Biomedical Laboratory & Clinical Sciences Undergraduate Courses

Click on any course title below to read its description. Courses offered in the upcoming semester include a schedule, and are indicated by a label to the right of the title.

Understanding medical terminology is fundamental for anyone working in the sciences. It is the language of the technician or researcher involved in biotechnology, biomedical investigations, or clinical research. Students learn the analysis and construction of medical words within a context of scientific concepts. After the basics, students learn the anatomy and diseases of the following systems: male and female reproductive, cardiovascular, respiratory, and blood. Technology fee applies to online section only.  [ 2 cr. ]

Section Type Instructor Location Days Times
A1 IND ARR S 9:00 am – 10:50 am
B1 IND T 9:00 am – 10:50 am
OL IND ARR

Prereq: GMS BT 104 (Med Term 1) or consent of program director. Continue building your medical vocabulary as you learn the anatomy and diseases of the following systems: digestive, urinary, lymphatic/immune and endocrine. Technology fee applies to online section only.  [ 2 cr. ]

This course is designed for students who have not taken advanced college math coursework or need to brush up on math skills that are pertinent to laboratory science. Topics include scientific notation, metric system conversions, solution preparation, and graphing. Emphasis is placed on systematic strategies for solving word problems. This course or equivalent is required for BT 208 (Ess. Math for Biotech).  [ 2 cr. ]

Prereq: One semester of biology, two semesters of chemistry and BT 208 (Ess. Math for Biotech) or consent of program director. Provides a theoretical and practical foundation in laboratory science. Students are introduced to the scientific method, laboratory mathematics, chemistry, biochemistry, cell and molecular biology, and immunology. Students learn hands-on solution making, electrophoresis, protein quantitation and other commonly used laboratory methods. Emphasis is placed on lab safety, proper handling of instruments, careful following of written instructions for lab procedures, maintenance of lab notebooks, and data collection, presentation and analysis. Laboratory course.  [ 4 cr. ]

Section Type Instructor Location Days Times
A1 LEC ARR M 5:30 pm – 8:20 pm
A1 LAB W 5:30 pm – 8:20 pm

This course introduces students to the basic sciences of biotechnology (cell biology, immunology, DNA/molecular biology) and describes DNA technologies used in gene therapy and microarray technology and in the production of recombinant protein drugs, antibodies, vaccines, and transgenic animals/plants. The challenges of bringing protein drugs from R&D through large scale manufacturing and the FDA approval process are also discussed. First half of spring semester.  [ 2 cr. ]

Prereq: BT 160. Recent innovations in the fields of molecular biology, immunology and cell biology have provided new insights into the pathogenesis of cancer, infectious diseases, and other intractable diseases. The biotech industry has contributed immensely to this progress and has furthermore accelerated the development of cutting-edge technologies that promise to deliver more effective drugs, vaccines and diagnostics. Biotechnology 2 explores some of the ways in which biotechnology has impacted medicine. Students participate in this exploration through readings of recent scientific articles, class discussions and library/internet research. Second half of spring semester.  [ 2 cr. ]

Prereq: One semester of biology. This course provides a practical understanding of anatomic structures and coordinates this knowledge with the various functions of the human body. Also explored are regulatory processes that integrate cells, tissues, organs and systems. Topics include: organization of the body, tissue development, cellular structure and function as well as the integumentary (skin), skeletal, and muscular systems. The last third of the course focuses on the nervous system. The course incorporates clinical material throughout.   [ 4 cr. ]

Section Type Instructor Location Days Times
A1 IND T 5:30 pm – 8:20 pm
B1 IND W 5:30 pm – 8:20 pm

Prereq: GMS BT 201 (A&P 1) or consent of program director. This course is the second half of an intensive sequence designed to integrate the structure with the function of the human body. The course covers the endocrine, cardiovascular, lymphatic and immune, respiratory, digestive, urinary and reproductive systems. Students study these systems as they relate to homeostasis and clinical disorders. Laboratory exercises on each system are incorporated into the course materials.   [ 4 cr. ]

Prereq: BT 108 (Intro Lab Math) or equivalent. This course prepares students for math calculations commonly used in biotech/biomedical laboratories, and in BLCS courses such as BT 110 (Intro Biomed Lab Sci), BT 411 (Protein Purific.), and BT 454 (Cell Culture). Topics include scientific notation, metric system, solution concentration, dilutions, and logarithmic scales. Some classes are held in the laboratory so that students can apply math skills to solution making, serial dilutions and standard curves. Students also develop strategies for solving word problems and explore the essential elements of data organization, summarization and presentation. Some laboratory exercises.  [ 4 cr. ]

Section Type Instructor Location Days Times
A1 IND ARR S 9:00 am – 11:50 am

Prereq: GMS BT 560 GCP or equivalent or consent of program director. This course introduces students to the structure, content, and regulatory requirements of documents created for the clinical research industry. Students learn about FDA regulations and ICH guidelines for drugs and biologics, the AMA Manual of Style, and other common industry standards. Students learn to apply these industry standards to compose clinical research documents such as a clinical study protocol, informed consent form, and clinical study results.  [ 4 cr. ]

Prereq: BT 110 (Intro Biomed Lab Sci), BT 405 (Biochem), BT 342 (Cell Bio) and knowledge of molecular biology. This course examines the scientific principles of life science instruments commonly found in modern biomedical laboratories. Students learn hands-on the fundamentals of assay development using optical instruments such as, spectrophotometers, fluorescent microscopes, plate readers, bioimagers, and real-time PCR thermocyclers. Sound experimental design, including the use of appropriate controls and consideration of instrument sensitivity, are addressed using the students' own experiments as well as examples from the scientific literature. Students process their data, including microscope images using computer freeware. Laboratory course.   [ 2 cr. ]

Prereq: BT 110 (Intro Biomed Lab Sci). This course provides a detailed knowledge of the role of Current Good Manufacturing Practices (CGMPs) and a Quality Department in the development and manufacture of biopharmaceutical products. Topics include the goals and obligations of the Food and Drug Administration (FDA), a review of the CGMP subparts, and the responsibilities of a Quality Department in ensuring product quality. CGMPs are the FDA's minimal requirements for manufacturing, processing, packing, and holding of a drug product. Emphasis is on understanding the intent and practical application of these regulations. Topics include the regulations and historical perspective, quality control concepts, case studies and examples of FDA enforcement.   [ 4 cr. ]

This course focuses on the development of computer skills essential to modern-day laboratory or clinical researchers. Statistical analysis tools and data presentation techniques are explored using Microsoft Excel, while Microsoft Access is employed for data integration, organization and storage through the development of databases. Microsoft PowerPoint is introduced for clinical research presentations and Microsoft Project Manager is introduced to prepare students for clinical research project management. Students survey existing bioinformatics databases and tools, and examine how to integrate external data sources into their own research. A brief introduction to current trends in computational genomics is also discussed.  [ 4 cr. ]

Section Type Instructor Location Days Times
A1 IND W 5:30 pm – 8:20 pm

Prereq: GMS BT 104 or 106 Medical Terminology or equivalent or permission of program director. This course is designed to familiarize students with concepts of public health as a field of study and how different diseases impact society. We will use the Boston Public Health Commission report on the "Health of Boston" as a template for learning about healthcare disparities, social justice, cancer screening, cancer incidence and mortality, infectious diseases and environmental factors that impact people and population health. Students will begin to make connections between previous coursework, such as cell biology, pathology and anatomy, as well as new concepts, including epidemiology, immunology and experimental designs, as they pertain to the study of human disease. The goal of the course is to give students a knowledge-base that can prepare them for thinking critically should they decide to work in a research, diagnostic or public health setting.   [ 4 cr. ]

Prereq: one semester of biology and two semesters of chemistry. Provides an overview of biochemistry to prepare students for medical school or for advanced undergraduate or general graduate science courses. Topics covered include physical properties of biological molecules; structure and function of proteins, carbohydrates, lipids and nucleic acids; kinetics and mechanism of enzymatic catalysis; and metabolism.  [ 4 cr. ]

This course provides students with an introductory overview of the world of medical devices, from bandages to defibrillators. Students explore what the applicable regulations are, starting with the FDA, and how companies use these regulations to guide the design, development, and marketing of their products. Most classes contain an interesting mix of rules, realities, and renegades, that includes a unique component called, "At the Drugstore," where students focus an educated eye on commonly found items on the shelf. In addition, students learn about jobs and career opportunities within the medical device industry and how to gain entry into the field.  [ 4 cr. ]

Prereq: BT 413 (MolBio) and computer proficiency. Bioinformatics is a practical discipline that informs basic science research as well as pharmaceutical development. The class is designed to introduce key bioinformatic principles and provide many opportunities to put those principles into practice on homework assignments and the term project. Key concepts of molecular biology will be reviewed in the first lecture. Subsequent lectures will introduce bioinformatic techniques in the context of a disease/application area-including infectious disease control, cancer, and next generation sequencing. Data from validated public databases will be used to solve real- world problems in class. At the end of the semester, we will look at exciting, new developments in the field and grapple with contemporary legal/ethical issues in biomedical informatics.  [ 4 cr. ]

Prereq: BT 413 (Mol Bio) & BT 405 (Biochem), or consent of program director. This course introduces students to eukaryotic cell structure and function, and covers various cellular components -- including the plasma membrane, mitochondria and the cytoskeleton -- and examine their roles in the cell. Additionally, students explore essential cellular processes including cell communication and the cell cycle. The course also highlights the unique features of some specialized cell types such as germ and stem cells.  [ 4 cr. ]

Section Type Instructor Location Days Times
A1 IND ARR W 5:30 pm – 8:20 pm

Clinical research auditing ensures that the rights, safety, and well being of the study subject have been protected and the clinical study data are credible. Auditing clinical trial activities provides the strict oversight of performance with the ultimate goal of having a successful submission and identifying opportunities for improvement. In this practical course, students learn how to prepare and conduct audits, write audit observations, create an audit report and review audit report responses. In addition, students learn how to manage audits by an outside agency. Good Clinical Practice (GCP) guidelines and regulatory requirements are reviewed along with exploring the concept of a quality system and the writing of audit program Standard Operating Procedure (SOP). Developing an audit plan is emphasized. Group discussions and role- playing are used to develop practical audit techniques. This class prepares a student for an introductory auditing position within clinical research.  [ 4 cr. ]

Prereq: one semester of biology, two semesters of chemistry, and BT 110 (Intro Biomed Lab Sci). Focuses on techniques used to isolate and identify viral pathogens associated with human disease. Covers the biology, the immune response to viral infections, the genetics of viral replication, and viral pathogenesis. *Offered every other year.  [ 4 cr. ]

Prereq: One semester of biology, two semesters of chemistry. This course introduces students to the fundamental biochemical principles that underlie cell function. Topics include the structure and function of biomolecules, including proteins, lipids, carbohydrates and nucleic acids, as well as the metabolic pathways involved in their synthesis and degradation. Emphasis is given to metabolic regulation and mechanisms of enzyme action.  [ 4 cr. ]

Section Type Instructor Location Days Times
A1 IND ARR S 9:00 am – 11:50 am
B1 IND R 5:30 pm – 8:20 pm

Prereq: one semester of biology, BT 110 (Intro Biomed Lab Sci), and BT 413 (Mol Bio) or BT 436 (Genetics), or consent of program director. Advanced course designed for those considering a clinical or research career in human genetics with an emphasis on clinical cytogenetics (chromosome testing). The course covers types of chromosome abnormalities, methodology, nomenclature and clinical significance in pregnancy, birth defects, and cancer. Laboratory work includes basic blood culture, chromosome preparation, banding, identification and karyotyping. The course also provides an updated review of latest cytogenetic methodology and applications, such as FISH, comparative genomic hybridization (CGH) and array CGH lab. Also offered at graduate level with consent of program director. Laboratory course.  [ 4 cr. ]

Prereq: BT 110 (Intro Biomed Lab Sci), BT 413 (Mol Bio), BT 436 (Genetics) or consent of program director. Advanced course designed for those considering a clinical or research career in human genetics. Emphasis is on clinical molecular genetics (DNA testing). The course covers types of genetic abnormalities, methodology, nomenclature and clinical significance in pregnancy, birth defects, and cancer. Laboratory work includes basic blood extraction, DNA preparation, gel electrophoresis, capillary electrophoresis, sequencing, and identification. The course also provides an updated review of latest molecular genetic methodology and applications, such as copy number analysis, chip based sequencing and next generation sequencing.  Laboratory course.  [ 4 cr. ]

Prereq: BT 342 (Cell Bio) and BT 413 (Mol Bio) or consent of program director. Cell culture techniques and knowledge of genetics is recommended. This course emphasizes the molecular and cellular interactions involved in immune response. Topics covered include innate immunity, antibody structure and function; applications of monoclonal antibodies in biotechnology and medicine; gene rearrangements in Band T cells; cellular cooperation and the role of MHC; tolerance; and immunopathology (hypersensitivity, autoimmunity, transplantation, AIDS, cancer immunity and immunotherapy). Lab techniques include Flow Cytometry (FACs), ELISA, cell proliferation and death, and assays of immune function.   [ 4 cr. ]

Section Type Instructor Location Days Times
A1 IND R ARR M 5:30 pm – 8:20 pm

This course is an integrated course conveying a framework of fundamental introductory concepts of biochemistry, molecular biology, and cell biology, along with essential laboratory methods that are commonly used by researchers in these areas and by the biotechnology industry. The overall goal of the course is to train students for jobs in industry, academia, and the health care sector that apply or require knowledge of these concepts and methods. *Restricted registration to BioScience Academy students.   [ 4 cr. ]

Prereq: BT 110 (Intro Biomed Lab Sci) and BT 208 (Ess. Math for Biotech). Biochemistry and elementary physics are recommended. Familiarizes students with the theory and application of many biochemical techniques involved in protein purification and characterization, such as chromatography (ion exchange, gel permeation, hydrophobic affinity), electrophoresis and blotting techniques. Students learn to think critically about methodology, design a purification scheme, scale it up, and troubleshoot an existing plan. Special problems with recombinant proteins are also covered. The laboratory component includes a wide variety of conventional methods for protein isolation, purification, and characterization. Laboratory course.  [ 4 cr. ]

Prereq: one semester of biology, two semesters of chemistry and BT 110 (Intro Biomed Lab Sci). The course is comprised of a lecture part focusing on the structure, function, and analysis of DNA and RNA and a laboratory component in which students isolate, analyze, and manipulate DNA and RNA in the test tube. Experiments include the isolation of genomic DNA and RNA, followed by their analysis through gel electrophoresis, spectrophotometry, PCR, and blotting techniques. Students are introduced to recombinant DNA technology through bacterial transformation, plasmid preps, mapping of plasmids by restriction digests, and purification of recombinant protein from bacteria by column chromatography. The course also includes a bioinformatics component in which students use a web platform to access various genetic databases, retrieve genetic sequence information and analyze the sequences using free software for translation and restriction enzyme mapping. Laboratory course.   [ 4 cr. ]

Section Type Instructor Location Days Times
A1 LEC ARR R 5:30 pm – 8:20 pm
A1 LAB ARR T 5:30 pm – 8:20 pm

Prereqs: GMS BT110 Intro to Biomed Lab Sciences, GMS BT405 Biochemistry, GMS BT342 Cell Biology (or equivalent courses) and knowledge of molecular biology. This course examines the scientific principles and proper uses of optical instruments commonly found in modern biomedical laboratories. Students will learn hands-on fundamentals of assay development, using instruments such as luminometers, spectrophotometers, fluorometers, fluorescence microscopes, plate readers, bioimagers, and real-time PCR thermocyclers. Principles of sound experimental design, including the use of appropriate controls and consideration of instrument sensitivity, will be addressed using the students' own experiments as well as examples from the scientific literature. Students will process their data, including microscope images using computer freeware. At the end of the course students will present, interpret, and critically discuss their results with faculty and researchers during a poster session.   [ 4 cr. ]

Prereq: one semester of biology and two semesters of chemistry. Provides the student with an understanding of clinically important microorganisms. Students become familiar with the classification, pathogenicity, identification, and prevention and treatment of diseases caused by bacteria, fungi, and parasites as well as the workings of a modern clinical microbiology laboratory. Laboratory course.  [ 4 cr. ]

Section Type Instructor Location Days Times
A1 LEC ARR T 5:30 pm – 8:20 pm
A1 LAB ARR R 5:30 pm – 8:20 pm

Focuses on the successful management of a research or diagnostic laboratory. Topics covered include leadership development, quality improvement, record keeping, process control, computer skills, good laboratory practices, human resources, finance and communication skills. A broader introduction to healthcare management is also included. Guest lecturers from industry, hospitals, and research laboratories are featured.  [ 4 cr. ]

Prereq: BT 104 and BT 342. This course is designed to familiarize students with the cellular and molecular basis of many different types of diseases, including infectious diseases and genetic disorders. Students begin to make connections between previous coursework, such as cell biology and anatomy. Students also learn new concepts, histology, and experimental design, as they pertain to the study of human disease. The goal of the course is to give student a knowledge base that can prepare them for thinking critically about pathology should they decide to work in a laboratory researching disease or to pursue further education in a disease-related field.  [ 4 cr. ]

Prereq: one semester of biology and two semesters of chemistry, BT 342 (Cell Bio) or BT 413 (Mol Bio). This course focuses on human genetics with a strong emphasis on the relationship between DNA structure, disease manifestation, and inheritance. The course reviews the molecular mechanisms underlying the flow of information within a cell from DNA to protein, population genetics, genetics of immunity and cancer, reproductive technologies, epigenetics, genomics and cancer stem cells. The class includes lectures and student presentations.  [ 4 cr. ]

Section Type Instructor Location Days Times
A1 IND ARR W 5:30 pm – 8:20 pm

This online class explores the newest information and legal and bioethical implications in human genetics, using audio-visuals, actual cases, discussions and lecture. Topics include: new reproductive techniques, genetic diseases, prenatal testing and genetic testing, DNA fingerprinting, cloning, and DNA technology. Online only; technology fee applies.  [ 4 cr. ]

This course addresses the legal, ethical and scientific aspects of Assisted Reproduction (also called ART-Assisted Reproductive Techniques). The science of treating infertility has expanded amazingly in the last 15 years, from the use of sperm donors to selling eggs on the internet. Assisted Reproductive techniques are constantly changing and have given rise to many legal cases and ethical questions, which this course will. This course closely examines these legal and ethical questions. Online only; technology fee applies.  [ 4 cr. ]

Section Type Instructor Location Days Times
OL IND ARR

Prereq: GMS BT 413 (Mol Bio) or consent of program director. This course evaluates how cutting-edge technologies in molecular biology contribute to unraveling gene function and biological processes. Students read, discuss and present original research papers about transcriptional regulation, intracellular signaling pathways, cell cycling, apoptosis, cancer, and DNA repair. Technologies discussed include microarrays, RNA silencing, inducible gene expression systems, reporter gene assays, mutagenesis, use of green fluorescent protein for life cell imaging, the creation of transgenic and knockout animals, the Cre/Lox system, and the use of biological databases. Great opportunity to develop and improve your PowerPoint presentation skills.   [ 4 cr. ]

This course provides students with knowledge pertaining to the scientific, political, legal, and ethical issues that drive the advancement and innovation in biotechnology. Students learn how the various drivers of medical biotechnology interact with one another and shape the business and finance of this industry and impact its growth. Students explore intellectual property, R&D, marketing and other issues including what shapes the public view of biotechnology. In addition, students develop their creative thinking and analytical skills and explore their ideas of new vision of biotechnology through discussions, readings, and presentations.   [ 4 cr. ]

Section Type Instructor Location Days Times
A1 IND T 12:00 pm – 2:50 pm

Prereq: one semester of biology, two semesters of chemistry, and BT 405 (Biochemistry). This course explores the role of toxicology as a safeguard to prevent injury from environmental chemicals and as a tool in the investigations of suspicious deaths. Case studies, videos showing how forensic evidence is used in court and group discussions will accompany lectures and demonstrations. Students also explore the role of legal and medical communities as well as governmental agencies in dealing with issues.   [ 4 cr. ]

Prereq: one semester of biology, two semesters of chemistry, BT 110 (Intro Biomed Lab Sci), BT 208 (Essential Math for Biotech) & BT 342 (Cell Bio). This course gives students a foundation in cell culture techniques used in modern cell culture labs. Topics include aseptic technique, freezing and thawing of cell stocks, passage and maintenance of cells, and culture of adherent and suspension cells. Emphasis is on practical hands-on experience. Upon completion of this course, students will be able to understand and follow basic cell culture protocols. Laboratory course.  [ 4 cr. ]

Prereq: A&P 1 & 2 or Med Term 1 & 2 plus GMS BT 342 Cell Biology or consent of program director. This course will present a thorough study of the endocrine system, examining each of its member glands and tissues as well as the mechanisms by which hormones operate between them. Specific topics of endocrine function include: the gastrointestinal tract, energy metabolism, calcium metabolism, hypothalamus-pituitary complex, thyroid gland, adrenal gland and male and female reproductive systems. For each of these topics, there will be a focus on the pathophysiology of relevent endocrine diseases (e.g. type 2 diabetes, osteoporosis) and new developments in their current treatment regimens. 4 cr.  [ 4 cr. ]

Prereq: One semester of biology, two semesters of chemistry and BT 405 (Biochem). This course covers laboratory technologies utilized in the pre-clinical drug development phase with emphasis on the issues and challenges of molecular targeted therapeutics, a new paradigm in drug discovery. In addition, DNA, RNA and protein-based therapeutics, and gene and stem cell therapies are discussed. Students learn about translational technologies used to identify and validate drug targets, as well as lead optimization and selection of drug candidates. A hands-on laboratory component reinforces drug discovery concepts.  [ 4 cr. ]

Section Type Instructor Location Days Times
A1 IND T 5:30 pm – 8:20 pm

Prereq: One semester of biology, two semesters of chemistry, and BT 405 (Biochem). BT 575 (Design & Conduct of Clin Trials) recommended. This course explores how drugs developed at the bench transition to clinical testing and subsequently to the market. The translational approach in drug development is discussed as well as current translational technologies. Topics include the molecular and pathophysiological basis of select diseases; drug design; pre-clinical testing; clinical evaluation of drugs; regulatory requirements for drug approval; and the frontiers of translational research. Lectures are combined with discussions and presentations.  [ 4 cr. ]

Prereq: One semester of biology and two semesters of chemistry, BT 342 (Cell Biology) or BT 413 (Molecular Biology). Many pathological conditions such as diabetes and cancer are caused by perturbations in signal transduction cascades. These cascades convert extracellular signals into changes in gene expression and alterations in cell physiology. The proteins that participate in signal transduction cascades interact in a dynamic, regulated fashion to form multi-protein complexes that allow information processing. This course aims to present in a comprehensive manner, the major signal transduction pathways, their cross-talk, as well as their contribution in maintaining cellular homeostasis. In addition, we will highlight perturbations of these pathways that could lead to development of different diseases as well as the molecular logic that underlies current and future therapies.  [ 4 cr. ]

Prereq: One semester of biology, BT 413 (Mol Bio) or BT 436 (Genetics). This course explores principles of infection, host factors, epidemiology, treatment, prevention, and clinical approach to infection of different organs and systems as well as basic description of medically important infectious agents, i.e. bacteria, viruses, fungi and parasites. Upon successful completion of this course students will understand principles of infection, its epidemiology, treatment, and prevention, as will have knowledge of major pathogens, including all of the significant etiologic agents of newly emerging infections, and will be able to critically assess the outstanding issues of infection control and prevention.   [ 4 cr. ]

Prereq: BT 560 (GCP), BT 575 (Design & Conduct of Clin Trials) or consent of program director. This course integrates a comprehensive review of the good clinical practice core principles and project management strategies applicable to clinical research. Through lectures, case studies and discussions, students examine the concepts and applied techniques for cost estimation, budgeting, allocation of resources, risk management and quality assurance for clinical research projects. Project management principles and methodologies are discussed with a special focus on planning, controlling, and coordinating individual and group efforts.  [ 4 cr. ]

Prereq: one semester of biology, two semesters of chemistry, BT 454 (Cell Culture) and BT 413 (Mol Bio) or consent of program director. Cell culture has become an indispensable tool for all areas of biomedical science. In the course, students develop the necessary routine for work in a cell culture lab by passaging cell lines throughout the course and determining growth characteristics under different conditions. At the same time, students isolate and analyze biomolecules from these cell lines and perform experiments using advanced techniques, such as transfections, reporter gene assays, as well as a variety of optical assays (absorbance, luminescence, and fluorescence assays). At the end of the course, students communicate their work and results during a poster session. Laboratory course.  [ 4 cr. ]

Prereq: BT 405 (Biochem) and BT 413 (Mol Bio) or consent of program director. This course focuses on the cellular and molecular changes that underlie the development and progression of human cancer. Students examine the pathways and processes that involve oncogenes and tumor suppressor genes to understand how they can contribute to cancer. Complex interactions including angiogenesis, tumor immunology, invasion and metastasis are studied as well. In addition,the course covers targeted approaches to cancer therapy and the latest scientific research including cancer epigenetics, microRNAs and cancer stem cells.  [ 4 cr. ]

Section Type Instructor Location Days Times
A1 IND ARR M 5:30 pm – 8:20 pm

Prereq: one semester, biology and 2 semesters of chemistry, BT405 recommended. This course introduces the basic principles of pharmacology and several major classes of therapeutic agents, with attention to their mechanisms of action. Issues of current and future directions in pharmacology are addressed including the source of information about pharmacologic agents, the ethics of human experimentation, the drug development process, and new biotechnological approaches to drug design.  [ 4 cr. ]

Prereq: BT 104 (Med Term) and BT 342 (Cell Bio), or consent of program director. The goal of the course is to give students a fundamental knowledge and practical experience of human histology, pathology and the techniques used to study cells and tissues in the normal and diseased state. This course familiarizes students with biospecimen processing and management at the organ, tissue, cellular and molecular levels. By studying different organs and organ systems, including: gastrointestinal, breast, respiratory, neuro-muscular, skin, brain, kidney and liver, students develop an understanding of the normal and diseased state at the macro and microscopic levels. Furthermore, the course provides hands-on experience, including: dissection, preservation, processing, microtomy, photomicroscopy, macro-photography, electron microscopy, and archiving. Students apply their understanding of medical terminology and cell biology. This course can help prepare a student for graduate work in pathology, for a Pathologists' Assistant program or for a career as a histotechnologists in a diagnostic or research laboratory.  Laboratory course.  [ 4 cr. ]

Section Type Instructor Location Days Times
A1 LEC ARR R 5:30 pm – 8:20 pm
A1 LAB ARR R 5:30 pm – 8:20 pm

Clinical research is conducted to meet the needs of the intended patient population with an investigational medical intervention. But a favorable medical outcome is not the only criterion that is used to judge whether a product can be marketed. Clinical research needs to meet the rigorous standards of the regulators, the ethicists, and the auditors. This course reviews the laws that are in place that are designed to guide the complexities of clinical research. We will use case studies to illustrate what can really happen when clinical studies are conducted -- you may be surprised with what you find. Using group activities and exercises, we will explore the options and approaches used to manage these clinical research issues. 4 cr.   [ 4 cr. ]

Introduces students to the technology, process, and responsibilities of clinical data management. Students examine study setup, case report form (CRF) design, and the data life cycle, including data collection, data validation, coding of adverse events using standard dictionaries (such as ICD-9 or MedDRA), data review, and database lock. Data Management SOP's are discussed within this context. An industry-leading clinical data management system (CDMS) is utilized. Students also explore how new technologies, such as electronic data capture (EDC), affect these processes.  [ 4 cr. ]

Section Type Instructor Location Days Times
A1 IND M 5:30 pm – 8:20 pm

This course introduces the regulatory responsibilities of sponsors, monitors, and investigators conducting clinical trials. Practical information and exercises are designed for the clinical trial professional on procedures for ensuring GCP compliance from an industry perspective. Topics include identifying and selecting qualified investigators, obtaining ethical approval to enroll patients, and initiating sites successfully. The course also covers issues related to collecting required regulatory documentation, verifying high quality data, maintaining study materials accountability, and reporting serious adverse events. Group discussions and guest speakers help students learn the practical skills used in the field.  [ 4 cr. ]

Section Type Instructor Location Days Times
A1 IND ARR W 5:30 pm – 8:20 pm

Prereq: knowledge of biostatistics. This course covers basic principles and current methodologies used in the design and responsible conduct of clinical trials. Topics include statistical design of clinical trials, sample selection, data collection and management, patient recruitment strategies, adverse event reporting, and compliance monitoring. Practical exercises include writing clinical research protocols and informed consent forms, and designing case report forms.   [ 4 cr. ]

Section Type Instructor Location Days Times
A1 IND ARR R 5:30 pm – 8:20 pm

for Fall and Summer 1 semesters. Directed study for degree candidates only. Prereq: Consent of program director. The externship is the capstone project of the Bachelor of Science degree in the BLCS program. The externship objectives are for students to apply knowledge gained from coursework, learn new and challenging biomedical skills and procedures, and understand the purpose for performing these. In addition, students are expected to articulate the goals of their project and how their project fits within the overall mission of the host institution or department. Students also need to demonstrate initiative and curiosity, and be proactive in researching and learning the science behind their project.  [ Var cr. ]

Section Type Instructor Location Days Times
A1 IND ARR

for Spring and Summer 2 semesters. Directed study for degree candidates only. Prereq: Consent of program director. The externship is the capstone project of the Bachelor of Science degree in the BLCS program. The externship objectives are for students to apply knowledge gained from coursework, learn new and challenging biomedical skills and procedures, and understand the purpose for performing these. In addition, students are expected to articulate the goals of their project and how their project fits within the overall mission of the host institution or department. Students also need to demonstrate initiative and curiosity, and be proactive in researching and learning the science behind their project.   [ Var cr. ]

for Fall and Summer 1 semesters. Prereq: 16 credits in clinical research and permission of program director. Directed study offering direct experience with the conduct of a clinical trial. Student will work on a supervised project within an approved clinical research site.   [ Var cr. ]

Section Type Instructor Location Days Times
A1 IND ARR

for Spring and Summer 2 semesters. Prereq: 16 credits in clinical research and permission of program director. Directed study offering direct experience with the conduct of a clinical trial. Student will work on a supervised project within an approved clinical research site.   [ Var cr. ]