Category: James Bird

Scientists find Belichick’s explanation plausible

January 26th, 2015 in 2015, Boston Globe, College of Engineering, James Bird, Newsmakers 0 comments

Bird-James-2012pBoston Globe (subscription required)
James Bird, College of Engineering

It’s basic physics, folks. Four of the Boston area’s best scientific minds, zeroing in on the controversy over the Patriots’ use of underinflated footballs, agreed: If you take a ball from a warm place to a cool place, it will lose air pressure…

Expert quote:

“Everything they said doesn’t seem impossible to me. Based on simple ideal-gas-law calculations, I would not be surprised if the Patriots are vindicated. That said, there are many unknowns that can make small differences. . . . ”

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Why you really CAN smell approaching storms: Raindrops release clouds of aerosols that are carried for miles on the wind

January 15th, 2015 in 2015, College of Engineering, Daily Mail, James Bird, Newsmakers 0 comments

Bird-James-2012pDaily Mail
James Bird, College of Engineering

Most people can detect the distinctive fresh, earthy aroma of an approaching rain storm, but now scientists have worked out why…

Expert quote:

“This paper provides an elegant mechanism by which these microbes can be propelled past the stagnant layer of air around them to a place where the breeze can take them elsewhere.”

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Petrichor: Raindrops Release Clouds Of Aerosols On Impact

January 15th, 2015 in 2015, College of Engineering, James Bird, Newsmakers 0 comments

Bird-James-2012pScience 2.0
James Bird, College of Engineering

People love that earthy smell after it rains. It turns out there is a good science reason for it, and it’s been captured using high-speed imaging…

Expert quote:

“I’m impressed by the extent [to which] the authors have unraveled the underlying physics. The aspect of this paper that I find most exciting is that it brings the conversation of bubble-induced aerosol formation from the ocean over to the land. Microbes from soil have been observed high in the atmosphere; this paper provides an elegant mechanism by which these microbes can be propelled past the stagnant layer of air around them to a place where the breeze can take them elsewhere.”

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The science behind the bubbly in champagne

December 31st, 2014 in 2014, Boston Globe, College of Engineering, James Bird, Newsmakers 0 comments

Bird-James-2012pBoston Globe (subscription required)
James Bird, College of Engineering

Most people save the turn of the calendar year for celebration and reflection, but New Year’s Eve doubles as a demonstration of the fact that fascinating, interesting, and even some unsolved scientific questions are often right under our noses…

Expert quote:

“Before I drink, I hold it up and give a toast and that fraction of a second before you take a sip, the thing I like to look at is the stream of bubbles.”

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To Repel Water, Rough Things Up

December 4th, 2013 in 2013, Blogs, College of Engineering, James Bird, Newsmakers, PBS, RESEARCH @ BU 0 comments

Bird-James-2012pPBS Nova Next
James Bird, College of Engineering

We are obsessed with staying dry…

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Using a Rough Surface to Stay Dry

December 3rd, 2013 in 2013, College of Engineering, James Bird, New York Times, RESEARCH @ BU 0 comments

Bird-James-2012pNew York Times
James Bird, College of Engineering

Researchers at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology and Boston University have found a new clue to staying dry, and it has to do with time and texture…

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Try This on For Size: MIT & BU Researchers Create the Most Waterproof Material Ever

November 25th, 2013 in 2013, BostInno, College of Engineering, James Bird, Newsmakers, RESEARCH @ BU 0 comments

Bird-James-2012pBostInno
James Bird, College of Engineering

The wintry, windy weather will leave you longing for the waterproof warmth of Gore-Tex…

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Researchers hatch new way to repel drops

November 25th, 2013 in 2013, Boston Globe, College of Engineering, James Bird, Newsmakers, RESEARCH @ BU 0 comments

Bird-James-2012pBoston Globe (subscription required)
James Bird, College of Engineering

Engineers have long been interested in creating surfaces that can repel water — materials so waterproof that droplets bounce right off…

Expert quote:

“The point is now you know you can do it, it’s really obvious how to do it. And yet you didn’t try that way.”

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Water-Resistance Breakthrough Makes a Splash

November 22nd, 2013 in 2013, College of Engineering, James Bird, Newsmakers 0 comments

Bird-James-2012pTechNewsWorld
James Bird, College of Engineering

Scientists may have just created the most water-resistant artificial material in the world…

Expert quote:

“Perhaps the most straightforward [way to further reduce contact time] would be to design the texture to fracture the drop into more pieces.”

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Super-Dry Surface Allows Water to Bounce Off Easily [Video]

November 21st, 2013 in 2013, College of Engineering, James Bird, Newsmakers 0 comments

Bird-James-2012pNature World News
James Bird, College of Engineering

Massachusetts Institute of Technology researchers have developed a new material that lets water bounce off its surface very easily…

Expert quote:

“We’ve demonstrated that we can use surface texture to reshape a drop as it recoils in such a way that the overall contact time is significantly reduced.”

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