Biology Undergraduate Courses

Click on any course title below to read its description. Courses offered in the upcoming semester include a schedule, and are indicated by a label to the right of the title.

Principles of biology: emphasis on cellular structure, heredity, development, and organic evolution. Intended for nonmajors as well as for those concentrating in the health and paramedical sciences. Laboratory course. Three hours lecture, two hours lab.   [ 4 cr. ]

Section Type Instructor Location Days Times
A1 LEC PRB 146 M 6:00 pm – 9:00 pm
C1 LAB SCI 313 W 6:00 pm – 9:00 pm

Gross structure of the human body: skeletal, muscular, nervous, respiratory, circulatory, digestive, urinary, and reproductive systems. Laboratory course. Three hours lecture, two hours lab.   [ 4 cr. ]

Assumes year of high school biology and chemistry. For premedical students and students who plan to concentrate in the natural sciences. Required of biology concentrators. It is recommended that MET CH 101 and CH 102 be taken prior to or concurrently with this sequence. Each course has three hours lecture and three hours lab.   [ 4 cr. ]

Section Type Instructor Location Days Times
A1 LEC CGS 521 M 6:00 pm – 9:00 pm
C1 LAB SCI 311 W 6:00 pm – 9:00 pm

Assumes year of high school biology and chemistry. For premedical students and students who plan to concentrate in the natural sciences. Required of biology concentrators. It is recommended that MET CH 101 and CH 102 be taken prior to or concurrently with this sequence. Each course has three hours lecture and three hours lab. Course examines cells, genetics, development, physiology, and neurobiology.   [ 4 cr. ]

Principles of cellular organization and function: biological molecules, enzymes, bioenergetics, membranes, motility, regulatory mechanisms. Three hours lecture, one hour discussion.   [ 4 cr. ]

Section Type Instructor Location Days Times
B1 LEC CAS 116 T 6:00 pm – 8:00 pm
B1 CAS 116 R 6:00 pm – 7:00 pm
D1 DIS CAS 116 R 7:00 pm – 8:00 pm

MET CH 203 recommended. Principles of heredity as derived from genetic, biochemical, and cytological evidence in animals, plants, and microorganisms. Three hours lecture, one hour discussion.   [ 4 cr. ]

Designed for non-biology majors. Introduction to physiology. Principles of physiology with special reference to humans. Laboratory course. Three hours lecture, three hours lab.   [ 4 cr. ]

Section Type Instructor Location Days Times
B1 LAB SCI 438 T 6:00 pm – 9:00 pm
D1 LEC PRB 146 R 6:00 pm – 9:00 pm

Basic principles of ecology, population dynamics and behavior, interrelationships of plants and animals and their physical and chemical environment. Structure and function of ecosystems and community dynamics. Laboratory course. Three hours lecture, three hours lab.   [ 4 cr. ]

An introduction to the basic physiological principles applied across all levels of organization (cell, tissue, organ system) and intended to prepare the student for more advanced courses in physiology. Topics include homeostasis, neural, muscle, cardiopulmonary, renal, endocrine, and reproductive physiology. Three hours lecture, three hours lab.   [ 4 cr. ]

Ethological approach to animal behavior, including humans; physiological, ontogenetic, and phylogenetic causes and adaptive significance of behavior within an evolutionary framework. Laboratory course. Three hours lecture, three hours lab.   [ 4 cr. ]

Section Type Instructor Location Days Times
A1 LEC BRB 122 M 6:00 pm – 9:00 pm
C1 LAB SCI 415 W 6:00 pm – 9:00 pm

Your brain is a bizarre device, set in place through natural selection of your ancestors and your own experience. One thing that clearly separates your brain from the brain of any other non-human animal is the propensity of your brain for imagination and creativity. In this class we will dive into the neuroscience of imagination: from neurons to memory to neurological control of novel conscious experiences. We will study what makes your brain unique and the selectional forces that shaped the brains of our ancestors. We will discuss what makes human language special and how it evolved. This interdisciplinary class is intended for paleoanthropologists who want to learn neuroscience, psychologists who are interested in the question of the origin of language, biologists who are interested in the uniqueness of the human mind, neuroscientists who want an exposure to paleoanthropology and linguistics, philosophers fascinated by neurological basis of behavior and other students interested in an understanding of the mind of a man and the evolution of the brain.  [ 4 cr. ]

Section Type Instructor Location Days Times
C1 IND PRB 146 W 6:00 pm – 9:00 pm

see department  [ Var cr. ]

Laboratory or field research projects in biology may be chosen under supervision of Department of Biology. Minimum 12 hours per week in laboratory or fieldwork, not including preparation or evaluation time. Both semesters of research may count toward concentration credit in biology if two semesters of work are completed.   [ Var cr. ]

Laboratory or field research projects in biology may be chosen under supervision of Department of Biology. Minimum 12 hours per week in laboratory or fieldwork, not including preparation or evaluation time. Both semesters of research may count toward concentration credit in biology if two semesters of work are completed.   [ Var cr. ]

Structure, synthesis, and control of biologically important macromolecules, especially DNA, RNA, and proteins. Biochemistry of transcription and translation of genetic material. Introduction to molecular problems peculiar to eukaryotes. Three hours lecture, one hour discussion.   [ 4 cr. ]

Ethological approach to animal behavior, including humans; physiological, ontogenetic, and phylogenetic causes and adaptive significance of behavior within an evolutionary framework. Laboratory course. Three hours lecture, three hours lab.   [ 4 cr. ]