Category: Goldman School of Dental Medicine

Five Dental Choices For Retirees

October 19th, 2014 in 2014, Goldman School of Dental Medicine, Investor's Business Daily, Judith Jones, Newsmakers 0 comments

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Judith Jones, Goldman School of Dental Medicine

Susan Grossman has certainly been through the ringer with dental work. Over the past decade, she’s shelled out some $100,000 for bone replacements, teeth removals and cappings, and most recently, a bridge covering 10 teeth. And there’s still more necessary work ahead…

Expert quote:

“They may be anywhere from one-third to two-thirds of what you’d pay in a dentist’s office.”

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Sirona, Boston Univ. enter into unprecedented agreement on digital dentistry

October 10th, 2014 in 2014, Goldman School of Dental Medicine, Jeffrey Hutter, Newsmakers 0 comments

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Jeffrey Hutter, Goldman School of Dental Medicine

Friday morning, Sirona Dental Systems and the Boston University Henry M. Goldman School of Dental Medicine (GSDM) announced an agreement that will enable GSDM to become the first all-digital dental school in the U.S….

Expert quote:

“This agreement will allow the school to take a leading role in the evolution of evidence-based dentistry.”

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Boston University announces all-digital dental school campus

October 10th, 2014 in 2014, Goldman School of Dental Medicine, Jeffrey Hutter, Newsmakers 0 comments

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Jeffrey Hutter, Goldman School of Dental Medicine

Boston University’s Henry M. Goldman School of Dental Medicine will initiate an all-digital dental school, according to an announcement by the school’s dean, Dr. Jeffrey Hutter…

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How coffee could help you keep your teeth

August 22nd, 2014 in 2014, Futurity News, Goldman School of Dental Medicine, Newsmakers, RESEARCH @ BU 0 comments

Futurity News
Nathan Ng, Goldman School of Dental Medicine

Researchers find that drinking coffee, which is a source of antioxidants, appears to curb tooth loss due to gum disease…

Expert quote:

“We found that coffee consumption did not have an adverse effect on periodontal health, and, instead, may have protective effects against periodontal disease.”

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Coffee Drinkers—Your Gums May Thank You

August 20th, 2014 in 2014, Goldman School of Dental Medicine, News Releases 0 comments

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE: August 15, 2014

Contact: Mary Becotte
Director of Communications & External Relations
Boston University Henry M. Goldman
School of Dental Medicine
617-638-5147, becottem@bu.edu

(Boston) – Coffee contains antioxidants. Antioxidants fight gum disease. Does coffee, then, help fight gum disease?

That is the question researchers at Boston University Henry M. Goldman School of Dental Medicine explored in a study published in the August issue of the Journal of Periodontology.

Lead author and 2014 DMD graduate Nathan Ng said, “We found that coffee consumption did not have an adverse effect on periodontal health, and, instead, may have protective effects against periodontal disease.”

Additional study authors were Drs. Raul Garcia and Elizabeth Kaye. Dr. Garcia is Chair of the Department of Health Policy & Health Services Research and Director of the Northeast Center for Research to Evaluate and Eliminate Dental Disparities. Dr. Kaye is a Professor in the Department of Health Policy & Health Services Research.

Coffee consumption was associated with a small but statistically significant reduction in number of teeth with periodontal bone loss. Researchers concluded that coffee consumption may be protective against periodontal bone loss in adult males—the group examined in the study.

“This is the first long-term study of its kind that has investigated the association between coffee consumption and periodontal disease in humans,” Ng added.

Researchers looked at data collected from 1,152 men in the US Department of Veterans Affairs Dental Longitudinal Study (DLS) during triennial dental visits between 1968 and 1998. The DLS is a prospective study of the oral health of medically healthy male veterans that began in 1968. The men were 98% non-Hispanic white males ages 26 to 84 at the start.

Information on coffee intake was self-reported by the participants. Researchers controlled for risk factors such as alcohol consumption, education, diabetes status, body mass index, smoking, frequency of brushing and flossing, and recent periodontal treatment or dental cleanings.

Researchers suggest exploring their findings in a more diverse study population in the future.

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About Boston University Henry M. Goldman School of Dental Medicine: Founded in 1963, the Boston University Henry M. Goldman School of Dental Medicine is the premier academic dental institution promoting excellence in dental education, research, oral health care, and community service to improve the overall health of the global population. With a faculty of more than 325 educators, clinicians, and researchers and more than 250 staff members, the School offers a full spectrum of pre-doctoral and post-doctoral specialty education programs and a complete range of graduate programs and degrees to more than 700 students.

The Body’s Ecosystem

August 1st, 2014 in 2014, Goldman School of Dental Medicine, Newsmakers, Salomon Amar, The Scientist 0 comments

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Salomon Amar, Goldman School of Dental Medicine

The human body is teeming with microbes—trillions of them. The commensal bacteria and fungi that live on and inside us outnumber our own cells 10-to-1, and the viruses that teem inside those cells and ours may add another order of magnitude…

Expert quote:

“We don’t have the full picture yet, but we understand that there is [a] first layer of microorganisms that allows for the attachment of the second-comers, the third-comers, the fourth, and so on, in a very hierarchical type of organization.”

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Mining the Mouth’s Many Microbes

June 18th, 2014 in 2014, Goldman School of Dental Medicine, Newsmakers, Salomon Amar, The Scientist 0 comments

amar-salomonwebThe Scientist
Salomon Amar, Goldman School of Dental Medicine

The oral cavity contains several distinct and dynamic microbial communities, and some of these commensals may seed the body’s other microbiomes…

Expert quote:

“We don’t have the full picture yet, but we understand that there is [a] first layer of microorganisms that allow for the attachment of the second-comers, the third-comers, the fourth, and so on, in a very hierarchical type of organization.”

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Dental Work in the ER: The MA Pull to Extract It

June 16th, 2014 in 2014, Goldman School of Dental Medicine, Judith Jones, Newsmakers, RESEARCH @ BU 0 comments

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Judith Jones, Goldman School of Dental Medicine

Since severe cuts were made in 2010 to MassHealth adult dental benefits, more Commonwealth residents have turned to emergency rooms, where the pain from tooth and gum ailments is addressed, but the cause often goes untreated…

Expert quote:

“Most of the studies that have documented this have suggested that it’s young adults who have the largest increases. But what we found was when you looked on a percentage basis, it was really older adults and seniors who had the largest increases.”

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People Older Than 100 May Have the Strongest Teeth

June 12th, 2014 in 2014, Goldman School of Dental Medicine, Laura Kaufman, Newsmakers, RESEARCH @ BU 0 comments

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Laura Kaufman, Goldman School of Dental Medicine

People who live to be 100 years old or more are likely in very good health. New research suggests that it all might start in the mouth…

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Controlling biology with biomaterials: David J. Mooney to talk at BU Thursday, March 13

February 14th, 2014 in 2014, Goldman School of Dental Medicine, Health & Medicine, News Releases 0 comments

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE:
February 12, 2014

Contact:  Jackie Simon
Associate Director of Publications & Media Relations
Boston University Henry M. Goldman
School of Dental Medicine
617-638-4892, jackier@bu.edu

(Boston) – There are hundreds of clinical trials of cell therapy currently underway, but simple cell infusions lead to large-scale cell death, little control over cell fate, and a typically poor clinical outcome.

In contrast, biomaterials can be used to serve as cell carriers or attractors of host cell populations, and to then program the cells in vivo. David J. Mooney will discuss the potential of biomaterials to regulate cell biology in processes as diverse as tissue regeneration and therapeutic cancer vaccines in the keynote lecture, “Controlling biology with biomaterials: from bone regeneration to cancer vaccines” from 1 to 2 p.m. on Thursday, March 13, 2014, at Boston University Henry M. Goldman School of Dental Medicine’s Science Day in Hiebert Lounge, 72 East Concord Street, 14th floor.

Science Day is a research celebration featuring posters and oral presentations by pre- and post-doctoral dental students, post-doctoral fellows, and faculty and staff. A dental vendor exhibition runs in conjunction with the research presentations. The event is free and open to the public.

Mooney is the Robert P. Pinkas Family Professor of Bioengineering at Harvard School of Engineering and Applied Sciences. He is a Founding Core Faculty Member, Platform Lead, Programmable Nanomaterials at the Wyss Institute for Biologically Inspired Engineering at Harvard.

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His laboratory is focused on the design and synthesis of biomaterials that regulate the fate of either cells already resident in the body, or transplanted cell populations.

Dr. Mooney earned a BS in Chemical Engineering at the University of Wisconsin and PhD in Chemical Engineering at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. He is a member of the National Academy of Engineering and the Institute of Medicine of the National Academies. He has won numerous research awards, and received the Phi Beta Kappa Prize for Excellence in Undergraduate Teaching and the Everett Mendelsohn Excellence in Mentoring Award from Harvard College. His inventions have been licensed by 11 companies, and he is active on industrial scientific advisory boards.

For more information about Science Day, visit bu.edu/dental/scienceday.

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About Boston University Henry M. Goldman School of Dental Medicine: Founded in 1963, the Boston University Henry M. Goldman School of Dental Medicine is the premier academic dental institution promoting excellence in dental education, research, oral health care, and community service to improve the overall health of the global population. With a faculty of more than 325 educators, clinicians, and researchers and more than 250 staff members, the School offers a full spectrum of pre-doctoral and post-doctoral specialty education programs and a complete range of graduate programs and degrees to more than 700 students.

About Boston University: Founded in 1839, Boston University is an internationally recognized institution of higher education and research. With more than 33,000 students, it is the fourth-largest independent university in the United States. BU consists of 16 schools and colleges, along with a number of multi-disciplinary centers and institutes integral to the University’s research and teaching mission. In 2012, BU joined the Association of American Universities (AAU), a consortium of 62 leading research universities in the United States and Canada.