Category: John Clarke

Aurora Flare-ups on Jupiter Caused by Volcanic Moon Io

April 29th, 2015 in 2015, College and Graduate School of Arts and Sciences, John Clarke, Newsmakers 0 comments

John-Clarke-2-150x150Space.com
John Clarke, College of Arts & Sciences

Jupiter’s supervolcanic moon Io is apparently responsible for dramatic brightenings of the giant planet’s stunning blue auroras, a new study suggests…

View full article quoting expert John Clarke

The Conversation US – John Clarke

April 24th, 2015 in 2015, College and Graduate School of Arts and Sciences, John Clarke, Newsmakers, OP-EDs by BU Professors, The Conversation US 0 comments

Hubble in pictures: astronomers' top picks

Tanya Hill, Museum Victoria

In this special feature, we have invited top astronomers to handpick the Hubble Space Telescope image that has the most scientific relevance to them. The images they’ve chosen aren’t always the colourful glory shots that populate the countless “best of” galleries around the internet, but rather their impact comes in the scientific insights they reveal.

More

Jubilation as NASA orbiter reaches Mars

September 22nd, 2014 in 2014, College and Graduate School of Arts and Sciences, John Clarke, Nature, Newsmakers 0 comments

John-Clarke-2-150x150Nature
John Clarke, College of Arts & Science

In the end, there were zero minutes of terror for NASA’s latest Mars probe as it closed in on the red planet. After a 10-month, 711-million-kilometre journey, the probe fired its engines flawlessly for 34 minutes and 26 seconds on 21 September, letting itself be gravitationally captured into Martian orbit…

Expert quote:

“This is a global climate change mission for Mars.”

View full article

NASA robotic probe slips into orbit around Mars

September 22nd, 2014 in 2014, College and Graduate School of Arts and Sciences, John Clarke, Newsmakers, Reuters 0 comments

John-Clarke-2-150x150Reuters
John Clarke, College of Arts & Sciences

A NASA robotic spacecraft fired its braking rockets on Sunday, ending a 10-month journey to put itself into orbit around Mars and begin a hunt for the planet’s lost water…

Expert quote:

“By learning the processes that are going on today we hope to extrapolate back and learn about the history of Mars.”

View full article

NASA’s VeSpR Rocket Sneaks A Peek Of Venus Atmoshpere

November 26th, 2013 in 2013, College and Graduate School of Arts and Sciences, John Clarke, Newsmakers, RESEARCH @ BU 0 comments

John-Clarke-2-150x150RedOrbit
John Clarke, College of Arts & Sciences

A NASA rocket being sent up to study the atmosphere of Venus is slated for launch on Monday; just seven days after the space agency launched a probe to study the Martian atmosphere…

Expert quote:

“Venus today has a thick atmosphere that contains very little water, but we think the planet started out with an ocean’s worth of water.”

View full article

Sounding Rocket to Peek at Atmosphere of Venus

November 26th, 2013 in 2013, College and Graduate School of Arts and Sciences, John Clarke, Newsmakers, Science Daily 0 comments

John-Clarke-2-150x150Science Daily
John Clarke, College of Arts & Sciences

A week after launching a new orbiter to investigate the upper atmosphere of Mars, NASA is sending a sounding rocket to probe the atmosphere of Venus…

Expert quote:

“Venus today has a thick atmosphere that contains very little water, but we think the planet started out with an ocean’s worth of water.”

View full article

Next stop, Mars: NASA’s Maven spacecraft blasts off on a 10-month journey

November 18th, 2013 in 2013, College and Graduate School of Arts and Sciences, Computerworld, John Clarke, Newsmakers 0 comments

John-Clarke-2-150x150Computerworld
John Clarke, College of Arts & Sciences

NASA’s Maven spacecraft blasted off from Cape Canaveral Air Force Station today for a 10-month journey to the Red Planet…

Expert quote:

“Scientifically, this is very important. The rovers want to find little things on the surface today, and Maven is interested in the long-term history of Mars. Were the conditions ripe 3 billion years ago for life to have gotten started on Mars? It could be that it had life, maybe bacteria, even before Earth did.”

View full article

With clouds aloft, the only way to see transit of Venus may be via live feed

June 5th, 2012 in 2012, Boston Globe, College and Graduate School of Arts and Sciences, John Clarke, Newsmakers 0 comments

J_ClarkeThumbBoston Globe
John Clarke, College of Arts & Sciences

With a dull dome of gray clouds capping Massachusetts today, people who were hoping to have the rare experience of observing a transit of Venus will likely be thwarted…

View article