MSE Colloquium Series

The MSE Colloquium Series features distinguished speakers as well as Division faculty and graduate students addressing topics in the relevant areas of the program: Biomaterials, Electronic and Photonic Materials, Materials for Energy and Environment, and Nanomaterials.

Fall 2012

The MSE Colloquium Series is held on Fridays at 3:00 PM, unless otherwise noted.

September 12, Vladimir Aksyuk, National Institute of Standards and Technology

SPECIAL MSE COLLOQUIUM 12:30 PM in Room 901, 8 St. Mary's Street Coffee and cookies served at 12:15 Plasmonic and Photonic Mechanical Systems With Large Optomechanical Coupling: Measurements and Modeling Abstract: Dielectric micro and nano structures such as waveguides, protonic crystals and microdisks enable efficient 2D and 3D confinement and manipulation... More

September 21, Eric Chason, Brown University

3:00 PM in Room 210, 8 St. Mary’s Street Refreshments served at 2:45 PM Understanding the Evolution of Residual Stress in Polycrystalline Thin Films Abstract: Thin films go through a range of stress states during deposition, often changing from compressive to tensile and back again. The final stress state can vary from highly... More

September 28, Rishi Raj, University of Colorado

3:00 PM in Room 210, 8 St. Mary’s Street Refreshments served at 2:45 PM ElectroChemoMechanical Phenomena: Field Assisted Sintering of Ceramics and Viscous Flow in Glass Abstract: The application of DC electrical fields, of modest strengths, when applied to ceramics and glasses at elevated temperatures produce dramatic new effects: ceramics that normally require several... More

October 5, John Reppy, Cornell University

3:00 PM in Room 210, 8 St. Mary’s Street Refreshments served at 2:45 PM Pursuit of the Elusive Supersolid Abstract: Thirty-five years elapsed between the predictions of a supersolid state of solid 4He by Chester (1968), Andreev and Lfschitz (1969) and Leggett (1970) and the surprising discovery of experimental evidence... More

October 12, Junhong Chen, University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee

 3:00 PM in Room 210, 8 St. Mary’s Street Refreshments served at 2:45 PM Graphene-based Hybrid Nanomaterials for Sensing and Energy Applications   Abstract: Hybrid nanomaterials represent a new class of materials that could potentially display properties beyond those of constituent nanocomponents.  For instance, hybrid nanomaterials with nanoparticles (NPs) distributing on the surface of... More

October 26, Mike Manfra, Purdue University

3:00 PM in Room 210, 8 St. Mary’s Street Refreshments served at 2:45 PM Pushing Materials to the Extreme: Creating GaAs Heterostructures for Quantum Computing Abstract: The possibility of coherent manipulation of quantum-mechanical degrees of freedom in solid-state devices holds great promise for the future of quantum information processing.  In semiconducting materials two... More

November 2, Jeff Tsao, Sandia Labs

3:00 PM in Room 210, 8 St. Mary’s Street Refreshments served at 2:45 PM Ultra-Efficient Solid-State Lighting: Likely Characteristics, Economic Benefits, Technological Approaches Abstract: Technologies for artificial lighting have made tremendous progress over the centuries. At this point in time, there is virtually no question that solid-state lighting (SSL) will eventually displace its... More

November 30, Martin Moskovits, UCSB

3:00 PM in Room 210, 8 St. Mary’s Street Refreshments served at 2:45 PM Putting Plasmons to Work: Electronic and Solar Conversion Opportunities Abstract: Localized Surface Plasmons are collective electronic excitations that can be induced in nanostructures of certain metals and semiconductors. In nanostructures of silver and gold with dimensions much smaller than... More

December 7, Ivan Aprahamian, Dartmouth College

  3:00 PM in Room 210, 8 St. Mary’s Street Refreshments served at 2:45 PM Hydrazone-Based Switches, Fluorophores, and Sensors   Abstract: Can structurally simple molecular switches perform complicated functions? This question is imperative to the field of molecular switches and machines because the multistep synthesis used in the current state-of-the-art systems is a bottleneck... More