Boston University Geography Professor Receives Rank of Fellow With AAAS

in College and Graduate School of Arts and Sciences, News Releases, Science & Technology
October 31st, 2003

Contact: Ann Marie Menting, 617/353-2240 | amenting@bu.edu

(Boston, Mass.) — Alan Strahler, a professor in Boston University’s Department of Geography and member of the University’s Center for Remote Sensing, has been selected for the distinction of Fellow by the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS). Strahler is among 348 AAAS members who have been named as 2003 Fellows. They will be honored on Saturday, February 14, 2004, during the Fellows Forum at the AAAS annual meeting in Seattle, Washington.

Strahler, a biogeographer, receives the distinction in recognition of his “pioneering work in remote sensing of land cover and land-cover dynamics, including modeling and testing directional reflectance of plant canopies.” Strahler and the other 2003 Fellows are listed in the News & Notes section of the October 31 issue of Science, the AAAS journal.

The distinction of Fellow is conferred to AAAS members whose efforts toward advancing science applications are deemed scientifically or socially distinguished. Members are considered for the rank if nominated in one of three ways: by the steering group of their respective sections, by three Fellows, or by the association’s Chief Executive Officer. Names of approved candidates are forwarded to the association’s policymaking body, the AAAS Council, for a final vote.

Founded in 1848, the AAAS is the world’s largest general federation of scientists. The organization works to advance science for human well-being through projects, programs, and publications in the areas of science policy, science education, and international scientific cooperation.

The Department of Geography at Boston University emphasizes traditional geographic theory, quantitative techniques, and environmental and policy studies. The Center for Remote Sensing uses satellite images and other data from airborne and ground sensors to study Earth and its resources. Boston University, with an enrollment of more than 29,000 in its 17 schools and colleges, is the fourth-largest independent university in the United States.

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