Category: Futurity News

Does peer review pick the best science?

April 24th, 2015 in 2015, Futurity News, Leila Agha, Newsmakers, Questrom School of Business, RESEARCH @ BU 0 comments

AghaLeilaFuturity News
Leila Agha, Questrom School of Business

The concept of peer review is central to National Institutes of Health (NIH) funding and to science itself—journals choose articles for publication based on fellow scientists’ scrutiny…

View full article

Maps pinpoint where cars pollute the most

April 15th, 2015 in 2015, College and Graduate School of Arts and Sciences, Futurity News, Ian Sue Wing, Lucy Hutyra, Newsmakers, RESEARCH @ BU 0 comments

Futurity News
Lucy Hutyra, College of Arts & Sciences
Ian Sue Wing, College of Arts & Sciences

A new way to calculate the carbon dioxide emissions from cars could help cities find—and fix— their pollution “hotspots.”…

View full article

Wide hips aren’t worse for getting around

April 14th, 2015 in 2015, Futurity News, Kristi Lewton, Newsmakers, RESEARCH @ BU, School of Medicine 0 comments

lewtonFuturity News
Kristi Lewton, School of Medicine

Two physical features, among others, make humans unique: our way of walking and running upright on two legs, and our newborn babies’ very large heads…

View full article

Siblings reveal secret to living past 105

April 9th, 2015 in 2015, Futurity News, Newsmakers, RESEARCH @ BU, School of Public Health 0 comments

Futurity News
School of Public Health

The difference between living to 90 and living past 105 seems to depend largely on genes, according to a study of siblings…

View full article

Can iPad therapy mend speech after stroke?

March 25th, 2015 in 2015, Futurity News, Newsmakers, RESEARCH @ BU, Sargent College, Swathi Kiran 0 comments

swathiFuturity News
Swathi Kiran, College of Health & Rehabilitation Sciences: Sargent College

New research suggests that personalized therapy via an iPad app can benefit people with aphasia, a brain disorder that seriously inhibits language…

View full article

Does ‘subfertility’ account for some in vitro risk?

March 20th, 2015 in 2015, Eugene Declercq, Futurity News, Newsmakers, RESEARCH @ BU, School of Public Health 0 comments

declercqFuturity News
Eugene Declercq, School of Public Health

The growth of assisted reproductive technology (ART) has raised concerns about a range of issues, including an excess of preterm births, low birth weight, and newborn deaths…

View full article

Bullies who were bullied at risk for suicide

March 19th, 2015 in 2015, Futurity News, Melissa Holt, Newsmakers, RESEARCH @ BU, School of Education 0 comments

SEDFACULTYFuturity News
Melissa Holt, School of Education

Being bullied can put youth at risk for suicidal thoughts and behaviors, but so can being a bully. And those who have been both bullies and bullied are at the highest risk of all, a new analysis shows…

View full article quoting expert Melissa Holt

Big drinks like Four Loko cause trouble for teens

March 11th, 2015 in 2015, Alison Albers, Futurity News, Newsmakers, RESEARCH @ BU, School of Public Health 0 comments

Futurity News
Alison Albers, School of Public Health

New research links supersized alcoholic beverages, such as Four Loko or Joose, to a higher rate of alcohol-related injuries among some underage drinkers.

Expert quote:

“These findings raise important concerns about the popularity and use of flavored alcoholic beverages among young people, particularly for the supersized varieties.”

View full article

 

No major health risks from trans hormone therapy

March 4th, 2015 in 2015, Futurity News, Joshua Safer, Newsmakers, RESEARCH @ BU, School of Medicine 0 comments

joshuasaferFuturity News
Joshua Safer, School of Medicine

Hormone therapy is safe for transgender adults, according to the most comprehensive review on the subject to date.

Expert quote:

“Although many of the studies identified were small and will need to be replicated with larger numbers of patients involved, the overall trend of the findings is reassuring.”

View full article

 

Familiar ‘smoke and mirrors’ promote e-cigs

February 25th, 2015 in 2015, Futurity News, Newsmakers, RESEARCH @ BU, School of Management 0 comments

Stine GrodalFuturity News
Stine Grodal, School of Management

A new study investigates how the tobacco industry managed to raise the levels of tar and nicotine in “light” cigarettes for decades without a regulatory crackdown—despite mounting proof of health hazards…

Expert quote:

“For example, as labels such as ‘low fat’ and ‘low sugar’ became increasingly taken-for-granted shortcuts for the notion of ‘healthy’ food, there is some evidence that companies increasingly manipulated underlying product characteristics to make them more palatable, such as adding more sugar or fat and adjusting the serving size to mask the increase.”

View full article