In The News

After 15 years, Deadly Disease Research Lab nears Approval in Boston

May 31st, 2017 in Featured, In The News.

Original article from Boston 25 News. May 30, 2017 BOSTON - A lab to study deadly diseases like Ebola and bubonic plague is just one vote away from approval in the heart of Boston. Supporters say it will speed the development of new vaccines and cures.  But after 15 year of... More

Advances in Ebola Diagnosis and Treatment

May 23rd, 2017 in Featured, In The News.

Original article from WCAI by Heather Goldstone  May 22, 2017 Ebola is back. The virus killed more than 11,000 people between 2014 and 2016. It was the largest Ebola outbreak ever documented. Now, health officials say there’s a new outbreak in the Democratic Republic of Congo. Officials are reporting four deaths and... More

You Can’t Bomb Ebola’: How Nations Should Respond To the Next Pandemic

May 5th, 2017 in Featured, In The News.

Original article in Time Health Magazine - Alexandra Sifferlin  May 03, 2017 The Ebola outbreak of 2014 infected more than 28,000 people in West Africa and killed more than 11,000. It also exposed gaps in the world's ability to respond to epidemics of infectious diseases. Are we more prepared now to respond... More

New Report Charts Ways to Expedite Research During Epidemics

April 13th, 2017 in Featured, In The News.

Original article from: Scientific American posted on April 12, 2017. by Helen Branswell When the largest Ebola outbreak in history exploded across West Africa in 2014, public health authorities raced to test experimental vaccines and drugs they hoped would quell the massive epidemic. But the trials process was too slow, and in... More

NEIDL Researchers Present Case for Next-Level Research

March 7th, 2017 in Events, Featured, In The News.

Original article from: BU Today posted on March 7, 2017. by Art Jahnke Infectious disease experts and administrators from Boston University told the Boston Biosafety Committee (BBC) on Monday night that the ability to conduct research at Biosafety Level 4 (BSL-4) at BU’s National Emerging Infectious Diseases Laboratory (NEIDL) would speed... More

Boston Public Health Commission to Consider NEIDL Research Request Tonight

March 6th, 2017 in Events, Featured, In The News, Lab Updates.

Original article from: BU Today posted on March 6, 2017. by Sara Rimer The Boston Public Health Commission will hold a public meeting this evening, Monday, March 6, to discuss a request by Boston University’s National Emerging Infectious Diseases Laboratories (NEIDL) for permission to conduct research at Biosafety Level 4 (BSL-4). More

Blood Test May Predict Who Lives or Dies with Ebola

January 23rd, 2017 in Featured, In The News.

Original article from: BU Today posted on January 23, 2017. by Barbara Moran In 2014, Ebola exploded across western Africa. It was the worst outbreak of the virus in recorded history, killing more than 11,000 people before it sputtered out in early 2016. In the Republic of Guinea, the epicenter of... More

Bring on the Ebola Research

December 30th, 2016 in Featured, In The News, Lab Updates.

Original article from: Boston Globe posted on December 29, 2016. by Dante Ramos For humanity to conquer Ebola and other deadly diseases, we need the right combination of scientists to study them from every possible angle. Where’s that more likely to happen — in a state-of-the-art biolab amid the world’s deepest... More

BU Biolab Gets Approval for Research on Deadliest Pathogens

December 27th, 2016 in Featured, In The News, Lab Updates.

Original article from: Boston Globe posted on December 24, 2016. by Evan Allen & Felicia Gans The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention has approved a Biosafety Level 4 laboratory to operate on Boston University’s medical campus in the South End, according to the Boston Public Health Commission. Scientists in the National... More

The 9 Deadliest Viruses on Earth

November 4th, 2016 in Featured, In The News.

Original article from: Live Science posted on October 27, 2016. by Anne Harding Humans have been battling viruses since before our species had even evolved into its modern form. For some viral diseases, vaccines and antiviral drugs have allowed us to keep infections from spreading widely, and have helped sick people... More