Category: Humanities/Social Science

Boston University Professor Co-Directs "Costs of War" Project

June 29th, 2011 in College and Graduate School of Arts and Sciences, Humanities/Social Science, News Releases 0 comments

Contact: Richard Taffe, 617-353-4626 | rtaffe@bu.edu

(Boston/Providence, R.I.) — Nearly 10 years after the declaration of the War on Terror, the wars in Afghanistan, Iraq, and Pakistan have killed at least 225,000 people, including men and women in uniform, contractors, and civilians. The wars will cost Americans between $3.2 and $4 trillion, including medical care and disability for current and future war veterans, according to a new report by the Eisenhower Research Project based at Brown University’s Watson Institute for International Studies and co-directed by Boston University political science Professor Neta Crawford. If the wars continue, they are on track to require at least another $450 billion in Pentagon spending by 2020.

The group’s “Costs of War” project, which involved more than 20 economists, anthropologists, lawyers, humanitarian personnel, and political scientists, provides new estimates of the total war cost as well as other direct and indirect human and economic costs of the U.S. military response to the 9/11 attacks. The project is the first comprehensive analysis of all U.S., coalition, and civilian casualties, including U.S. contractors. It also assesses many of the wars’ hidden costs, such as interest on war-related debt and veterans’ benefits.

Catherine Lutz, the Thomas J. Watson Jr. Family Professor of Anthropology and International Studies at Brown University, co-directs the Eisenhower Research Project with Crawford, a 1985 Brown graduate.

Among the group’s main findings:

• The U.S. wars in Afghanistan, Iraq, and Pakistan will cost between $3.2 and $4 trillion, including medical care and disability for current and future war veterans. This figure does not include substantial probable future interest on war-related debt.

• More than 31,000 people in uniform and military contractors have died, including the Iraqi and Afghan security forces and other military forces allied with the United States.

• By a very conservative estimate, 137,000 civilians have been killed in Iraq and Afghanistan by all parties to these conflicts.

• The wars have created more than 7.8 million refugees among Iraqis, Afghans, and Pakistanis.
• Pentagon bills account for half of the budgetary costs incurred and are a fraction of the full economic cost of the wars.

• Because the war has been financed almost entirely by borrowing, $185 billion in interest has already been paid on war spending, and another $1 trillion could accrue in interest alone through 2020.

• Federal obligations to care for past and future veterans of these wars will likely total between $600-$950 billion. This number is not included in most analyses of the costs of war and will not peak until mid-century.

Human costs

“There are many costs and consequences of war that cannot be quantified, and the consequences of wars don’t end when the fighting stops,” Crawford said. “The Eisenhower study group has made a start at counting and estimating the costs in blood, treasure, and lost opportunities that are both immediately visible and those which are less visible and likely to grow even when the fighting winds down.”

“This project’s accounting is important because information is vital for the public’s democratic deliberation on questions of foreign policy,” said Lutz. “Knowing the actual costs of war is essential as the public, Congress and the President weigh the drawdown of troops in Afghanistan, and other areas including the deficit, security, public investments, and reconstruction.”

The Eisenhower Research Project is a new, nonpartisan, nonprofit, scholarly initiative that derives its purpose from President Eisenhower’s 1961 farewell address, in which he warned of the “unwarranted influence” of the military-industrial complex and appealed for an “alert and knowledgeable citizenry” as the only force able to balance the often contrasting demands of security and liberty in the democratic state.

The Costs of War has released its findings online, at http://www.costsofwar.org, to spur public discussion about America at war.

Acclaimed Writer Walter Mosley to Speak at Boston University

March 15th, 2011 in Arts, BU In the Community, Entertainment, Humanities/Social Science, News Releases 0 comments

Contact: Lauren Davalla, 617-358-1688 | davalla@bu.edu

(Boston) – The Friends of the Libraries at Boston University will host an evening with celebrated writer Walter Mosley. Mosley is the author of more than 34 critically acclaimed books, including the bestselling mystery series featuring Easy Rawlins and Devil in the Blue Dress, which was adapted as a film starring Denzel Washington. Mosley has been the recipient of the O. Henry Award, a Grammy and PEN America’s Lifetime Achievement Award. Prizes for the prestigious Lawrence G. Blackmon Student Book Collecting Contest will be awarded before the lecture.

Event Details
Event:
The Friends Speaker Series Featuring Walter Mosley
Hosts: The Howard Gotlieb Archival Research Center
Date: Wednesday, April 20, 2011
Time: 5:30 PM reception, 6:00 PM lecture
Location: Metcalf Hall (2nd Floor of George Sherman Union, 775 Commonwealth Avenue, Boston)
Admission: Free to Friends of the Libraries members and BU students, $25 per person for the public
Contact: RSVP to 617-353-3697
For more information, please call 617-353-3696 or visit http://www.bu.edu/archives

Walter Mosley’s work has been translated into 21 languages and includes literary fiction, science fiction, political monographs, and a young adult novel. His short fiction has been widely published, and his nonfiction has appeared in The New York Times Magazine and The Nation, among other publications. Mosley’s most recent work includes The Last Days of Ptolemy Grey, published in November 2010, and the third novel in his Leonid McGill series, When the Thrill Is Gone, published in March 2011.

The Howard Gotlieb Archival Research Center at Boston University seeks to capture and document history by collecting the manuscripts from individuals who play significant roles in the fields of journalism, poetry, literature and criticism, dance, music, theater, film, television, and political and religious movements. The Center strives to preserve the documents and make them readily available to researchers while administering all legal copyrights and restrictions. The Center also presents extensive exhibitions, seminars and tours for students, parents, alumni, various visiting groups and members of the public. For more information, visit www.bu.edu/archives.

Boston University to Host Pulitzer Prize-Winner Isabel Wilkerson for Book Discussion and Signing

November 10th, 2010 in College of Communication, Humanities/Social Science, News Releases 0 comments

Contact: Kira Jastive, 617-358-1240 | kjastive@bu.edu

(Boston) – The Boston University (BU) College of Communication (COM) will host Pulitzer Prize-winning journalist, noted author and Director of the Narrative Nonfiction Program at BU, Isabel Wilkerson, to discuss her latest book The Warmth of Other Suns: The Epic Story of America’s Great Migration.

The discussion will be moderated by John Stauffer, Chair of the History of American Civilization program, and a Professor of English and African and African American Studies at Harvard University.

The event will include a book reading, reception and book signing.

Details:
Voices of the Great Migration: Isabel Wilkerson discusses The Warmth of Other Suns

Moderated by John Stauffer, Chair of the History of American Civilization program, and Professor of English and African and African American Studies at Harvard University

Hosts:
Boston University College of Communication

Date:
Thursday, December 2, 2010

Time:
Program at 4:30 PM; Reception and book signing at 6:00 PM

Location:
Boston University Photonics Center, Room 206
8 Saint Mary’s Street, Boston, MA

Admission:
Free and open to the public

Wilkerson, former Chicago Bureau Chief of The New York Times, won the 1994 Pulitzer Prize for feature writing for her coverage of breaking news and human interest pieces in Chicago. She is the first black woman to win a Pulitzer Prize in journalism and the first black American to win the prize for individual reporting. She also won the George Polk Award for her coverage of the Midwest and was named Journalist of the Year by the National Association of Black Journalists also in 1994. The Warmth of Other Suns is a New York Times best seller and has received rave reviews by The New York Times, The Wall Street Journal, The New Yorker, The Boston Globe and many others.

Stauffer is a well-known book reviewer and accomplished educator of varying topics including the Civil War era, anti-slavery, social protest movements and visual culture. His written work has been published in The Washington Post, Time Magazine, The New York Post and The Harvard Review. Stauffer reviewed The Warmth of Other Suns for The Wall Street Journal.

Founded in 1839, Boston University is an internationally recognized private research university with more than 30,000 students participating in undergraduate, graduate, and professional programs. BU consists of 17 colleges and schools along with a number of multi-disciplinary centers and institutes which are central to the school’s research and teaching mission.


Boston University to Host Academy Award Winner Geena Davis

November 5th, 2010 in Arts, BU In the Community, Education, Entertainment, Humanities/Social Science, News Releases 0 comments

Contact: Lauren Davalla, 617-358-1688 | davalla@bu.edu

(Boston) – The Friends of the Libraries at Boston University will host Academy Award-winning actor Geena Davis for a reception and lecture on Tuesday, November 30 at 6:00 PM in Metcalf Hall. Davis will reflect on her career and discuss the work of the Geena Davis Institute on Gender in Media. The evening will be dedicated to the memory of Charles Edward “Ted” Murphy, Project Manager of the Martin Luther King, Jr. Archival Collaboration and respected film critic.

Event Details
Event:
The Friends Speaker Series featuring Academy Award Winner Geena Davis
Date: Tuesday, November 30, 2010
Time: 6:00 PM
Location: Metcalf Hall, George Sherman Union (775 Commonwealth Ave, Second Floor)
Admission: Free to Friends of the Libraries and BU Students; $25 per person for public
Contact: Call 617-353-3696 or visit http://www.bu.edu/archives

Academy Award winner Geena Davis is one of Hollywood’s most respected actors, appearing in several roles that became cultural landmarks. Earning the 2006 Golden Globe Award for Best Performance by an Actress in a Television Series – Drama, Davis broke ground in her portrayal of the first female President of the United States in ABC’s hit show “Commander in Chief.”

In 1989, Davis received the Academy Award for Best Supporting Actress for her role as the offbeat dog trainer Muriel Pritchett in Lawrence Kasdan’s “The Accidental Tourist.” She was again nominated for an Academy Award and Golden Globe for her performance as Thelma in Ridley Scott’s “Thelma and Louise,” in which she co-starred with Susan Sarandon.

Davis went on to receive a Golden Globe nomination for Best Actress for her portrayal of baseball phenomenon Dottie Hinson in “A League of Their Own.”

A long-time advocate for women, Davis is recognized for her tireless efforts on behalf of girls and women nearly as much as for her acting accomplishments. She is the founder of the non-profit The Geena Davis Institute on Gender in Media and its programming arm See Jane, which engages film and television creators to dramatically increase the percentages of female characters — and reduce gender stereotyping — in media made for children 11 and under.

Davis was appointed to the California Commission on the Status of Women and is a partner with UNIFEM in the effort to change the way media represents women and girls globally, to encourage media to present and investigate issues of grave importance to women and to use a “gender” lens when reporting.

Boston University to Honor Georgia Congressman John Lewis and Civil Rights Activist Diane Nash

November 1st, 2010 in Arts, BU In the Community, Humanities/Social Science, News Releases 0 comments

Contact: Lauren Davalla, 617-358-1688 | davalla@bu.edu

(Boston) – The Howard Gotlieb Archival Research Center at Boston University will host Congressman John Lewis (Fifth District, Georgia) for their annual Martin Luther King, Jr. Leadership Lecture. Congressman Lewis is best known for his contributions to the Civil Rights Movement during the 1960’s and his work as a politician and social activist. Lewis will be installed as a Martin Luther King, Jr. Fellow and will speak on his professional experiences and offer insight into his life as “one of the most courageous persons the Civil Rights Movement ever produced.” The event will also feature Civil Rights Activist Diane Nash, the 2010 Coretta Scott King Fellow. The event is free and open to the public.

Event Details
Title:
Martin Luther King, Jr. Leadership Lecture featuring Congressman John Lewis, 5th District, Georgia
Date: Wednesday, November 10, 2010
Time: Doors open at 6:30 PM; lecture beginning at 7:00 PM
Location: Metcalf Hall (2nd Floor of the George Sherman Union, 775 Commonwealth Avenue, Boston)
Admission: Free and open to the public
Contact: For more information, call 617-353-3696 or email archives@bu.edu

In 1961, Congressman Lewis volunteered to participate in the Freedom Rides, which challenged segregation at interstate bus terminals across the South. Lewis risked his life on those Rides many times by simply sitting in seats reserved for white patrons. He was also beaten severely by angry mobs and arrested by police for challenging the injustice of Jim Crow segregation in the South. During the height of the Movement, from 1963 to 1966, Lewis was named Chairman of the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee (SNCC), which he helped form. A devoted advocate of the philosophy of nonviolence, John Lewis became a nationally recognized leader. By 1963, he was dubbed one of the Big Six leaders of the Civil Rights Movement. He was also an architect of and a keynote speaker at the historic March on Washington in August 1963. Lewis was elected to Congress in November 1986 and has served as U.S. Representative of Georgia’s Fifth Congressional District since then.

Diane Nash was a key force in the 1960s Civil Rights Movement. She was a leader and Chairman of the 1960s Nashville Student Movement, founder of the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee (SNCC) and a major participant in the Southern Christian Leadership Conferences’ Birmingham campaign and Selma Voting Rights Movement.

The mission of the Martin Luther King, Jr. Leadership Lecture is to bring speakers to the Boston University community who serve as leaders in the quest for maintaining social justice and human rights. We seek mentors for our students who exemplify the highest standards of Dr. King’s legacy.

Irish Tenor Ronan Tynan to Perform and Speak at Boston University

October 25th, 2010 in Arts, BU In the Community, Entertainment, Humanities/Social Science, News Releases 0 comments

Contact: Lauren Davalla, 617-358-1688 | davalla@bu.edu

(Boston) – The Howard Gotlieb Archival Research Center at Boston University will host an evening with Tenor Ronan Tynan. Tynan is an accomplished athlete, winning multiple medals while competing at the Paralympics, a physician specializing in orthopedic sports injuries and most well-known for his accomplishments as an opera singer. The event will include a lecture, Q+A and a performance. The event is free and open to the public.

Event Details
Event:
The Gotlieb Lecture Featuring Ronan Tynan
Hosts: The Howard Gotlieb Archival Research Center
Date: Wednesday, November 17, 2010
Time: Doors open at 6:30 PM; event begins at 7:00 PM
Location: Tsai Performance Center, 685 Commonwealth Avenue, Boston
Admission: Free and open to the public; please call to reserve ticket prior to event.
Contact: For tickets, call 617-353-8725 or email tsaictr@bu.edu
For more information, call 617-353-3696 or email archives@bu.edu

Tynan was introduced to international audiences in 1998 as a member of the Irish Tenors. In May 2004, he left the group to embark on a solo career. Later that summer, Tynan sang at the state funeral of President Ronald Reagan, thrilling an international audience with Amazing Grace and Schubert’s Ave Maria. Tynan released his self-titled debut album in the spring of 2005, which began a new era in his career.

Tynan won both the John McCormack Cup for Tenor Voice and the BBC talent show Go For It less than one year after beginning the study of voice. The following year, he won the International Operatic Singing Competition in Maumarde, France. He made his operatic debut as Pinkerton in Puccini’s Madame Butterfly, and broadened his concert repertoire in performances of Verdi’s Requiem, Mendelssohn’s Elijah, Handel’s Messiah, Rossini’s Stabat Mater, and Puccini’s Messa di Gloria. He has performed in venues from the White House to Yankee Stadium, where his popular performances of God Bless America became a standard seventh-inning stretch hallmark. Tynan has also lent his voice to the men and women of the New York Police and Fire Departments in the wake of 9/11, performing at benefits and memorial services.

There are several recently released CDs available. A documentary on Dr. Tynan: Doctor Courageous/Living Life to the Fullest was released in 2007.

The Howard Gotlieb Archival Research Center at Boston University seeks to capture and document history by collecting the manuscripts from individuals who play significant roles in the fields of journalism, poetry, literature and criticism, dance, music, theater, film, television, and political and religious movements. The Center strives to preserve the documents and make them readily available to researchers while administering all legal copyrights and restrictions. The Center also presents extensive exhibitions, seminars and tours for students, parents, alumni, various visiting groups and members of the public. For more information, visit www.bu.edu/archives.

The Centennial of the Metropolitan Opera’s First World Premiere

October 22nd, 2010 in Arts, College of Fine Arts, Entertainment, Humanities/Social Science, News Releases 0 comments

Contact: , |

(New York) – Puccini and Toscanini return to the Metropolitan Opera! Simonetta Puccini, Giacomo Puccini’s granddaughter, and Walfredo Toscanini, Arturo Toscanini’s grandson, are expected to be in attendance at a Met performance 100 years to the day after the premiere of La Fanciulla del West (The Girl of the Golden West), now starring Deborah Voigt and Marcello Giordani, conducted by Nicola Luisotti. Toscanini conducted the Metropolitan Opera’s first-ever world premiere in 1910, whose cast included Enrico Caruso, Emmy Destinn, and Pasquale Amato. Deemed the most spectacular event in the history of the Metropolitan Opera, the star-studded performance had no less than thirty-three curtain calls, and made the front page of the New York Times.

The celebration of the 100th anniversary features an e-conference at www.fanciulla100.org loaded with historical information in the form of video interviews with stellar performers, archival images and film, and scholarly essays. The site will be launched at a press event at the Italian Cultural Institute on December 3rd, which will also feature special guests. A symposium will be held at Boston University in collaboration with the Howard Gotlieb Archival Research Center on December 6, and papers will be delivered to assembled scholars and guests. The symposium will feature an exhibition of original archival material around the theme of Puccini and Fanciulla, showcasing material from collections held at the Center including the papers of Sarah Caldwell, Tito Gobbi, Dorothy Kirsten, Rise Stevens, Deborah Voigt and others.

Puccini’s Fanciulla takes place during the California Gold Rush and was based on the hit Broadway play by American dramatist David Belasco, The Girl of the Golden West. After the successes of La Bohème, Tosca, and Madama Butterfly, Puccini found in Belasco’s Girl of the Golden West just the “modern” melodrama he was looking for. And the “modern” format of the free educational e-conference will provide a treasure trove of vintage and contemporary materials. For more information, visit www.fanciulla100.org. For more information on the Howard Gotlieb Archival Research Center, please visit www.bu.edu/archives.

Contact: Deborah Burton
(978) 448-0643
burtond@bu.edu

Boston University Study Examines Effects of Deployment on Military Families

October 22nd, 2010 in BU In the Community, Education, Government, Health & Medicine, Humanities/Social Science, News Releases, School of Social Work 0 comments

Contact: Jason London, 617-358-5149 | london14@bu.edu

Boston, MA – On October 7, 2001 the United States entered a war in Afghanistan. Nine years later, the U.S. military is deployed in two oversea wars. Mental health professionals are turning their attention to service members, who are deploying more frequently and for longer periods of time. However, most research has focused on the mental health needs of soldiers deployed at war, and not the needs of their families. For this reason, a Boston University School of Social Work research team, headed by Associate Professor Ellen R. DeVoe and Assistant Professor Ruth Paris, set out to examine the effects of deployment on military families. They focused specifically on families with children under the age of five, as young children can be especially vulnerable to the effects of parental deployment. The article, “When a Parent Goes to War: Effects of Parental Deployment on Very Young Children and Implications for Intervention,” appears in the October edition of the American Journal of Orthopsychiatry.

According to the article, “The emerging but robust body of research documenting the mental health needs of returning service members, the impact of those conditions on the family, and the unique developmental vulnerabilities of young children in this context, build a strong case for making appropriate services available to families with young children. In addition to facilitating family reintegration by strengthening the parent-child relationship, support during the post-deployment period may serve to mitigate the legacy of combat stress in service-member parents and provide a powerful foundation for regaining a healthy developmental trajectory for young children.”

Previous studies have shown that children who are not able to develop secure relationships with their parents at a young age may experience long-term consequences. Babies and toddlers especially are not able to process sudden separations and reappearances of deployed parents. Furthermore, young children are disproportionately represented in military families with a young parent. In 2008, the Department of Defense reported that almost half a million children in the United States under the age of five have at least one parent on active duty.

The goal of the article was first to review existing literature on how parental combat stress and deployment impacts young children, parents, and parent-child relationships. Past research indicates that multiple deployments can severely limit service members’ involvement with their children and create significant stress for service members and their families. Service members returning home with injuries, disabilities and war-related mental-health symptoms (such as post-traumatic stress, irritability, anxiety and hypersensitivity) face additional challenges. Recent data on veterans of the Afghanistan and Iraqi Wars estimate that 40% of those seeking service post-deployment due so because of mental health concerns.

Secondly, the article aimed to examine existing programs for infants, toddlers and preschoolers to determine intervention principles that might easily translate to a program for military families during the reintegration period. After looking at a number of different models, the authors suggest home-based interventions are the most promising form of treatment for service members and their families.

Based on their findings, DeVoe and Paris proposed a program called “Strong Families Strong Forces (SFSF)” to help service members reintegrate into home life.” In 2008, the Department of Defense issued principal investigators DeVoe and Paris a four-year grant to create a program for service families with children under the age of five. In cooperation with the Massachusetts and Rhode Island National Guard and Reserves, the program specifically addresses families with a parent at the reintegration phase of the deployment cycle.

The SFSF program concentrates on addressing parenting stress and parent’s mental health, and easing the returning service member’s reintegration into the family. DeVoe and Paris’ team members refer to themselves as “family specialists” who visit each family for eight sessions within a year of the service member coming home. The program has been well-received among military families so far and is already showing signs of success. According to the researchers, parents in the program seem highly satisfied and say that communication and parent-child relationships in their family have improved.

The research team began conducting individual interviews with service members and their spouses in November of 2008 to assess the need for such a family-based program. A year later they introduced a pilot version of Strong Families Strong Forces to a small group of military parents and children. Currently, the team has entered the randomized control trial period, and hopes to enroll roughly 130 families over the next year.

“The goal of our program is to help military parents in re-connecting with their young children when they return from war.” said DeVoe. “Critical components of the work focus on enhancing parental understanding of the impact of deployment separation on the child and addressing the effects of war-related experiences on the service member’s parenting.”

DeVoe and Paris’ program is generating a great deal of national interest. They have attended a number of conferences, and last July they were invited by the Department of Defense to attend a meeting with five other principal investigators participating in Congressionally Directed Medical Research Programs.

Founded in 1839, Boston University is an internationally recognized private research university with more than 30,000 students participating in undergraduate, graduate, and professional programs. BU consists of 17 colleges and schools along with a number of multi-disciplinary centers and institutes which are central to the school’s research and teaching mission.


Boston University Supports Davis Phinney Foundation’s Exercise-Focused Tools to Support Parkinson’s Patients

October 19th, 2010 in Athletics, Health & Medicine, Humanities/Social Science, News Releases, Sargent College, Science & Technology 0 comments

Contact: Lauren Davalla, 617-358-1688 | davalla@bu.edu

(Boulder, CO) – The Davis Phinney Foundation (http://www.davisphinneyfoundation.org), a non-profit foundation whose mission is to provide information and tools that help people to live well with Parkinson’s disease, today announced the availability of a new exercise DVD: “Exercise and Parkinson’s: Questions and Answers from the Experts.” This DVD features a panel of movement disorder experts in the fields of physical therapy and exercise physiology who answer common questions about exercise and Parkinson’s disease, discuss the research related to exercise and offer tips and tools designed to reinforce the importance of exercise as a core strategy for living well at all ages and stages of Parkinson’s.

The new DVD is the latest effort by the Davis Phinney Foundation to identify and respond to unmet needs for information and tools within the Parkinson’s community. Surveys conducted by the Foundation continue to demonstrate the communications gap between people with Parkinson’s disease and their treatment providers concerning exercise. Among some of the findings: while 81 percent of people with Parkinson’s surveyed said they believed that exercise can slow disease progression, less than half (40 percent) reported discussing their exercise with their physician within six months of diagnosis, and almost one in five (19 percent) said they never discussed exercise with their physician. In those cases where exercise has been part of the discussion, patients leave with many unanswered questions regarding the types and frequency of exercise that will be most helpful for them.

“Exercise and Parkinson’s: Questions and Answers from the Experts” features leading movement disorder experts in the field of physical therapy and exercise – Terry Ellis, PT, Ph.D., NCS, Boston University; Mark A. Hirsch, Ph.D., Carolinas Rehabilitation/Carolinas Medical Center; Matthew Ford, PT, M.A., Ph.D., The University of Alabama at Birmingham; and Lee Dibble, PT, Ph.D., ATC, University of Utah – and people living with Parkinson’s disease who demonstrate the importance of exercise and share insight on incorporating exercise into a Parkinson’s disease treatment plan. The DVD is provided at no charge for people enrolled in the Foundation’s Every Victory Counts™ self-care management program (www.everyvictorycounts.org), which connects people with Parkinson’s disease to a wealth of valuable educational materials, including an interactive manual that empowers people to live well with Parkinson’s disease today and take a more active role in managing their care.

“Exercise should be part of the standard of care for Parkinson’s disease as the growing body of scientific evidence strongly demonstrates the effectiveness of exercise as an essential tool for maintaining balance, mobility and daily quality of life, not to mention the possibility that exercise might actually protect nerve cells and slow disease progression in the brain,” said Dr. Ellis.

Rob Biddle, 54, who is featured in the DVD training with Dr. Hirsch, follows an exercise plan that consists of spin classes, resistance training, treadmill walking and balance training at his local YMCA. “I am committed to this exercise routine to address my Parkinson’s symptoms and now feel better than when I was 30 years old,” Biddle said. “I am convinced that if I continue exercising, it will help me maintain my strength and balance longer. I would encourage anyone with Parkinson’s disease to begin an exercise program.”

In addition to the “Exercise and Parkinson’s: Questions and Answers from the Experts” DVD, the Davis Phinney Foundation has also developed “Top 10 Tips” guide for exercising with Parkinson’s and the research that supports them. Among the tips (a full list is available at www.davisphinneyfoundation.org/tips):

• Exercise is medicine. Exercise has been proven to build a healthier heart, lungs, and muscles, boost metabolism, prevent diabetes, and reduces disability. New research suggests that exercise may even provide neuroprotection – slowing the progression of Parkinson’s in the brain by safeguarding vulnerable nerve cells from damage and degeneration.

• Have fun. If you don’t enjoy it, you won’t stick with it. Do something you like. Dance, yoga, tai chi, cycling and strength exercises have all been shown to help with physical and cognitive symptoms of Parkinson’s. Also try exercising with a group. Research shows that people stick with exercise when there is encouragement and an expectation for you to show up.

“The Davis Phinney Foundation is pleased to provide these resources as a direct response to needs identified in the Parkinson’s community”, said Amy Howard, Executive Director of the Davis Phinney Foundation. “Research is now supporting the experience of people living with Parkinson’s – if you exercise you will feel better and you will positively affect many of the symptoms of Parkinson’s – including movement, depression and sleep. It’s critical that people educate themselves and make exercise a core component of their care.”

For additional Every Victory Counts program and registration information, visit http://www.everyvictorycounts.org or call 1-877-279-5277. All program proceeds support Davis Phinney Foundation-funded Parkinson’s research and educational programs.

Davis Phinney FoundationThe Davis Phinney Foundation was created in 2004 by cycling legend Davis Phinney and is dedicated to helping people with Parkinson’s disease live well today. The foundation’s major initiatives include: The Every Victory Counts™ Program, developed by movement disorder experts to encourage living well with Parkinson’s; Victory Summit series of symposia, which bring leading experts into local communities to share the latest advances in science, care and inspire those affected by the disease to celebrate the daily victories in their lives; and the funding of research focused on exercise, speech and other quality of life therapies. Learn more by visiting the web site: http://www.davisphinneyfoundation.org.

BU School of Education to Host Private Screening of Waiting for Superman

September 29th, 2010 in BU In the Community, Education, Entertainment, Humanities/Social Science, School of Education 0 comments

Contact: Lauren Davalla, 617-358-1688 | davalla@bu.edu

(Boston) – Boston University School of Education (SED) is hosting a screening of Waiting for Superman, an acclaimed documentary from Academy Award-winning director Davis Guggenheim. The filmmaker takes an in-depth look at the current state of public education in the United States, spotlighting the lives of five public school students and several educators in their pursuit of academic growth. The screening is open to SED students, faculty, staff and alumni.

Event Details
Event:
Waiting for Superman Private Screening
Date: Thursday, October 7, 2010
Time: Doors open at 7:00 PM, screening at 7:30 PM
Location: Coolidge Corner Theatre
290 Harvard Street
Brookline, MA 02446
Admission: Private
Contact: Office of Student Services, 617-353-4233, sedstu@bu.edu

SED Director of Student Services, Jacqueline Boyle said, “SED students felt strongly about screening this film as a community. It appears that Guggenheim’s exhaustive review of what the American education system has become is of interest to our students and we needed give them an opportunity to see it for themselves.”

“I’m glad SED got behind this event,” said SED Graduate Student and screening organizer Andrew Barlow. “The film addresses important issues that we face as future educators and also addresses hot topics in this year’s elections.”

Established in 1918, Boston University’s School of Education serves a diverse student body of 400 undergraduate and 600 graduate students, 112 of whom are pursuing doctoral degrees. It has 52 full-time faculty, numerous adjunct faculty, and 40 staff members. In addition to a significant focus on preparing education professionals, the school is regarded highly for programs in the fields of literacy, mathematics education, deaf studies, international educational development, special education and science education. It is further distinguished by its productive partnerships with local school districts, most notably with Chelsea and Boston.

Founded in 1839, Boston University is an internationally recognized private research university with more than 30,000 students participating in undergraduate, graduate, and professional programs. BU consists of 17 colleges and schools along with a number of multi-disciplinary centers and institutes which are central to the school’s research and teaching mission.