Nanomaterials and Nanostructure Optics (NaNO)

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ENG SC 777: Nano-Optics

 

sdgsCourse description: Nano-optics lies at the heart of the current Nanotechnology revolution as an interdisciplinary and fascinating research field that studies the unique convergence of optical and electronic properties of advanced materials at the nanoscale. This course will provide a comprehensive overview of the physical concepts that are necessary to understand the operation of a variety of advanced optical devices that rely on the behavior of optical fields and materials systems confined in nanoscale environments. In particular, fundamental aspects of light-matter interactions at the nano scale and the physics of advanced quantum and photonic structures will be discussed in relation to novel device applications. The study of the physical principles, design and device applications of optical materials and structures is of interest to a multidisciplinary audience, ranging from physics, electronics and photonics engineers to researchers in industry and academia. 4crs.

Syllabus:

  • Fundamentals of electrodynamics, diffraction theory and optical response theory
  • Strongly confined fields and near-field optics: optics below the diffraction limit, near-field optical microscopy.
  • Light-matter interactions in confined systems: quantum emitters, energy coupling phenomena, plasmonic structures, photonic crystals and resonators
  • Applications to optical devices: plasmon sensing, nano-lasers, random lasers, plasmon waveguides, micro-ring and ultra high Q resonators, photonic crystal structures, optical antennas.

Instructor: Prof. Luca Dal Negro (dalnegro@bu.edu)

Prerequisites: Electromagnetics, introductory quantum mechanics, semiconductor physics.

Samples from students evaluations, Spring 2008:

 

ENG SC 770: Guided-wave optoelectronics

Course description: Optoelectronics lies at the heart of the current information revolution as an interdisciplinary and fascinating research field that studies the unique convergence of optical and electronic properties of semiconductor and metal-dielectric materials.
svbThis course will provide a comprehensive overview of the physical concepts that are necessary to understand the operation, and design the characteristics, of a variety of advanced optoelectronic devices.
In particular, we will discuss the physics and engineering aspects of semiconductor waveguides, light sources, modulators and quantum semiconductor devices, such as quantum-based detectors, emitters and modulators.
The study of the physical principles, design and device applications of optoelectronics materials and structures is of interest to a multidisciplinary audience, ranging from physics, electronics and photonics engineers to researchers in industry and academia. 4crs.

Syllabus:

  • Fundamentals of electrodynamics, review of dielectrics and metals optics and semiconductor physics
  • Dielectric optical waveguides, waveguide coupling theory, optical resonators, slot waveguides and introduction to photonic crystal structures
  • Light-matter interactions in semiconductors, semiconductor light sources, laser structures, detectors.
  • Semiconductor quantum structures, quantum wells, superlattices, quantum dot emitters and modulators
  • Optoelectronic integration: optical integrated circuits and optical switching
  • Introduction to plasmonics: optoelectronics application of metal and metal-dielectric nanostructures

Instructor: Prof. Luca Dal Negro (dalnegro@bu.edu)

Prerequisites: Electromagnetics, Introductory photonics, Semiconductor physics, Introductory Quantum Mechanics
Suggested readings: Physics of Optoelectronic Devices, by Shun Lien Chuang (John Wiley,1995), Fundamentals of Optical Waveguides, by Katsunari Okamoto, (Academic Press, 2006), Fundamentals of Photonics, II edition, by B.E.A. Saleh, M. C. Teich, (John Wiley & Sons Inc., NY 2007), Photonics, by A. Yariv, P. Yeh, (Oxford University Press, 2007)

Samples from students evaluations, Fall 2007:

 

ENG SC 560: Introduction to Photonics

Prereq: CAS PY 313. Introduction to ray optics, wave optics, Fourier optics and ho-lography, absorption, dispersion. Polarization, anisotropic media, and crystal optics. Guided-wave and fiber optics. Elements of photon optics. Laboratory experiments: interference; diffraction and spatial filtering; polarizers, retarders, and liquid-crystal displays; fiber-optic communication links. 4 cr.

Samples from students evaluations, Spring 2007:

 

ENG EK 131/2: Exploring the Science of Light

Prereq: simple programming using Matlab. No textbook is needed. Study material will be provided in class.

The intelligent use of light in science and technology is at the core of an impressive number of high-performance optical devices ranging from laser chips, optical sensors, to  all-optical communication systems for high-speed computing and data transfer.
The aim of this short course is to introduce the students to the basic elements of light-wave technology thorough a series of classroom lectures, hands-on computer simulations of optical problems and Lab experiments. In particular, we will discuss the application of geometric, wave and polarization optics to the fabrication of simple optical devices and systems which the students will design and build using simple optical components, readily available in optical laboratories, or even in everyday life. Practical demonstrations and Lab experiments in optical diffraction, Fourier optics, holography and light scattering will be designed in the class, using simple Matlab programs, and subsequently carried on in the optical Lab to the joy of exploring the science of light. 2 cr.

 

ENG EC 410: Electronics

Prereq: EK307 (Circuits)

Principles of diode, BJT, and MOSFET circuits. Graphical and analytical means of analysis. Piecewise linear modeling; amplifiers; digital inverters and logic gates. Biasing and small-signal analysis, microelectronic design techniques. Time-domain and frequency domain analysis and design. Includes lab. 4 cr, either sem.

 

Now Teaching...

 

Short Courses & Tutorials

Nanoplasmonics: Science and Technology of Metal Nanostructures

Course description: Nanoplasmonics lies at the heart of the current Nanotechnology revolution as an interdisciplinary and fascinating research field that studies the unique convergence of optical and electronic properties of advanced materials at the nanoscale. This course will provide a comprehensive overview of the physical concepts that are necessary to understand the operation of a variety of advanced optical devices that rely on the behavior of optical fields and materials systems confined in nanoscale environments. In particular, fundamental aspects of light-matter interactions at the nano scale and the physics of advanced quantum and photonic structures will be discussed in relation to novel device applications. The study of the physical principles, design and device applications of Nanophotonics materials structures is of interest to a multidisciplinary audience, ranging from physics, electronics and photonics engineers to researchers in industry and academia.

Syllabus:

  • Electromagnetics of metals, Review of Mie Theory
  • Surface Plasmon Polaritons (SPPs) at metal/insulator interfaces, Localized SPPs in nanostructures.
  • Excitation, propagation and imaging of SPP waves, plasmonic resonance in complex structures.
  • Surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS), enhancement of light-matter interactions in confined systems: near-field enhancement, fluorescence enhancement, metal nanoparticle fluorescence, enhancement of nonlinearities, SPPs localization and nanostructure coupling.
  • Applications to optical devices: plasmon waveguides, plasmon-based sensors, plasmon-coupled LEDs, applications to metamaterials, perfect lenses and plasmon-assisted nanolithography, emerging applications.