Category: Richard Primack

Botanist says plants are flowering earlier due to climate change

July 7th, 2013 in 2013, College and Graduate School of Arts and Sciences, Newsmakers, Richard Primack 0 comments

primack-thoreau1The Redding Pilot
Richard Primack, College of Arts & Sciences

Common plant species are flowering 10 to 14 days earlier in Concord, Mass., compared to over a century ago because of rising temperatures, according to botanist Richard Primack in a talk on June 1 at Highstead…

Expert quote:

“In a very iconic place like Concord, plants are responding to climate change at least in terms of their phenology.”

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A Man for All Seasons

April 21st, 2013 in 2013, College and Graduate School of Arts and Sciences, New York Times, Newsmakers, Richard Primack 0 comments

primack-thoreau1New York Times
Richard Primack, College of Arts & Sciences

On July 4, 1845, Henry David Thoreau moved to a small cabin at Walden Pond, about a mile and a half from his hometown, Concord, Mass…

Expert quote:

“…one thing becomes clear — climate change is coming to Walden Pond.”

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Will Global Warming Slow Down the Boston Marathon?

April 14th, 2013 in 2013, College and Graduate School of Arts and Sciences, Discovery News, Newsmakers, RESEARCH @ BU, Richard Primack 0 comments

primack-thoreau1Discovery News
Richard Primack, College of Arts & Sciences

When the gun goes off to start the Boston Marathon on Monday, the temperature is forecast to be in the 50s — in other words, perfect record-setting weather…

Expert quote:

“By the year 2100, the average temperature at Boston will have changed enough to affect race times.”

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BU study sees temps, not times heating up

April 11th, 2013 in 2013, Boston Herald, College and Graduate School of Arts and Sciences, Newsmakers, RESEARCH @ BU, Richard Primack 0 comments

primack-thoreau1Boston Herald
Richard Primack, College of Arts & Sciences

When Kenya’s Wesley Korir crossed the finish line in last year’s Boston Marathon with a winning time nearly nine minutes behind the pace set in 2011, the reasons seemed to be pretty simple…

Expert quote:

“We always think of sporting events as being constantly improving. We think that people are always going to be breaking records in different events, but in the marathon, what will likely happen is races will start getting slower. We may still have records broken on cold days, but most years they are going to be slower than they presently are.”

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Will climate change slow the Boston marathon?

March 31st, 2013 in 2013, College and Graduate School of Arts and Sciences, Nathan Phillips, Newsmakers, RESEARCH @ BU, Richard Primack 0 comments

primack-thoreau1phillipsPhysOrg
Richard Primack, College of Arts & Sciences
Nathan Phillips, College of Arts & Sciences

In the middle of April, world attention focuses on the Boston Marathon. Researchers from the Biology and Earth and Environment Departments of Boston University have taken a new angle to provide novel insights on this famous running event…

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A Science of Signs of Spring

March 17th, 2013 in 2013, College and Graduate School of Arts and Sciences, Newsmakers, Richard Primack, Wall Street Journal 0 comments

primack-thoreau1Wall Street Journal (subscription required)
Richard Primack, College of Arts & Sciences

To chart the advent of spring, thousands of volunteer naturalists are logging when cherry trees and lilacs first blossom, when Monarch butterflies and hummingbirds fly north, when insects stir and robins nest…

Expert quote:

“We are starting to see dramatic effects across the country and the National Phenology Network is helping to document that.”

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Thoreau, viewed as a scientist

March 10th, 2013 in 2013, Boston Globe, College and Graduate School of Arts and Sciences, Newsmakers, Richard Primack 0 comments

primack-thoreau1Boston Globe (subscription required)
Richard Primack, College of Arts & Sciences

The annual rituals of nature — the date when the marsh marigold first unfurls its yellow petals or when the common alder pushes out its leaves — are among the most sensitive indicators of climate change…

Expert quote:

“As far as I know, there is more information about the effect of climate change in Concord than any other place in the United States.”

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Season creep: Hudson Valley nature preserves point to long-term climate change

February 28th, 2013 in 2013, College and Graduate School of Arts and Sciences, Newsmakers, Richard Primack 0 comments

primack-thoreau1The Journal News
Richard Primack, College of Arts & Sciences

The high temperature on a recent day amid the forest and ridges of the Mohonk Preserve in Ulster County was 29 degrees; the low was 17…

Expert quote:

“The scales are definitely going to be tipped. The climate is changing so rapidly, some species won’t be able to adapt.”

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Rediscovering nature, one ‘lost’ plant species at a time

February 20th, 2013 in 2013, Boston Globe, College and Graduate School of Arts and Sciences, Newsmakers, Richard Primack 0 comments

primack-thoreau1Boston Globe (subscription required)
Richard Primack, College of Arts & Sciences

Bryan Hamlin did not expect to find much of interest when he and his wife, Anne, embarked one Sunday in April 2003 on a walk through the Middlesex Fells Reservation, the large nature preserve near their new house…

Expert quote:

“She will say I’m wrong because there are pitcher plants in Concord, but a species which used to be extremely common is now extremely rare. It’s a difference in perspective.”

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Study shows climate change affecting the butterflies in Massachusetts

February 14th, 2013 in 2013, College and Graduate School of Arts and Sciences, Newsmakers, Plain Dealer, RESEARCH @ BU, Richard Primack 0 comments

primack-thoreau1Plain Dealer
Richard Primack, College of Arts & Sciences

Here is some news that might interest butterfly enthusiasts:…

Expert quote:

“Butterflies are very responsive to temperature in a way comparable to flowering time, leafing out time, and bee flights. However, bird arrival times in the spring are much less responsive to temperature.”

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