Category: HealthDay News

The Parenting Trap: Coddling Anxious Kids

September 12th, 2014 in 2014, Centers & Institutes in the News, College and Graduate School of Arts and Sciences, Donna Pincus, HealthDay News, Newsmakers 0 comments

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Donna Pincus, College of Arts & Sciences, Center for Anxiety & Related Disorders

Some parents may make things worse for their anxious kids by falling into what researchers call the “protection trap” — reassuring them, lavishing them with attention or making the threat go away, according to the results of a small study…

Expert quote:

“Left untreated, anxiety disorders in youth are associated with greater risk for other psychological problems such as depression and substance use problems.”

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Low Birth Weights May Put Black Women at Risk for Diabetes

August 21st, 2014 in 2014, Centers & Institutes in the News, Edward A. Ruiz-Narváez, HealthDay News, Newsmakers, School of Public Health 0 comments

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Edward A. Ruiz-Narváez, School of Public Health, Slone Epidemiology Center

Being born at a low birth weight puts black women at increased risk for type 2 diabetes, a new study suggests…

Expert quote:

“African-American women are at increased risk of developing type 2 diabetes, and also have higher rates of low birth weight than white women. Our study shows a clear relationship between birth weight and diabetes that highlights the importance of further research for this at-risk group.”

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Blood Transfusions May Cut Risk of ‘Silent’ Stroke in Kids With Sickle Cell

August 20th, 2014 in 2014, HealthDay News, Martin Steinberg, Newsmakers, School of Medicine 0 comments

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Martin Steinberg, School of Medicine

Monthly blood transfusions may lower the chances of “silent” strokes in some children with sickle cell anemia, a new clinical trial indicates…

Expert quote:

“The results of this trial are solid. But it could be very difficult to do this in a community hospital setting, where the resources might not be there.”

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HPV Vaccine Protects Against Infection 8 Years Out: Study

August 18th, 2014 in 2014, HealthDay News, Newsmakers, Rebecca Perkins, RESEARCH @ BU, School of Public Health 0 comments

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Rebecca Perkins, School of Medicine

A new long-term study shows that the human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine appears to protect against the sexually transmitted virus for at least eight years…

Expert quote:

“Almost everybody [parents and doctors] we talked to thought getting the vaccine was a good idea. They thought that preventing cancer is good and that all girls should get vaccinated. What was happening was a problem with timing.”

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Exercise Helps Protect Black Women From Breast Cancer, Study Says

August 15th, 2014 in 2014, HealthDay News, Lynn Rosenberg, Newsmakers, RESEARCH @ BU, School of Public Health 0 comments

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Lynn Rosenberg, School of Public Health, Slone Epidemiology Center

Brisk walking and other forms of exercise reduce a black woman’s risk of breast cancer, U.S. researchers report…

Expert quote:

“Although expert review panels have accepted a link between physical exercise and breast cancer incidence, most study participants have been white women. This is the first large-scale study to support that vigorous exercise may decrease incidence of breast cancer in African-American women.”

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Combo Approach May Work Best for Smokers Looking to Quit

July 8th, 2014 in 2014, HealthDay News, Michael Siegel, Newsmakers, School of Public Health 0 comments

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Michael Siegel, School of Public Health

Combining two anti-smoking approaches — the medication Chantix and nicotine patches — improves the odds you’ll quit smoking over the short term, a new industry-funded study suggests…

Expert quote:

“It provides some of the first information about the potential effectiveness of combining Chantix and nicotine replacement therapy.”

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Natural Conception Later in Life Tied to Longer Life for Women

June 25th, 2014 in 2014, HealthDay News, Newsmakers, RESEARCH @ BU, School of Medicine, Thomas Perls 0 comments

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Thomas Perls, School of Medicine

Women who naturally have babies after age 33 tend to live longer than those who had their last child before age 30, a new study finds. This may be because gene variations that enable women to have babies at a later age may also be tied to living longer lives, the Boston University School of Medicine researchers said…

Expert quote:

“If a woman has those variants, she is able to reproduce and bear children for a longer period of time, increasing her chances of passing down those genes to the next generation.”

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More Progress Made on Artificial Pancreas for Diabetes Patients

June 15th, 2014 in 2014, College of Engineering, Edward Damiano, HealthDay News, Newsmakers, RESEARCH @ BU 0 comments

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Edward Damiano, College of Engineering

Progress continues to be made on the development of an artificial pancreas, a device that would ease the burden of living with type 1 diabetes…

Expert quote:

“It’s a totally pocket-sized device.”

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Can 6,000 Steps a Day Keep Knee Arthritis at Bay?

June 12th, 2014 in 2014, Daniel White, HealthDay News, Newsmakers, RESEARCH @ BU, Sargent College 0 comments

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Daniel White, College of Health & Rehabilitation Sciences: Sargent College

Walking the equivalent of an hour a day may help improve knee arthritis and prevent disability, new research suggests. Because of knee arthritis, many older adults find walking, climbing stairs or even getting up from a chair difficult. But these study findings equate walking more with better everyday functioning…

Expert quote:

“People with or at risk for knee arthritis should be walking around 6,000 steps per day, and the more walking one does the less risk of developing functioning difficulties.”

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Can E-Cigarettes Help You Quit Smoking?

May 21st, 2014 in 2014, HealthDay News, Michael Siegel, Newsmakers, School of Public Health 0 comments

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Michael Siegel, School of Public Health

A new study by British researchers suggests that e-cigarettes can help people stop smoking. The study found that people who wanted to quit smoking were about 60 percent more likely to succeed if they used e-cigarettes compared to would-be quitters who tried an anti-smoking nicotine patch or gum…

Expert quote:

“It appears, at least for some people, e-cigarettes are a viable method of quitting that looks comparable to, if not better than, traditional nicotine replacement therapy.”

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