Category: National Geographic

Sitting on a Cliff Vs. Falling Off a Cliff

January 17th, 2015 in 2015, College and Graduate School of Arts and Sciences, National Geographic, Newsmakers, Robinson Fulweiler 0 comments

fulweilerNational Geographic “Phenomena”
Robinson Fulweiler, College of Arts & Sciences

The Steller’s sea cow is gone. This mega-manatee swam the North Pacific for millions of years, and then in the 1700s humans hunted them to extinction…

Expert quote:

“I was really excited to read their paper, and I actually felt good about their conclusions.”

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Fish Smell Like the Coral They Eat—Disguise Is New to Science

December 9th, 2014 in 2014, College and Graduate School of Arts and Sciences, Jelle Atema, National Geographic, Newsmakers 0 comments

jelle-atema-150x136National Geographic
Jelle Atema, College of Arts & Sciences

Now this is one fish that would beat you in a game of hide-and-seek. New research shows coral-dwelling filefish camouflage themselves by not only looking, but alsosmelling like their prey…

Expert quote:

“It’s a clever study design and a nice contribution to the literature on chemical camouflage. They showed that by smelling like coral, filefish can blend in and avoid predators.”

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Devil rays are shockingly fast and deep divers

July 1st, 2014 in 2014, College and Graduate School of Arts and Sciences, Les Kaufman, National Geographic, Newsmakers 0 comments

leskaufman1National Geographic
Les Kaufman, College of Arts & Sciences

The Chilean devil ray is one heck of a swimmer—the fish make surprisingly fast and deep dives into the Atlantic Ocean, a new study says…

Expert quote:

“The discovery that they dive and forage so deep and so regularly, reinforces a slowly growing sense that open ocean creatures utilize a great deal more of the ocean’s volume than we had realized.”

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Spiders Listen to Their Webs

June 5th, 2014 in 2014, College of Engineering, Joyce Wong, National Geographic, Newsmakers 0 comments

joycewongNational Geographic
Joyce Wong, College of Engineering

When the early morning sun glints off droplets of dew on the gossamer strands of a spider web, it creates a visual masterpiece. Now scientists have found that an elaborate silk-woven web is also an acoustic tour de force…

Expert quote:

“This study is fascinating. I’ve worked with spider silk for years, but I’ve never contemplated its sonic properties.”

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Artifact Trove at Egyptian Tomb Illuminates Life Before Pharaohs

May 30th, 2014 in 2014, College and Graduate School of Arts and Sciences, Kathryn Bard, National Geographic, Newsmakers 0 comments

bardNational Geographic
Kathryn Bard, College of Arts & Sciences

A recently discovered tomb at a key Egyptian settlement has yielded the largest trove of artifacts ever found in a tomb there—including a young man’s burned and scattered bones—and is shedding new light on the ancestors of the ..

Expert quote:

“It demonstrates the importance of this cemetery, with its high-status burials. They have some very interesting secondary burials of humans and animals and wooden structures that are unique to Hierakonpolis.”

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Opinion: On Easter, Jesus’ Evolution Tells of Changing America

April 20th, 2014 in 2014, College and Graduate School of Arts and Sciences, National Geographic, Newsmakers, OP-EDs by BU Professors, Stephen Prothero 0 comments

prothero11-150x150National Geographic
By Stephen Prothero, College of Arts & Sciences

Every year, in the Christian calendar, Jesus is born (on Christmas), dies (on Good Friday), and rises from the dead (on Easter). But the popular persona of Jesus has also been born and born again over the course of American history…

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Watch Sodium and Water Levitate and Collide

July 16th, 2013 in 2013, College of Engineering, Glynn Holt, National Geographic, Newsmakers 0 comments

Holt-2010National Geographic
Glynn Holt, College of Engineering

Engineers in Switzerland have successfully levitated both a particle of instant coffee and a droplet of water using high frequency sounds to make them collide…

Expert quote:

“The idea is old, but the application is timely. The oil droplets can coalesce and make bigger droplets which you can more easily get out of the water.”

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A New Feet in Primate Research

June 6th, 2013 in 2013, College and Graduate School of Arts and Sciences, Jeremy DeSilva, National Geographic, Newsmakers, RESEARCH @ BU 0 comments

desilva1National Geographic
Jeremy DeSilva, College of Arts & Sciences

Jeremy DeSilva could see something was afoot. He just couldn’t believe it.

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New Studies Shake Up Human Family Tree

April 12th, 2013 in 2013, College and Graduate School of Arts and Sciences, Jeremy DeSilva, National Geographic, Newsmakers 0 comments

desilvaNational Geographic
Jeremy DeSilva, College of Arts & Sciences

Everybody knows “Lucy.” For nearly four decades, this famous partial skeleton of Australophithecus afarensis, dated to 3.2 million years ago, has been an ambassador for our prehistoric past…

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Earliest Blooms Recorded in U.S. Due to Global Warming

January 16th, 2013 in 2013, College and Graduate School of Arts and Sciences, National Geographic, Newsmakers, RESEARCH @ BU 0 comments

National Geographic “Daily News”
Elizabeth Ellwood, College of Arts & Sciences

You could call them early bloomers:…

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