Category: International

New York Times Correspondent Wins Asia Reporting Award from BU

September 21st, 2006 in College of Communication, International, News Releases, University Affairs 0 comments

Contact: Laren Glaser, 617-353-5015 | leglaser@bu.edu

(Boston) – David Barboza, a New York Times correspondent based in Shanghai, is the 2006 recipient of the Hugo Shong Journalist of the Year Award for Reporting on Asia Affairs, given by Boston University’s College of Communication. It is presented to a print journalist who has done the most to advance public insight and understanding of the region in news or feature reporting during the previous year.

Although primarily a business reporter, Barboza also writes on art, film, television, and dance in China, where he has been based since 2004. He was to be presented the $15,000 award by BU alumnus and trustee Hugo X. Shong at a Boston University dinner ceremony Sept. 22. The inaugural Shong Journalist of the Year Award went last year to Peter S. Goodman, Shanghai bureau chief and Asian economic correspondent for the Washington Post.

Barboza graduated from Boston University’s College of Arts and Sciences in 1990 with a bachelor’s degree in history and attended graduate school at Yale University. He was hired by the Times as a staff writer in 1997 and for five years was Midwest business correspondent based in Chicago. He covered the Enron scandal and was part of the team named finalist for a Pulitzer Prize in 2002. He was one of five Times reporters awarded the Gerald Loeb Award for Deadline Writing in 2005 for coverage of Lenovo’s acquisition of I.B.M.’s personal computer business.

A native of China who earned a master’s degree in journalism from BU in 1987, Shong is senior vice president of International Data Group, Inc., and heads its Asian-Pacific operations. IDG is the world’s top technology publisher with 250 magazines and newspapers in 85 countries. Shong received the IDG Chairman’s Award for Entrepreneur of the Year in 2002.

Shong also endowed at the Hugo Shong Lifetime Journalism Achievement Award, the first two recipients being Ted Koppel of ABC’s Nightline and Tom Fiedler, managing editor of the Miami Herald. The $1.6 million for the two annual journalism awards was the largest individual gift endowed to the BU College of Communication, with prizes totaling $50,000 a year — $15,000 for the journalist of the year and $35,000 for the lifetime award.

“Hugo Shong generously endowed this reporting award to encourage and reward journalists who convey to global audiences the importance and impact of events in Asia,” said John Schulz, dean of the BU College of Communications. “David Barboza’s work demonstrates that reporting on economic affairs can be a tool that touches on all aspects of life and society.”

Boston University, with an enrollment of more than 30,000 in its 17 schools and colleges, is the fourth-largest independent university in the United States. The College of Communication has nearly 2,500 students enrolled in the Departments of Journalism; Film and Television; and Mass Communication, Advertising and Public Relations.

Boston University’s Center for English Language & Orientation Programs Welcomes Foreign Fulbright Scholars

July 25th, 2006 in International, News Releases 0 comments

Contact: Erin Whipple, 617-358-1688 | ewhipple@bu.edu

(Boston) – The Center for English Language and Orientation Programs (CELOP) at Boston University is welcoming 65 Fulbright Scholarship winners from around the world to campus this week. The Fulbright Program for non-U.S. students is the U.S. government’s flagship program in international educational exchange. Each year, more than 1,300 individuals worldwide receive grants, based on academic achievement, professional success and leadership potential, to pursue advanced study in the United States.

The Fulbright Scholars will attend CELOP to study English and become acclimated to United States culture in preparation for the advanced degree programs they will enter at universities around the country in the fall. The students come together at CELOP from 36 different countries, including Afghanistan, Brazil, Iraq, Russia, Swaziland and Vietnam. While a majority will attend CELOP for four weeks, others will stay up to nine weeks.

“We are thrilled to have such a large and diverse group of Fulbright Scholars,” said Margot Valdivia, director of CELOP. “CELOP is committed to international education by providing the opportunities to students that result in global understanding and goodwill. By entering our program, we will work to ensure that the students develop strong English language skills that will allow them to be successful in the classroom, but we will also focus on introducing them to life in the United States.”

Valdivia is very familiar with the Fulbright Program, having previously studied abroad in Lima, Peru, on a Fulbright Scholarship. Several other CELOP faculty members also received this honor.

Upon arriving on campus, the Fulbright Scholars will participate in CELOP’s weeklong orientation program, where they will receive coaching in a number of important areas, including setting up email, opening bank accounts, writing checks, using cell phones, riding the T and staying safe in Boston.

“We understand that for many students, CELOP is their first experience in the United States, so we go to great lengths to take care of them,” said Valdivia. “Our faculty and staff are very dedicated, and students receive of one-on-one attention.”

Aside from living together as a group, the Fulbright Scholars will be fully integrated into regular CELOP programs. They will be placed in English classes with other CELOP students of similar language skill levels. They will also be able to choose electives, such as courses on American culture, academic writing and pronunciation, based on their interests. In addition, they will have the opportunity to participate in CELOP special interest clubs, which consist of regular discussions about various short stories and “sitcoms,” offering a unique way for students to learn about American pop culture.

CELOP will also provide the Fulbright Scholars with opportunities to enjoy life in Boston, meet Americans, and practice their English outside the classroom. Boston Trolley Tours and group trips to the Museum of Fine Arts, Fenway Park and other city locations are frequent activities, and CELOP students are encouraged to join the BU community on trips, through the SummerFest program, to destinations including Martha’s Vineyard and Newport, R.I.

CELOP, the intensive English language program at Boston University, has been teaching English language and culture to international students for over 30 years. CELOP is among the world’s leading English language centers and is accredited by the Commission on English Language Program. Visit www.bu.edu/celop for more information.

UN Secretary General Praises Boston University’s African Presidential Archives and Research Center

May 18th, 2006 in College and Graduate School of Arts and Sciences, Humanities/Social Science, International, News Releases 0 comments

Contact: Richard Taffe, 617-353-4626 | rtaffe@bu.edu
Contact: Zoe Smoke, 617-353-5452 | zsmoke@bu.edu

(Boston) — United Nations Secretary General Kofi Annan has praised BU’s African Presidential Archives and Research Center (APARC) for encouraging developing democracies on the African continent.

APARC Director Charles Stith, a former U.S. ambassador to Tanzania, briefed Annan upon returning from APARC’s annual African Presidential Roundtable in Johannesburg, South Africa, which was attended last month by 10 African former presidents.

“I very much appreciate your willingness to come to New York to brief me,” Annan wrote to Stith. “Hopefully, the focus of the deliberations will yield some strategic responses to the urgent challenges of peace, security and development facing Africa.”

Annan said that beyond the Roundtable, “APARC’s mission to chronicle contemporary trends and developments in Africa by engaging former African heads of state is a unique and important contribution to encouraging democratization on the continent. I commend Boston University and you for this exemplary initiative.”

Stith founded APARC to complement BU’s African Studies program — one of the nation’s oldest, established in 1953. It organizes forums regarding Africa’s global relationships, and hosts a residency program for African former heads of state.

“I accept the Secretary General’s words as a compliment to our work in developing APARC,” said Stith, “and as a testament to the legacy of excellence in African studies at Boston University.”

Founded in 1839, Boston University is the fourth largest independent university in the United States, with more than 30,000 students in its 17 colleges and schools. BU has established an international reputation for excellence in teaching and conducting research on Africa, and has built and maintained broad collaborations with institutions in Africa.

Note to Editor: For more on APARC visit http://www.bu.edu/aparc.

Ambassador Charles Stith, APARC director
Ambassador Charles Stith, APARC director

BU Alumnus and Best-Selling Author Nicholas Gage Addresses Graduating International Students

May 13th, 2006 in Commencement, International, News Releases, University Affairs 0 comments

Contact: Erin Whipple, 617-358-1688 | ewhipple@bu.edu

(Boston) – Last Thursday afternoon at the Metcalf Trustee Center, the Boston University Office of Development and Alumni Relations held a reception to recognize and celebrate the international graduates of the Class of 2006.

The event featured an address by honored guest and Boston University alumnus, Nicholas Gage (COM `63, HON `85). Born in Greece, Gage is a prize-winning investigative reporter and former foreign correspondent for the New York Times, as well as the author of seven books. One of the books, “Eleni,” received a National Book Critics Circle’s nomination for best biography, was awarded first prize by the Royal Society of Literature of Great Britain in 1984, and was also made into a motion picture. “Eleni” is the story of Gage’s mother, whose death during the Greek Civil War allowed her three children to emigrate to the United States. Gage has also established a scholarship at BU in his mother’s name.

After extending his congratulations to the international graduates in multiple languages, Gage went on to offer his thoughts on how the graduates will leave BU with a unique world perspective, stating that “Boston University has provided you with the opportunity to choose from the best of two worlds – America, and your own. What you have found valuable, take with you, and draw from.” He also warned that the end of education “does not mean that life will be smooth sailing” and that “all lives are filled with challenges, opportunities, thrills and disappointments.” Drawing from his own experience of the difficult voyage he made to America, Gage acknowledged that “adversity can be a blessing, since this is when you learn most about life and yourself.”

Continuing with advice for the international graduates, Gage shared two important insights. The first was that most people do not work at their full potential and thus, “a little extra effort can make a great difference.” To illustrate this point, he spoke of how the little extra effort he put in to uncover a fact while reporting on a story as a student at BU ultimately opened the door for him at the New York Times. His final message was that personal relationships and love should come above all else. As Gage stated that he came to truly understand while on the journey to uncover the truth behind his mother’s death, “no material success will mean as much as the love that you give and receive. In the end, that is what counts, and that is where you will find the greatest satisfaction.”

The reception attracted over 200 guests, including graduating students and their parents, representing 46 different nations, as well as prominent Boston University officials, including Provost David Campbell and President Emeritus John Silber.

The message to the international graduates from the University was loud and clear: Stay connected to BU, no matter where you go from here. Executive Director of Alumni Relations, Meg Umlas, welcomed the Class of 2006 to the BU alumni family, and encouraging their active participation in the BU alumni associations in the United States, and around the world. Umlas also provided insight into the benefits of leveraging connections with Boston University for the purposes of professional networking, as well as remaining in contact with friends, and other BU affiliates. Provost Campbell echoed these sentiments, stating that the graduates “will always be a part of Boston University.”

The event ended with Gage presenting graduating student raffle winners with autographed copies of his books. All international members of the Class of 2006 also received passport holders as graduation gifts from Boston University, to aid them in their future world travels.

Nicholas Gage (COM `63, HON `85)
Nicholas Gage (COM `63, HON `85)

Boston University’s Stith to Receive Honorary Degrees

May 2nd, 2006 in College and Graduate School of Arts and Sciences, Humanities/Social Science, International, News Releases 0 comments

Contact: Richard Taffe, 617-353-4626 | rtaffe@bu.edu
Contact: Zoe Smoke, 617-353-5452 | zsmoke@bu.edu

(Boston) — Former U.S. Ambassador Charles Stith, director of the African Presidential Archives and Research Center at Boston University, will receive honorary degrees this month from two prominent southern universities in recognition of a career as a minister, civil rights activist, and civil servant.

Stith will receive an honorary doctorate May 5 from the University of South Carolina at commencement ceremonies in Columbia, S.C. University President Andrew Sorensen said Stith’s “career as minister, his thoughtful writings, service to our country, and leadership in establishing the African Presidential Archives and Research Center at Boston University represent an amalgam of service that is worthy of the persons the university holds up before its graduates and families.”

On May 15 Stith will be given an honorary doctorate and deliver the commencement address at Clark Atlanta University, one of the nation’s premier historically black colleges. CAU President Walt Broadnax cited Stith’s career as Ambassador to Tanzania and as a civil rights activist as the basis for the university bestowing the honor.

A Harvard University Divinity School graduate, Stith was senior minister of the Union United Methodist Church in Boston, and founder and national president of the Organization for a New Equality (O.N.E.), which seeks to expand economic opportunities for minorities and women. He served as President Clinton’s ambassador to Tanzania in the traumatic period after the 1998 bombing of the U.S. embassy in Dar es Salaam.

Stith founded APARC to complement BU’s African Studies program — one of the nation’s oldest, established in 1953. It chronicles trends and developments related to democratization and free-market reform in Africa, organizes forums regarding Africa’s global relationships, and hosts a residency program for African former heads of state.

Founded in 1839, Boston University is the fourth largest independent university in the United States, with more than 30,000 students in its 17 colleges and schools. BU has established an international reputation for excellence in teaching and conducting research on Africa, and has built and maintained broad collaborations with institutions in Africa.

For more information on APARC visit http://www.bu.edu/aparc.

Afghan Women’s Health and Human Rights Activist Sima Samar to Visit Boston University as Distinguished Scholar

April 11th, 2006 in Health & Medicine, International, News Releases, School of Public Health 0 comments

Contact: Kira Jastive, 617-358-1240 | kjastive@bu.edu

(Boston) – The Global Health Initiative (GHI) at Boston University and the BU School of Public Health announced today that Dr. Sima Samar, chair of the Afghan Independent Human Rights Commission, has been chosen as a Distinguished Visiting Scholar in Global Health and will spend time on BU’s Medical campus in May and the university’s Charles River campus when she returns in October. While at BU next month, Dr. Samar will deliver a lecture titled, “The Hidden War: Obstacles to Healthcare for Afghan Women,” on Tuesday, May 9, 5:15 p.m., 670 Albany Street, Boston. The event is free and open to the public. During her visits, she will also meet with faculty, students and staff to bring to the forefront the health and human rights challenges that face Afghan women and children.

A leading authority on these issues in her country, Samar founded the Shuhada Organization in 1989 to implement innovative programs in health, education, construction, and income generation that improve the lives of women and children in Afghanistan and those living as refugees in Pakistan. The Shuhada Organization has grown to become the largest female-led non-government organization in Afghanistan and operates an extensive network of hospitals, clinics, schools and shelters as well as numerous other programs and services for women and children. For more information about the organization, please visit www.shuhada.org.

“Boston University is honored to host Dr. Samar as a visiting scholar,” said Gerald T. Keusch, M.D., associate dean of Global Health, BU School of Public Health, and director of the Global Health Initiative. “Her work to improve the lives and healthcare for Afghan women and children under extraordinarily difficult conditions has made her an icon in global health and her efforts will ideally lead to new policies that will advance the country’s medical and education infrastructure.”

The recipient of numerous honors and awards, including the 2004 Jonathan Mann Award for Health and Human Rights, Samar is an international symbol of the steadfast courage required to demand basic human rights for women and children in Afghanistan.

In addition to directing the Shuhada Organization, Samar served as the country’s first Minister of Women’s Affairs during the interim government, leading the effort to restore economic, political, legal and social rights to women. In her current role as Chair of the Afghan Independent Human Rights Commission, she oversees the conduct of human rights education programs across the country, implementation of a nationwide women’s rights education program, and monitoring and investigation of human rights abuses.

The Global Health Initiative at Boston University was established to promote multi-disciplinary research, education, outreach and policy studies across and beyond the Boston University community, and to contribute to reducing disparities in health through the generation of new knowledge, the education of students as “global citizens,” and the development of partnerships with global health leaders, scholars, and practitioners around the world. The GHI Distinguished Visiting Scholar in Global Health Program provides a framework for developing important new collaborations and partnerships between BU and leaders in health and science across the globe.

The Boston University School of Public Health is one of the nation’s leading graduate schools of public health, preparing practitioners and scientists for careers that promote health among underserved populations locally and around the world.

Founded in 1839, Boston University is an internationally recognized institution of higher education and research. With more than 30,000 students, it is the fourth largest independent university in the United States. BU contains 17 colleges and schools along with a number of multi-disciplinary centers and institutes which are central to the school’s research and teaching mission.

Event:
“The Hidden War: Obstacles to Healthcare for Afghan Women,” featuring Dr. Sima Samar

Date:
Tuesday, May 9, 2006

Time:
5:15 p.m.

Place:
670 Albany Street
Boston, MA

For more information, contact: John Douglas at 617-414-1440, or johnd@bu.edu

Boston University Hosts Forum to Address U.S. Administration Policy and Strategy in Iraq

March 17th, 2006 in College and Graduate School of Arts and Sciences, Humanities/Social Science, International, News Releases 0 comments

Contact: Tom Testa, 617/353-2240 | ttesta@bu.edu

(Boston) — Approaching the third anniversary of the U.S.-led invasion of Iraq, the threat of civil war and continued violence against coalition forces has aroused questions about the conduct of the war. For some answers, Boston University will host a forum on Wednesday, March 29, featuring three high-level administration policy advisors.

“War in Iraq: How’s it Going?” will include Peter W. Rodman, Assistant Secretary of Defense for International Security Affairs; James Jeffrey, senior advisor for Iraq to the Secretary of State; and Lt. Gen. James T. Conway, director of operations for the Joint Chiefs of Staff.

Following opening remarks by BU Provost David Campbell, Professor Uri Ra’anan, director of the BU Institute for the Study of Conflict, Ideology & Policy, will introduce the panel. Professor Husain Haqqani, director of the BU Center for International Relations, will moderate. Free and open to the public, the discussion is co-sponsored by the Center and the Institute.

Rodman, as Assistant Secretary of Defense for International Security Affairs since July 2001, is responsible for advising the Secretary on formulation and coordination of international security strategy and policy in East and South Asia, the Middle East and Persian Gulf, Africa, and Latin America.

Jeffrey, who has served as senior advisor to the Secretary of State and coordinator for Iraq since August 2005, is responsible for developing, coordinating, and leading implementation of policy on Iraq.

Conway, who serves as Director of Operations, J-3, on the Joint Staff, has a wealth of operational experience, including two combat tours in Iraq.

Event:
“War in Iraq: How’s it Going?”

Date:
Wednesday, March 29, 2006

Time:
10:30 a.m. to noon

Place:
Boston University
School of Management
Executive Leadership Center, 4th floor
595 Commonwealth Ave.

Nobel Peace Prize Winner Wangari Maathai to Speak at Boston University

March 15th, 2006 in International, News Releases 0 comments

Contact: Kira Jastive, 617-358-1240 | kjastive@bu.edu

(Boston) – Dr. Wangari Maathai, winner of the 2004 Nobel Peace Prize for her work to reverse African deforestation, will speak at Boston University on Wednesday, March 22, 6:00 p.m. at the Metcalf Trustee Center, One Sherborn Street, Boston.

Dr. Maathai established the Green Belt Movement (GBM) in 1977 as a grassroots, non-governmental organization focused on environmental conservation, community development and capacity building. Its mission is to create a society of people who consciously work for continued improvement of their environment and a greener, cleaner Kenya.

The GBM has used tree planting to realize its vision and mission across Kenya. While this has been the focal activity, GBM programs have expanded to include projects in civic education, advocacy, food security, greenbelt eco-safaris, and women and change. The movement has been responsible for planting more than 30 million trees on farms and in school and church compounds and empowering communities to enhance their quality of life.

“Boston University is honored to host Dr. Maathai,” said Boston University Provost David Campbell. “Her efforts to bring environmental awareness and change to the people of Kenya are a testament to how one voice can unite millions, and her message of preservation and conflict resolution can educate us all.”

Through her leadership in solving local challenges, Dr. Maathai has become a major political figure in Kenya. In 2002 she was elected to the country’s parliament and appointed by President Mwai Kibabi as Assistant Minister of Environment, Natural Resources and Wildlife the following year.

Dr. Maathai obtained a B.S. in Biology from Mount St. Scholastica College in Atchison, Kansas, an M.S. in Biological Sciences from the University of Pittsburgh, and pursued doctoral studies in Germany and the University of Nairobi before obtaining her Ph.D. in Anatomy from the University of Nairobi. Maathai was active in the National Council of Women of Kenya (NCWK) from 1976 to 1987 and served as its chairperson from 1981 to 1987. It was in 1976, while serving in the NCWK, that she introduced the idea of tree planting to help women improve their environment, communities, and lives.

Founded in 1839, Boston University is an internationally recognized institution of higher education and research. With more than 30,000 students, it is the fourth largest independent university in the United States. BU contains 17 colleges and schools along with a number of multi-disciplinary centers and institutes which are central to the school’s research and teaching mission.

Event: “Preserving the Planet, Preventing Conflict,” featuring Dr. Wangari Maathai, founder of the Green Belt Movement and 2004 Nobel Peace Prize winner

Date: Wednesday, March 22, 2006

Time: 6:00 p.m.

Place: The Metcalf Trustee Center
One Sherborn Street, 9th Floor
Boston, MA

Note to editors: Event is by invitation only, but open to interested media

Largest Crater in the Sahara Discovered by Boston University Scientists

March 3rd, 2006 in College and Graduate School of Arts and Sciences, International, News Releases, Science & Technology 0 comments

Contact: Kira Jastive, 617-358-1240 | kjastive@bu.edu

(Boston) – Researchers from Boston University have discovered the remnants of the largest crater in the Sahara, which may have been formed by a meteorite impact tens of millions of years ago. Dr. Farouk El-Baz made the discovery while studying satellite images of the Western Desert of Egypt with his colleague, Dr. Eman Ghoneim, at BU’s Center for Remote Sensing.

The double-ringed crater – which has an outer rim surrounding an inner ring – is approximately 31 kilometers in diameter. Prior to the latest finding, the Sahara’s biggest known crater, in Chad, measured just over 12 kilometers. According to El-Baz, the Center’s director, the crater’s vast area suggests the location may have been hit by a meteorite the entire size of the famous Meteor (Barringer) Crater in Arizona which is 1.2 kilometers wide.

El-Baz named his find “Kebira,” which means “large” in Arabic and also relates to the crater’s physical location on the northern tip of the Gilf Kebir region in southwestern Egypt. The reason why a crater this big had never been found before is something the scientists are speculating.

“Kebira may have escaped recognition because it is so large – equivalent to the total expanse of the Cairo urban region from its airport in the northeast to the Pyramids of Giza in the southwest,” said Dr. El-Baz. “Also, the search for craters typically concentrates on small features, especially those that can be identified on the ground. The advantage of a view from space is that it allows us to see regional patterns and the big picture.”

The researchers also found evidence that Kebira suffered significant water and wind erosion which may have helped keep its features unrecognizable to others. “The courses of two ancient rivers run through it from the east and west,” added Ghoneim.

The terrain in which the crater resides is composed of 100 million year-old sandstone – the same material that lies under much of the eastern Sahara. The researchers hope that field investigations and samples of the host rock will help in determining the exact age of the crater and its surroundings.

Kebira’s shape is reminiscent of the many double-ringed craters on the Moon, which Dr. El-Baz remembers from his years of work with the Apollo program. Because of this, he believes the crater will figure prominently in future research in comparative planetology. And, since its shape points to an origin of extraterrestrial impact, it will likely prove to be the event responsible for the extensive field of “Desert Glass” – yellow-green silica glass fragments found on the desert surface between the giant dunes of the Great Sand Sea in southwestern Egypt.

Dr. El-Baz is research professor and Director of the Center for Remote Sensing at Boston University. He is a renowned geologist who over the past 30 years has conducted studies in all the major deserts of the world. He is a member of the U.S. National Academy of Engineering and a Fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Sciences and the Geological Society of America. The latter established the “Farouk El-Baz Award for Desert Research” to reward excellence in arid land studies.

Dr. Eman Ghoneim is a research associate at the Center for Remote Sensing. She is an expert in hydrological modeling and now conducts research on arid land geomorphology with emphasis on groundwater concentration under the direction of Dr. El-Baz.

The Boston University Center for Remote Sensing is a research facility that was established in 1986. Researchers at the Center apply techniques of remote sensing and geographic information systems (GIS) to research in the fields of archaeology, geography and geology. In 1997, the Center was recognized by NASA as a “Center of Excellence in Remote Sensing.”

Founded in 1839, Boston University is an internationally recognized institution of higher education and research. With more than 30,000 students, it is the fourth largest independent university in the United States. BU contains 17 colleges and schools along with a number of multi-disciplinary centers and institutes, which are central to the school’s research and teaching mission.

Note to editors: Images available online here

NOTE LOCATION CHANGE: Bill Clinton to Lead BU Africa Forum

February 27th, 2006 in International, News Releases 0 comments

Contact: Richard Taffe, 617-353-4626 | rtaffe@bu.edu
Contact: Kari AlSherif, 617-353-5452 | kalsheri@bu.edu

Former President Bill Clinton will lead a transcontinental dialogue with students at seven universities and colleges in Africa and the United States linked in a videoconference on “Africa and the Global Community,”on Wednesday, March 1, sponsored by Boston University’s African Presidential Archives and Research Center (APARC).

Participating schools include Boston University, the University of Ghana at Legon, the University of the Witwatersrand in South Africa, the University of Dar es Salaam in Tanzania, Morehouse College in Georgia, and North Carolina’s Elizabeth City State University – all members of the APARC American-African Universities Collaborative – plus the Clinton School of Public Service at the University of Arkansas in Little Rock.

The 2-hour event open to the media at the Boston University School of Management, 9th floor Trustees’ Ballroom. (NOTE: Clinton will be at his New York home, linked into the videoconference; for advance interviews, contact Sarah Hamilton, Clinton Foundation, 212-348-0251.)

“One major objective of the American-African Universities Collaborative is to help mold the next generation of leaders,” said Charles Stith, APARC director and former U.S. Ambassador to Tanzania, who will moderate the event from Johannesburg. “What better example is there than President Bill Clinton, one of the most formidable leaders of this generation.”

APARC was established to complement BU’s African Studies program — one of the nation’s oldest, established in 1953 — to chronicle current trends and developments related to democratization and free-market reform in Africa. In addition to hosting a residency program for African former heads of state, it encourages a multidisciplinary approach to teaching about Africa, and organizes forums for African leaders to engage other public and private sector leaders regarding Africa’s global relationships.

Founded in 1839, Boston University is the fourth largest independent university in the United States, with more than 30,000 students in its 17 colleges and schools. BU has established an international reputation for excellence in teaching and conducting research on Africa, and has built and maintained broad collaborations with institutions in Africa.

For more information on APARC visit http://www.bu.edu/aparc.

Event: “Africa and the Global Community,” an interactive videoconference featuring former U.S. President Bill Clinton, sponsored by the Boston University’s African Presidential Archives and Research Center (APARC)

Date: Wednesday, March 1, 2006, 11 a.m. to 1 p.m. EST

Place: Trustees’ Ballroom (9th floor)
Boston University School of Management
595 Commonwealth Ave., Boston