Category: Keith Hylton

Google May Be Barking Up Wrong Tree With EU Watchdog Plan

November 8th, 2013 in 2013, E-Commerce Times, Keith Hylton, Newsmakers, School of Law 0 comments

khyltonE-Commerce Times
Keith Hylton, School of Law

Google and the European Commission’s delicate negotiations on a settlement regarding the search engine giant’s alleged antitrust violations this week hit an unusual snag: The terms of Google’s second offer were outed on Wednesday, opening them up to unexpected public scrutiny…

Expert quote:

“They are the ones conducting this negotiation with Google and they have responsibility to make sure it is carried out in terms that don’t embarrass anyone or reveal private information.”

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Google Rivals Get Another Shot at EU Antitrust Deal-Busting

October 28th, 2013 in 2013, E-Commerce Times, Keith Hylton, Newsmakers, School of Law 0 comments

Hylton_white_65wE-Commerce Times
Keith Hylton, School of Law

EU regulators are seeking feedback from Google’s rivals and other third parties on the company’s latest attempt to settle antitrust allegations against it on the Continent…

Expert quote:

“I think Google will keep offering concessions until it can get a deal done. If Google does not settle, the next step is a formal ‘statement of objections’ by the European Commission, followed by a finding of a violation, followed by a fine up to 10 percent of Google’s revenue.”

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Apple proposes new terms in e-books battle

August 4th, 2013 in 2013, CNET, Keith Hylton, Newsmakers, School of Law 0 comments

Hylton_white_65wCNET
Keith Hylton, School of Law

Hours after the Department of Justice and 33 U.S. states proposed a set of remedies for Apple following its July loss in the e-books price-fixing case, the company came back with its own set of terms and called the government’s proposals vague, overreaching, and unwarranted…

Expert quote:

“The antitrust laws are pretty clear that you don’t need to support a rival’s business, so there are questions as to whether that has legal grounding. Antitrust is so open-ended, a monitor could rack up enormous fees in the process of monitoring Apple’s compliance with the laws for 10 years.”

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U.S. Judge Rules Apple Colluded on E-Books

July 11th, 2013 in 2013, Keith Hylton, Newsmakers, School of Law, Wall Street Journal 0 comments

Hylton_white_65wWall Street Journal (subscription required)
Keith Hylton, School of Law

Apple Inc. AAPL -0.39% colluded with five major U.S. publishers to drive up the prices of e-books, a federal judge ruled Wednesday in a stern rebuke that threatens to limit the technology company’s options when negotiating future content deals…

Expert quote:

“The U.S. Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia was constrained by the judge’s heavily fact-based opinion and in 2001 upheld many of his inferences.”

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Analysis: Antitrust ruling could temper Apple’s revolutionary zeal

July 11th, 2013 in 2013, Keith Hylton, Newsmakers, School of Law 0 comments

Hylton_white_65wMacworld
Keith Hylton, School of Law

A federal judge’s ruling Wednesday that Apple violated antitrust laws in its dealings with book publishers may limit the ways in which the company strikes deals in other industries going forward…

Expert quote:

“This ruling “introduces a risk that it would face in doing something like that.”

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Apple colluded on e-book prices, judge finds

July 10th, 2013 in 2013, Keith Hylton, Newsmakers, Reuters, School of Law 0 comments

Hylton_white_65wReuters
Keith Hylton, School of Law

In a sweeping rejection of Apple Inc’s strategy for selling electronic books on the Internet, a federal judge ruled that the company conspired with five major publishers to raise e-book prices…

Expert quote:

“What happens next may depend on Amazon. If Amazon feels a need to keep driving e-book prices down to maximize Kindle sales, it could put downward pressure on prices overall, and perhaps help Amazon win market share back.”

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Judge: Apple conspired to raise e-book prices

July 10th, 2013 in 2013, Keith Hylton, Newsmakers, School of Law, USA Today 0 comments

Hylton_white_65wUSA Today
Keith Hylton, School of Law

Apple conspired with five major publishers to illegally raise consumer prices for electronic books in 2010 and will next face a trial to decide how much it owes in damages, a federal judge ruled Wednesday…

Expert quote:

“Apple has good arguments to raise on appeal. But the new problem Apple faces is that the judge’s massive opinion relies so heavily on facts and inferences that an appellate court is unlikely to have room to modify the decision substantially.”

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Apple guilty in e-book conspiracy case, vows appeal

July 10th, 2013 in 2013, AFP, Keith Hylton, Newsmakers, School of Law 0 comments

Hylton_white_65wAFP
Keith Hylton, School of Law

A US judge ruled Wednesday that Apple violated antitrust law in a price-fixing case, saying the company “conspired to restrain trade” with publishers to boost the price of e-books…

Expert quote:

“An appellate court is unlikely to have room to modify the decision substantially.”

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Apple Awaits E-Book Decision With More Suits in Wings

June 22nd, 2013 in 2013, Bloomberg, Keith Hylton, Newsmakers, School of Law 0 comments

Hylton_white_65wBloomberg
Keith Hylton, School of Law

Apple Inc. (AAPL) will find out sometime in the coming weeks whether it’s legally responsible for an alleged scheme to fix prices for electronic books, after an unusual three-week civil antitrust trial in Manhattan…

Expert quote:

“It’s pretty aggressive of Apple to go forward with the case when they judge is saying, ‘Hey you guys might be in trouble here.’”

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How Apple shook up the electronic book market

June 19th, 2013 in 2013, Keith Hylton, Newsmakers, School of Law 0 comments

Hylton_white_65wMacworld
Keith Hylton, School of Law

Apple didn’t try to fix or raise the prices of electronic books when it entered into the market in 2010, according to Apple senior vice president Eddy Cue…

Expert quote:

“The agency model, on its own, doesn’t even raise an antitrust issue, because the seller never owns the book.”

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