Category: New Scientist

‘Iron Man’ plants are supercharged by nanotech power

March 16th, 2014 in 2014, College of Engineering, James Collins, New Scientist, Newsmakers 0 comments

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James Collins, College of Engineering

The story of Iron Man, in which a person gains spectacular abilities by infusing their body with technology, is still just fantasy. But the first Iron Plants have been made. A team of biologists and engineers has made bionic plants that have been upgraded with an injection of nanotechnology…

Expert quote:

“This is a marvellous demonstration of how nanotechnology can be coupled with synthetic biology to modify and enhance the function of living organisms. The authors show that self-assembling nanoparticles can be used to enhance the photosynthetic capacity of plants.”

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Soaring drug deaths turn focus on anti-overdose drug

March 8th, 2014 in 2014, Alexander Walley, New Scientist, Newsmakers, School of Medicine 0 comments

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Alexander Walley, School of Medicine

In 1992 Tracey Helton, a long-time heroin addict, shot up. Only this time was different: she had been clean for a month and her body couldn’t handle the opiate surge. The overdose would have killed her, she says, had she not been brought back from the dead by a drug that researchers call miraculous, but that the public largely hasn’t heard of…

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Brain damage in American football linked to head trauma

October 18th, 2013 in 2013, Ann McKee, Centers & Institutes in the News, New Scientist, Newsmakers, School of Medicine 0 comments

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Ann McKee, School of Medicine, Center for the Study of Traumatic Encephalopathy

American Football is a rough game, but the toll it takes on players’ grey matter is only now becoming clear…

Expert quote:

“[Hampshire's team] has found very impressive abnormalities that mirror the areas of the brain that are damaged in early CTE.”

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1 in 13 people have bendy chimp-like feet

May 30th, 2013 in 2013, College and Graduate School of Arts and Sciences, Jeremy DeSilva, New Scientist, Newsmakers, RESEARCH @ BU 0 comments

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Jeremy DeSilva, College of Arts & Sciences

You may be walking on chimp-like feet without knowing it…

Expert quote:

“My guess is that we are getting more variation than ever before, perhaps because shoes have impacted foot anatomy.”

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Prague gas explosion highlights ageing pipeline danger

April 29th, 2013 in 2013, College and Graduate School of Arts and Sciences, Nathan Phillips, New Scientist, Newsmakers 0 comments

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Nathan Phillips, College of Arts & Sciences

A powerful explosion in Prague, Czech Republic, has damaged an office building, leaving up to 40 people injured…

Expert quote:

“For older cities it’s a systemic problem and it needs attention.”

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Our closest ape-like ancestor went back to the trees

April 12th, 2013 in 2013, College and Graduate School of Arts and Sciences, Jeremy DeSilva, New Scientist, Newsmakers, RESEARCH @ BU 0 comments

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Jeremy DeSilva, College of Arts & Sciences

Our closest non-human ancestor lived in South Africa…

Expert quote:

“From a distance I’m not sure one would notice differences between sediba and human walking. But if you could get closer you might notice something. It wouldn’t heel-strike like a modern human does. It would take short, quick steps. And there would also be a tremendous amount of rotation and inward twisting of the foot, knee and hip.”

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Weird high-energy flare made by spitting black hole

January 28th, 2013 in 2013, Alan Marscher, College and Graduate School of Arts and Sciences, New Scientist, Newsmakers, RESEARCH @ BU 0 comments

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Alan Marscher, College of Arts & Sciences

GLOBS of plasma spat out by black holes can trigger the brightest flashes of light in the universe…

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Epidemic of plain packaging to curb smoking uptake

August 23rd, 2012 in 2012, Kevin Outterson, New Scientist, Newsmakers, School of Law 0 comments

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Kevin Outterson, School of Law

Here’s a potential epidemic worth celebrating. Australia’s High Court has upheld ‘plain packaging’ legislation for cigarettes – a move that some say will see the practice sweep through the world…

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Online searches for future linked to economic success

April 11th, 2012 in 2012, College and Graduate School of Arts and Sciences, New Scientist, Newsmakers, RESEARCH @ BU, Tobias Preis 0 comments

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Tobias Preis, College of Arts & Sciences

People in wealthier nations are far more likely to search for information about the future compared with citizens of poorer states, a study of 45 billion Google search queries has revealed…

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Ash traces hint at cave cuisine 1 million years ago

April 2nd, 2012 in 2012, College and Graduate School of Arts and Sciences, Francesco Berna, New Scientist, Newsmakers, Paul Goldberg, RESEARCH @ BU 0 comments

New Scientist
Francesco Berna, College of Arts & Sciences
Paul Goldberg, College of Arts & Sciences

You could call it the original baptism of fire: the moment hominins first began controlling flames…

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