Category: Jelle Atema

Baby corals and fish smell their way to the best home

August 21st, 2014 in 2014, College and Graduate School of Arts and Sciences, Jelle Atema, Newsmakers, Science Magazine 0 comments

jelle-atema-150x136Science Magazine
Jelle Atema, College of Arts & Sciences

You know the story: Kids leave home to explore the world, eventually settling down in the greenest pastures they can find. But when these restless youngsters are baby fish and coral larvae, how do they choose the best place to make their new home?…

Expert quote:

“These are fantastic results.”

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Scientists say sharks have much to teach us

August 15th, 2014 in 2014, College and Graduate School of Arts and Sciences, Jelle Atema, Newsmakers 0 comments

jelle-atema-150x136Florida Today
Jelle Atema, College of Arts & Sciences

They rarely get cancer. Their wounds heal much faster than humans’. Their unique skin makes for a low-drag glide through the water that engineers envy. Scientists say sharks have much to teach us: from how we treat illnesses to how to make better ships, undersea robots or even swim suits…

Expert quote:

“I think the most important thing for us is just basic biology. We would really like to know what the shark knows about its environment and how it knows that information.”

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Study Shows Sharks Combine All Their Senses to Hunt

April 3rd, 2014 in 2014, College and Graduate School of Arts and Sciences, Jelle Atema, Newsmakers, RESEARCH @ BU 0 comments

jelle-atema-150x136Latin Post
Jelle Atema, College of Arts & Sciences

A first-of-its-kind study of how sharks hunt has found the long-feared fish are truly complete predators, using all of their senses in an array of different combinations and ways…

Expert quote:

“This is landmark work. Back in 1985, world experts in underwater animal senses met at Mote, and at that time we emphasized that sensory studies were focusing on one animal at a time, one sense at a time, and we needed to start combining this information. Now we have.”

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Mote study sheds light on how sharks feed

April 2nd, 2014 in 2014, College and Graduate School of Arts and Sciences, Jelle Atema, Newsmakers 0 comments

jelle-atema-150x136Herald-Tribune
Jelle Atema, College of Arts & Sciences

Citing a Hollywood movie as reference material can be like relying on Aunt Jemima Lite to lose calories. But every now and then, even big-screen hype can’t help but get it right…

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Scientists amazed by how sharks use senses to hunt

April 2nd, 2014 in 2014, College and Graduate School of Arts and Sciences, Feature, Futurity News, Jelle Atema, Newsmakers, RESEARCH @ BU 0 comments

jelle-atema-150x136Futurity News
Jelle Atema, College of Arts & Sciences

The most detailed ever play-by-play of how sharks hunt prey shows their senses work together from start to finish to get the job done. The research suggests that sharks with different lifestyles may favor different senses, and they can sometimes switch when their preferred senses are blocked. That’s hopeful news for sharks trying to find food in changing, sometimes degraded environments…

Expert quote:

“This is landmark work. Back in 1985, world experts in underwater animal senses met at Mote, and at that time we emphasized that sensory studies were focusing on one animal at a time, one sense at a time, and we needed to start combining this information. Now we have.”

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Jaws, Reconsidered

March 6th, 2014 in 2014, BU Today, College and Graduate School of Arts and Sciences, Feature, Jelle Atema, Newsmakers, RESEARCH @ BU, The Scientist 0 comments

jelle-atema-150x136The Scientist
Jelle Atema, College of Arts & Sciences

Biologist Jelle Atema is putting the sensory capabilities of sharks to the test—and finding that the truth is more fascinating than fiction…

Expert quote:

“A shark can detect a single drop of blood in an Olympic-size swimming pool.”

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Not human but getting closer

September 1st, 2013 in 2013, College and Graduate School of Arts and Sciences, Independent Online, Jelle Atema, Newsmakers 0 comments

jelle-atema-150x136Independent Online
Jelle Atema, College of Arts & Sciences

It may seem uncomfortably close to science fiction, but robots are moving ever nearer to having humanlike abilities to smell, feel and see their surroundings, allowing them to operate more independently and perform some of the dangerous, dirty and dull jobs people don’t want to do…

Expert quote:

“When it comes to a broad, robust exposure in the natural environment and still being able to perform the task,” Atema said, “animals have it all over human engineering.”

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Wake up and smell the reef: Fish larvae sniff their way back home

August 29th, 2013 in 2013, College and Graduate School of Arts and Sciences, Jelle Atema, Newsmakers, RESEARCH @ BU 0 comments

jelle-atema-150x136PhysOrg
Jelle Atema, College of Arts & Sciences

How tiny fish larvae travel away from the reef, then know how to navigate their way back home is a scientific mystery…

Expert quote:

 

“In this collaborative study we expanded our work to demonstrate that the odor responses can also be detected under the field conditions. This establishes for the first time that reef fish larvae discriminate odor in situ.”

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Robots are getting closer to having humanlike abilities and senses

August 5th, 2013 in 2013, College and Graduate School of Arts and Sciences, Jelle Atema, Newsmakers, Washington Post 0 comments

jelle-atema-150x136Washington Post
Jelle Atema, College of Arts & Sciences

The researchers said the “odor-tracking behaviours of animals” could eventually be “applied to other autonomous robots so they can track down smells, and subsequent sources, of environmental spills and leaks when fitted with highly sensitive sensors.”…

Expert quote:

“When it comes to a broad, robust exposure in the natural environment and still being able to perform the task, animals have it all over human engineering.”

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