody that wants to be in denial about the existence of this problem.”

View full article

Creating a safer way to practice high school football

August 4th, 2013 in 2013, Boston Globe, Centers & Institutes in the News, Newsmakers, Robert Cantu, School of Medicine 0 comments

cantuBoston Globe (subscription required)
Robert Cantu, School of Medicine, Center for the Study of Traumatic Encephalopathy

Imagine if someone told you the best way to prepare for a car crash was to be in a series of car crashes each week…

Expert quote:

“The NFL doesn’t have nearly the amount of hitting in practice that high schools do.  The number of hits to the head that a high school player is taking is more than professionals. It’s obviously backwards.”

View full article

Mass. companies team up to prevent head injuries

July 15th, 2013 in 2013, Boston Globe, Centers & Institutes in the News, Newsmakers, Robert Cantu, School of Medicine 0 comments

cantuBoston Globe (subscription required)
Robert Cantu, School of Medicine, Center for the Study of Traumatic Encephalopathy

Many parents and coaches watch their young athletes like a hawk, yet often don’t know when a knock to the head requires more serious attention…

Expert quote:

“The MC10 device is very important because it will allow parents, coaches, and the medical personnel to know how many hits someone is taking over the course of the season.  If someone is taking a high number of hits, you have some decisions to make.”

View full article

Head Trauma Sensors Aim to Measure Concussion Risks

June 19th, 2013 in 2013, Centers & Institutes in the News, Newsmakers, Robert Cantu, School of Medicine 0 comments

cantuTime
Robert Cantu, School of Medicine, Center for the Study of Traumatic Encephalopathy

Over the weekend, Tampa Bay pitcher Alex Cobb was hit in the right ear by a line drive, just weeks after the Toronto Blue Jays Pitcher J.A. Happ was hit in the head by a liner as well…

Expert quote:

“There’s no magic number you can read on a device that means you have a concussion. Many more factors besides forces are involved.”

View full article

 

A Wearable Alert to Head Injuries in Sports

June 18th, 2013 in 2013, Centers & Institutes in the News, New York Times, Newsmakers, Robert Cantu, School of Medicine 0 comments

cantuNew York Times
Robert Cantu, School of Medicine, Center for the Study of Traumatic Encephalopathy

Hard knocks to the head are a constant concern in contact sports — and not just in football or boxing, where recent attention has focused…

Expert quote:

“They give you a rough estimate of total number of hits to the head the person has taken, information of great importance to coaches, parents and athletes themselves. You don’t want to get a high number of hits,” he said, “because there is no hit that is good for your head.”

View full article