Category: Criminal Justice

U.S. News & World Report Ranks BU Programs in Top 6

January 12th, 2016 in Administrative Sciences, Announcements, Computer Science and Information Technology, Criminal Justice, Featured News Post, MET News, Press Releases

us-news-justice-16 us-news-mscis-16 us-news-business-16

MET’s online Master of Criminal Justice has been ranked the #1 program of its kind by U.S. News & World Report. The 2016 rankings of Best Online Programs also included MET’s fully online master’s in Computer Information Systems—solid at #3 for the second year running—and master’s degree programs in management, now at the #6 position.

Read the full Press Release

Financial Literacy and Issues of Cybercrime

January 8th, 2016 in Criminal Justice, MET News

financial_literacy_cybercrime_issues

Adjunct Associate Professor Kyung-shick Choi, who also serves as coordinator of MET’s graduate certificate and Master of Criminal Justice concentration in Cybercrime Investigation & Cybersecurity, presented at Bridgewater State University’s Financial Literacy Day. The title of his presentation was “Cybersecurity: Threats to Business, Financial Institutions, and Individuals.”

Read more about Professor Choi in the Spring 2015 issue of Metropolitan.

MET Instructor and Top Cop Bill Evans among Bostonians of the Year

December 23rd, 2015 in Criminal Justice, MET News, William B. Evans

evans_honorable_mention_755px-343px

Boston Police Commissioner William Evans, who teaches as part of MET’s Criminal Justice program, was recognized with an honorable mention in the Boston Globe’s latest round of Bostonians of the Year for his standout work overseeing one of the nation’s most stable police departments.

The commissioner is no stranger to awards, having previously won MET’s Roger Deveau Part-Time Faculty Award for Excellence in Teaching, and earned the accolades because, according to the Globe, “With Evans at the helm, Boston has mostly avoided the poisoned atmosphere where police shootings and brutality have opened festering divides, especially in minority neighborhoods.”

For more on Commissioner Evans, including the way his upbringing shaped his views on law enforcement, visit the Boston Globe.

MET Criminal Justice Expert Weighs in on Local Police Allegations

November 24th, 2015 in Criminal Justice, MET News, Shea Cronin

city_police_755px-343px

Dracut police face scrutiny that they are enforcing an unconstitutional traffic policy, and a recent investigation into the allegations sought the expertise of MET Assistant Professor of Criminal Justice Shea Cronin, who suggests that such unofficial policies may be common: “There’s often some form of de facto quota system in many police department agencies.”

Learn more at the Lowell Sun.

MET Criminal Justice Professor Provides Policing Insight for WGBH

November 23rd, 2015 in Criminal Justice, Featured News Post, MET News, Shea Cronin

Policing_Insight

The dynamic between communities and those tasked with policing them has never been under greater scrutiny. In a recent examination of Cambridge police, and the way they have evolved their practices since a high-profile 2009 incident that resulted in the arrest of a highly-regarded Harvard professor, WGBH consulted Dr. Shea Cronin, Metropolitan College assistant professor of criminal justice, for his expertise on the dynamic between law enforcement and those they are sworn to serve and protect.

Read more about Cambridge’s community-minded policing, including
Dr. Cronin’s insights, at WGBH.

Cybercrime Expert Lays Out Best Defenses and Investigative Practices In New Book

November 9th, 2015 in Criminal Justice, Faculty News, MET News

shutterstock_160851050

Adjunct Associate Professor of Criminal Justice Kyung-shick Choi, who coordinates Boston University’s Master of Criminal Justice concentration and Graduate Certificate in Cybercrime Investigation & Cybersecurity, recently released Cybercriminology and Digital Investigation (LFB Scholarly Publishing, October 2015). In the book, Choi updates conventional criminological theories with an interdisciplinary model designed to combat emerging cybercrime threats to individuals, institutions, and matters of national and international security. Earlier this year, MET’s online master’s program in Criminal Justice was ranked #2 in the nation by U.S. News & World Report.

Learn more about Cybercriminology and Digital Investigation.

New Curriculum Takes a Bite out of Cybercrime

September 2nd, 2015 in Computer Science and Information Technology, Criminal Justice, MET News

Cyber Investigation and Cybercriminology
A new Cybercrime Investigation & Cybersecurity sequence prepares students for the forensics exam and a career in cybercriminology. The four-course sequence is available two ways: as a graduate certificate or a concentration in the Master of Criminal Justice (MCJ) program.

See the news release »

Homeland Security Seeks IS and Cybersecurity Pros

August 20th, 2015 in Computer Science and Information Technology, Criminal Justice, MET News

cybersecurity

Looking to put your technical or forensic skills to good use? The Department of Homeland Security (DHS) is actively recruiting professionals skilled in information systems and cybersecurity for jobs at the National Cybersecurity and Communications Integration Center (NCCIC).

Learn about DHS cybersecurity careers and see current openings »

Shedding Light on Darknet Risks

July 6th, 2015 in Conferences, Criminal Justice, Events, Faculty News, MET News, Programs

Shedding Light on Darknet Risks

Adjunct Associate Professor of Criminal Justice Kyung-shick Choi (MET’02) addressed the 2015 International Symposium on Cyber Crime Response in Seoul, South Korea, on June 9. His topic was “New Challenges for Law Enforcement: The Prevalence of ‘Darknet’ Marketplaces and Synthetic Drug Abuse.”

Read more about Dr. Choi and MET’s cybercrime/cybersecurity curriculum.

Body Cameras Just Part of a Solution, says MET’s Cronin

May 3rd, 2015 in Criminal Justice, Faculty News, MET News, Programs, Shea Cronin

Body Cameras Just Part of a Solution, says MET’s Cronin

Will body cameras curb the episodes of police violence so prevalent in the news today? Shea Cronin, assistant professor of criminal justice, offered his insights to WHDH.com. “The reason why body cameras have received such attention and why they seem like such an easy fix is because it’s a piece of technology,” Shea explains. “Everybody knows how to use it. It can be attached easily. But if it’s not going to be part of a wider accountability system it’s just simply not going to be effective enough.”

Read the story »