Category: Patricia Coogan

Depression linked to asthma risk for black women

April 9th, 2014 in 2014, Centers & Institutes in the News, Futurity News, Newsmakers, Patricia Coogan, RESEARCH @ BU, School of Public Health 0 comments

Patricia-CooganFuturity News
Patricia Coogan, School of Public Health, Slone Epidemiology Center

New research has uncovered a possible link between depression brought on by stress and adult-onset asthma in African-American women…

Expert quote:

“The hypothesized mechanism linking depressive symptoms to asthma incidence is stress and its physiological consequences—particularly, effects on the immune system and the airways.”

View full article

Could Depression be Linked to Asthma in Africa-American Women?

January 23rd, 2014 in 2014, Newsmakers, Patricia Coogan, RESEARCH @ BU, School of Public Health 0 comments

Patricia-CooganScience World Report
Patricia Coogan, School of Public Health, Slone Epidemiology Center

Previous research has shown just how the effects of depression can affect the body…

Expert quote:

“Our results are consistent with positive findings from three previous studies of depressive symptoms and asthma incidence conducted in smaller and primarily white populations. The hypothesized mechanism linking depressive symptoms to asthma incidence is depression-related stress and its physiological consequences, particularly effects on the immune system and the airways. Given the high prevalence of both asthma and of depression in women, the association is of public health importance.”

View full article

Channel Blocker BP Meds Tied to Breast Cancer Risk

August 7th, 2013 in 2013, HealthDay News, Newsmakers, Patricia Coogan, School of Public Health 0 comments

HealthDay News
Patricia Coogan, School of Public Health, Slone Epidemiology Center

Postmenopausal women who use a type of blood pressure-lowering medication called a calcium channel blocker may have increased odds of developing breast cancer, new research suggests…

Expert quote:

“This was a good study, but it doesn’t mean doctors should stop prescribing calcium channel blockers, because it is an observational study. I don’t think women should be concerned yet,” Coogan added. “These findings need to be replicated before anything in clinical practice is undertaken.”

View full article

Long-term use of popular blood pressure drug may raise breast cancer risk

August 6th, 2013 in 2013, Blogs, Boston.com, Centers & Institutes in the News, Newsmakers, Patricia Coogan, School of Public Health 0 comments

Boston.com
Patricia Coogan, School of Public Health, Slone Epidemiology Center

Women taking a common class of drugs to control hypertension—called calcium channel blockers—may more than double their risk for breast cancer if they continue the medication for longer than a decade…

Expert quote:

“The finding raises a hypothesis that should be further studied, but we’re not at the level that people should be panicking if they’re taking calcium channel blockers and getting effective management of hypertension from them.”

View full article

Breast Cancer Risk May Be Increased by Blood Pressure Drugs

August 5th, 2013 in 2013, Bloomberg, Centers & Institutes in the News, Newsmakers, Patricia Coogan, School of Public Health 0 comments

Bloomberg
Patricia Coogan, School of Public Health, Slone Epidemiology Center

Using a type of blood pressure drug for more than a decade may raise breast-cancer risk, a study found, the first potential link between long-term use of the popular medicines and the most common malignancy among women…

Expert quote:

“These findings raise a hypothesis. It does not prove that using calcium-channel blockers for 10 or more years will raise your risk of breast cancer. More observational studies need to look in more populations. If this finding is replicated, then there needs to be a serious discussion about long-term use of calcium-channel blockers.”

View full article

Some Blood Pressure Drugs May Raise Breast Cancer Risk

August 5th, 2013 in 2013, Centers & Institutes in the News, Newsmakers, Patricia Coogan, School of Medicine 0 comments

LiveScience
Patricia Coogan, School of Public Health, Slone Epidemiology Center

Taking one type of high blood pressure medication might increase women’s risk of breast cancer, a new study suggests…

Expert quote:

“This is not the first time that the specter of a link between [calcium-channel blockers] and breast cancer risk has arisen.”

View full article

Researchers Find Link Between Childhood Physical Abuse and Asthma in African Americans

December 18th, 2012 in 2012, Associated Press, Centers & Institutes in the News, Newsmakers, Patricia Coogan, School of Public Health 0 comments

Associated Press
Patricia Coogan, School of Public Health, Slone Epidemiology Center

Researchers have made a connection between childhood abuse suffered by African-American women and asthma which develops later in their lives…

View article

Smart, rich people are thinner than others

August 9th, 2012 in 2012, Centers & Institutes in the News, Examiner.com, Newsmakers, Patricia Coogan, School of Public Health 0 comments

Examiner.com
Patricia Coogan, School of Public Health, Slone Epidemiology Center

The key to achieving and maintaining a healthy weight isn’t about short-term dietary changes according to the CDC…

View article

Education linked to lower obesity levels

August 9th, 2012 in 2012, Centers & Institutes in the News, Newsmakers, Patricia Coogan, School of Public Health, United Press International 0 comments

UPI
Patricia Coogan, School of Public Health, Slone Epidemiology Center

Education may be one way to decrease the risk of becoming overweight or obese, a U.S. researcher suggests…

View article

Pollution tied to disease risk in L.A. black women

January 14th, 2012 in 2012, Newsmakers, Patricia Coogan, Reuters, School of Public Health 0 comments

Reuters
Patricia Coogan, School of Public Health

In a study of more than 4,000 black women in Los Angeles, those who lived in areas with higher levels of traffic-related air pollution were at increased risk of developing diabetes and high blood pressure…

View article