Olivier “Ollie” Barthelemy

Title
Second year doctoral student, Clinical Psychology
Education
B.A., 2012, Rice University

Research Interests

I am interested in exploring the visual impairments related to Parkinson’s disease. Currently, I am helping Mirella examine how visual hallucinations and freezing of gait are associated to visual impairments and cognition.

Current Projects

I’ve been involved in two directed studies including a longitudinal study of inner-city children (some of whom have prenatal exposure to cocaine, tobacco, alcohol, or marijuana) and examining how the largest determinants of behavioral problems is actually their postnatal social environment, including exposure to violence, and another examining the effects of alcohol use disorders on neuropsychological functioning and brain tissue, including different effects based on sex.

Relevant Experience

As an undergraduate at Rice University, I was involved in olfaction research with Dr. Denise Chen, specifically looking at binaral rivalry. I also helped in the Andreas Tolias visual neuroscience lab at Baylor College of Medicine. There, I trained a rhesus macaque monkey on an eye-tracking task involving the flash-lag effect and helped modify the stimulus when the monkey had trouble understanding the task. Finally, at Rice I also worked with Dr. James Pomerantz’s visual perception laboratory, where I helped explore how emergent features are involved with perceptual gestalts.

Hobbies

I love playing music. In addition to playing the saxophone, I was the Drum Major for Rice University’s Marching Owl Band. I currently enjoy running, cooking, and reading.

Posters and Presentations

Barthelemy, O., Cragin, A., Pomerantz, J. (2012). “Four-Dot Configurations, Emergent Features, and Memory.” Poster presented at the annual Rice Undergraduate Research Symposium.

Subramaniyan, M., Ecker, A.S., Berens, P., Barthelemy, O., Hoenselaar, A., Bethge, M., Tolias, A.S. (2011) “Towards the Neural Basis of the Flash-Lag Effect.” Poster presented at the Society for Neuroscience Annual Meeting.