Preservation Studies Graduate Courses

Note: Metropolitan College does not offer a graduate degree in preservation studies. Students interested in historic preservation should contact the Preservation Studies Program at amnesp@bu.edu or 617-353-2948 before enrolling in courses. To learn more about the master’s program offered through the Graduate School of Arts & Sciences, please visit the website at bu.edu/amnesp.

Click on any course title below to read its description. Courses offered in the upcoming semester include a schedule, and are indicated by a label to the right of the title.

Visit bu.edu/summer to see the over 700 courses offered this summer.

MET AM 546 Historic Preservation

An introduction to the American preservation movement, including current issues and modern practice. Considers key aspects of the history, theory, and philosophy of historic preservation, and introduces students to key figures in preservation agencies and organizations in this region.  [ 4 cr. ]

MET AM 553 Documenting Historic Buildings and Landscapes

Seminar in architectural and landscape recording techniques involving readings, fieldwork, and writing; projects include research on individual buildings as well as groups of resources. Emphasis on research design and evaluation of evidence.  [ 4 cr. ]

MET AM 747 Historic Building Conservation

Theory and practicalities involved in conservation of historic buildings. This course will cover the history and theory of building conservation architectural investigations of building, including documentary, constructional, and finish materials to materials for conservation.   [ 4 cr. ]

MET AM 751 Financing for Historic Preservation

Begin with a vision of preserving a landmark and adding to the vitality of a community. To succeed, you must realistically assess the feasibility of your vision. A feasibility analysis generally organizes itself into three categories: the physical aspects, markets and income, and financing and valuation. This course focuses on how one determines value and potential income and how to translate that income into financing. The course examines how income and cost tie themselves together through debt and equity and what measures of return are utilized to determine if a project is financially feasible. This course is offered annually during the spring semester.  [ 4 cr. ]

MET AM 754 Planning and Preservation

Planning techniques and public programs relevant to neighborhood conservation and housing rehabilitation. Preparation of neighborhood preservation.  [ 4 cr. ]

MET UA 553 Documenting Historic Buildings and Landscapes

Seminar in architectural and landscape recording techniques involving readings, fieldwork, and writing; projects include research on individual buildings as well as groups of resources. Emphasis on research design and evaluation of evidence.  [ 4 cr. ]