Category: Richard Primack

Walden trees

January 24th, 2014 in 2014, College and Graduate School of Arts and Sciences, Newsmakers, RESEARCH @ BU, Richard Primack 0 comments

primack-thoreau1Science Update
Richard Primack, College of Arts & Sciences

Trees described by Henry David Thoreau in Walden are adapting to earlier spring thaws, but face stiff competition from invasive species…

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Study: Walden Pond’s leaf-out times earlier than in Thoreau’s day

January 18th, 2014 in 2014, College and Graduate School of Arts and Sciences, Newsmakers, RESEARCH @ BU, Richard Primack 0 comments

primack-thoreau1Concord Journal
Richard Primack, College of Arts & Sciences

Climate-change studies by Boston University biologists show leaf-out times of trees and shrubs at Walden Pond are an average of 18 days earlier than when Henry David Thoreau made his observations there in the 1850s…

Expert quote:

“By comparing historical observations with current experiments, we see that climate change is creating a whole new risk for the native plants in Concord. Weather in New England is unpredictable, and if plants leaf out early in warm years, they risk having their leaves damaged by a surprise frost.  But if plants wait to leaf out until after all chance of frost is lost, they may lose their competitive advantage.”

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Thoreau’s notes hint: In war of woods, New England trees may lose

January 16th, 2014 in 2014, Blogs, Boston.com, College and Graduate School of Arts and Sciences, Newsmakers, RESEARCH @ BU, Richard Primack 0 comments

primack-thoreau1Boston.com “The Green Blog”
Richard Primack, College of Arts & Sciences

Buried in rows and columns of meticulous notations of 160 years ago, clues left by Henry David Thoreau point to a war of woods in the changing climate that may leave New England forests looking far different than today…

Expert quote:

“The forests will be different. As the climate begins to warm, and we get ever-milder winters and earlier springs, invasive shrubs and trees are poised to take advantage of the situation. Within a half a century– certainly by end of the century– we will see a lot of die-offs of our native species.”

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Thoreau’s Walden Pond warms up

January 16th, 2014 in 2014, College and Graduate School of Arts and Sciences, Newsmakers, RESEARCH @ BU, Richard Primack 0 comments

primack-thoreau1Eco-Business
Richard Primack, College of Arts & Sciences

Walden, where Henry David Thoreau planted beans on land that had yielded only cinquefoil, blackberries, johnswort and sweet wild fruits, is changing…

Expert quote:

“We see that climate change is creating a whole new risk for native plants in Concord. Weather in New England is unpredictable, and if plants leaf out early in warm years, they risk having their leaves damaged by a surprise frost. But if plants wait to leaf out until all chance of frost is lost, they may lose their competitive advantage.”

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Trees at Walden Pond putting out leaves earlier with climate change

January 15th, 2014 in 2014, College and Graduate School of Arts and Sciences, Newsmakers, RESEARCH @ BU, Richard Primack, United Press International 0 comments

primack-thoreau1United Press International
Richard Primack, College of Arts & Sciences

Trees at Walden Pond are leafing almost 18 days earlier than when Henry David Thoreau made observations at the Massachusetts lake in the 1850s, a study found…

Expert quote:

“By comparing historical observations with current experiments, we see that climate change is creating a whole new risk for the native plants in Concord.”

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Thoreau’s Walden is leafing out weeks earlier

January 15th, 2014 in 2014, College and Graduate School of Arts and Sciences, Feature, Futurity News, Newsmakers, RESEARCH @ BU, Richard Primack 0 comments

primack-thoreau1Futurity News
Richard Primack, College of Arts & Sciences

The leaf-out times of trees and shrubs at Walden Pond are an average of 18 days earlier than when Henry David Thoreau made his observations there in the 1850s, a new climate study shows…

Expert quote:

“By comparing historical observations with current experiments, we see that climate change is creating a whole new risk for the native plants in Concord. Weather in New England is unpredictable, and if plants leaf out early in warm years, they risk having their leaves damaged by a surprise frost. But if plants wait to leaf out until after all chance of frost is lost, they may lose their competitive advantage.”

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BU professor adapting biology textbook for other countries

December 24th, 2013 in 2013, Boston Globe, College and Graduate School of Arts and Sciences, Newsmakers, Richard Primack 0 comments

primack-thoreau1Boston Globe (subscription required)
Richard Primack, College of Arts & Sciences

English is the international language of science. Its near-universal use to communicate and disseminate new findings and results has arguably had real benefits, allowing people to gain access to the world’s scientific knowledge by learning a single language…

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Waiting in the wings

December 18th, 2013 in 2013, College and Graduate School of Arts and Sciences, Newsmakers, Richard Primack, The Scientist 0 comments

primack-thoreau1The Scientist
Richard Primack, College of Arts & Sciences

Throughout the 19th and most of the 20th centuries, butterfly collectors in the United Kingdom descended each spring upon fens, forests, and grasslands where prized insects thrived…

Expert quote:

“This is something that there’s been a lot of speculation about—how climate change is affecting food webs. It’s proved to be surprisingly difficult to work on. At this point, people are still trying to document the reality of the mismatch.”

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Oldest Known Fruit Tree In U.S. Still Bears Pears After Nearly 400 Years

August 28th, 2013 in 2013, College and Graduate School of Arts and Sciences, Huffington Post, Newsmakers, Richard Primack 0 comments

primack-thoreau1Huffington Post
Richard Primack, College of Arts & Sciences

A celebrated pear tree in Danvers, Mass. still bears fruit at the ripe old age of 383, more or less — and biologists find its remarkable longevity a bit baffling…

Expert quote:

“Generally, fruit trees don’t last very long, so it’s unusual. It is in relatively open conditions. It’s getting good light… The reason it’s still bearing fruit is because people are pruning it, or it might be a naturally self-pruning tree.”

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9 to 5 is far from reality for scientists

August 21st, 2013 in 2013, College and Graduate School of Arts and Sciences, Newsmakers, Richard Primack 0 comments

primack-thoreau1Times Higher Education
Richard Primack, College of Arts & Sciences

Researchers have long lamented that they are forced to do much of their work late at night or at weekends – and now they have the beginnings of an evidence base to support their claims…

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