Courses

FALL 2014

UNDERGRADUATE COURSES

Music Appreciation (Pamela Feo)

MH 105 (2 credits)

Days Start End Bldg Room
TR 3:30 PM 5:00 PM CFA B36

 

History & Literature of Music 1 (Trent Leipert)

MH 201 (CFA–3 credits)

This course aims to develop students’ knowledge and familiarity with what is commonly referred to as “classical music”–music coming out of the many traditions that constitute Western art music. Through a careful and guided study of selected musical works, practices and historical contexts, students will develop skills for listening to, thinking about, and writing critically on music. This course proceeds roughly chronologically from Antiquity to the middle of the 18th century.

Days Start End Bldg Room
TR 11:00 AM 12:30 PM CFA 154

 

History & Literature of Music 1 (Jacqueline Sholes)

MH 211 (4 credits)

Days Start End Bldg Room
MWF 1:00 PM 2:00 PM CFA 414

 

Music in the Renaissance (Jeannette Di Bernardo Jones)

MH 322–A1 (CFA–3 credits)

MH 422–A1 (CAS–4 credits)

Days Start End Bldg Room
TR 9:30 AM 11:00 AM CFA 165

 

Music after 1900 (Thomas Peattie)

MH 326–A1 (CFA–3 credits)

MH 426–A1 (CAS–4 credits)

This course considers the main trends in music from the turn of the twentieth century to the present. The course will focus on specific works and their cultural contexts, including aspects of form, compositional process, social significance, and politics, as well as on aspects of performance, recording, and reception.

Days Start End Bldg Room
TR 11:00 AM 12:30 PM CFA 216

 

Musical Cultures of the World (Andrés Espinoza Agurto)

MH 336–A1 (CFA–3 credits)

MH 436–A1 (CAS–4 credits)

Days Start End Bldg Room
TR 11:00 AM 12:30 PM CFA B36

 

Music and Society (Andrew Shenton)

MH 344 (CAS–var. cr.)

Days Start End Bldg Room
TR 3:30 PM 5:00 PM CFA 216

 

Popular Music: World Beat (Miki Kaneda)

MH 353 (3 credits)

This course examines selected popular musical cultures from around the world. The course introduces music in relation to topics and issues that may include migration, politics, everyday life, and globalization. Through hands-on activities, students will be introduced to some of the themes and methods central to the field of ethnomusicology.

Days Start End Bldg Room
TR 02:00 PM 3:30 PM CFA B36

 

GRADUATE COURSES

Graduate Music History Review I (Kristen Edwards)

MH 401 (2 credits)

Days Start End Bldg Room
TBA

 

World Music Ensemble: SALSA (Andrés Espinoza Agurto)

MH 561 (var. cr.)

Days Start End Bldg Room
T 5:30 PM 8:30 PM CFA B36

 

Music Research Techniques (Ulrike Praeger)

MH 611 (2 credits)

Days Start End Bldg Room
MW
MW
9:00 AM
10:00 AM
10:00 AM
11:00 AM
Mugar
Mugar
205
205

 

Topics in Musical Style: Music after 1900 (Trent Leipert)

MH 620 (3 credits)

This course considers important and influential compositional practices, schools, and idioms emerging since 1900. Through a close study of selected works, student presentations and class discussions, we will examine various musical styles in the twentieth century while developing formal, contextual and critical perspectives.

Days Start End Bldg Room
MWF 2:00 PM 3:00 PM CFA 216

 

Individual Composers: Igor Stravinsky (Miki Kaneda)

MH 631 (3 credits)

This seminar examines Stravinsky’s music from a variety of approaches including score and recording analysis, and discussions of Stravinsky scholarship. The course also examines Stravinsky in our contemporary musical culture by considering his influence on forms that may include centennial celebrations, remixes, new interpretations, videogames, fashion, film, and criticism.

Days Start End Bldg Room
TR 11:00 AM 12:30 PM CFA 154

 

Research and Bibliography (Jacqueline Sholes)

MH 711 (3 credits)

Days Start End Bldg Room
MWF
TR
9:00 AM
9:30 AM
10:00 AM
11:00 AM
Mugar
Mugar
203
203

 

Writing DMA Rec (Richard Bunbury)

MH 715 (1 credit)

Days Start End Bldg Room
W
R
1:00 PM
11:00 AM
2:00 PM
12:00 PM
CFA
CFA
216
156

 

Special Topics in Musicology: “Jacobus Clemens non Papa: Beyond Contemporary Fame – Beyond the Funny Name” (Joshua Rifkin)

MH 727/827 (4 credits)

The Renaissance composer Jacobus Clemens non Papa probably owed his unwieldy name to a joke – the epithet “not the Pope” served to distinguish this Jacob Clement, as the name probably read in his native language, from the Medici Pope Clement VII. Even scholars specializing in his period often know nothing more about him. Yet in his lifetime, Clemens ranked among the best-known, most widely distributed, and apparently most influential composers. Not only that: those who take the trouble to get to know his music find themselves confronted with a seemingly inexhaustible imagination that again and again seizes vividly on his texts to create soundscapes of drama and depth.

But the man behind the music remains a cipher. Hardly any biographical information survives; what little we know, moreover, suggests an unstable and probably sketchy character – “a great drunkard,” as one contemporary called him, who seems to have lurched from job to job. With the uncertain biography go problems of transmission: while his music survives in a broad array of printed and manuscript sources, we face enormous difficulties in determining their authority.

The Boston University Center for Early Music Studies and the Alamire Foundation in Leuven, Belgium, have joined forces to create a series of events focusing great attention of Clemens and his music: a two-part conference stretching the Atlantic, and concerts and workshops with noted performers and scholars. Our seminar will provide a first chance to dig intensively into the issues.

Days Start End Bldg Room
W 02:00 PM 05:00 PM FLR 281

 

Pro-Seminar in Musicology and Ethnomusicology (Victor Coelho)

MH 820 (4 credits)

This course examines the methodologies, theories, and landmark publications that both divide and connect the disciplines of Musicology and Ethnomusicology, examining will the individual traits that characterize both fields but stress the common ground that is shared by both. We will confront a large body of readings dealing with how both fields initially surveyed and fenced themselves, but then found common, even essential, ground. Topics will include race, (post)-colonialism, positivism, oral and written traditions, analysis, hegemonies (social and ideological), and globalization, and we will discuss musical traditions spanning African and S. Indian to Western popular music.

The course will include career-oriented units on professional development.

Days Start End Bldg Room
MW 9:30 AM 12:30 PM FLR 281

 

Ethnomusicology and Historical Musicology (Miki Kaneda)

MH 831 (4 credits)

This seminar provides advanced training in recent theories, methods, and research tools used across the fields of musicology and ethnomusicology. Weekly meetings serve as a forum for music scholars to critically examine the boundaries of each field, and discuss new interdisciplinary trajectories in music scholarship.

Days Start End Bldg Room
W 09:30 AM 12:30 PM FLR 281

 

Music and Culture (Thomas Peattie)

MH 833 (4 credits)

This course examines music as both artifact and agent of broader cultural developments. The seminar will focus on specific musical repertories and practices within their relevant historical, social, and political contexts. Topics covered will include gender and sexuality, disability, sound reproduction, listening practices, remediation, and noise.

Days Start End Bldg Room
M 2:00 PM 5:00 PM FLR 281

 

Special Topics in Ethnomusicology (Marié Abe)

MH871 (4 credits)

This interdisciplinary graduate seminar explores the conceptual and political stakes for four formative key words in contemporary theoretical approaches towards sound, music, and performance. The course provides a genealogical perspective on the keywords from various disciplines—from sound studies to gender studies, postcolonial studies, cultural geography, anthropology, popular music studies and political philosophy—, their affiliated research methodologies, and their articulations with musical practices. Our goal is to link students’ individual research interests to generative insights, conceptual and methodological, offered by the keywords we examine.

Days Start End Bldg Room
R 09:30 AM 12:30 PM FLR 281