Category: Programs

City Planning & Urban Affairs Director Champions ‘Parks for All’ at Boston Public Library

September 19th, 2018 in City Planning & Urban Affairs, Madhu Dutta-Koehler, MET News

Boston Public Gardens

In her academic work, Dr. Madhu Dutta-Koehler explores the realities of climate change adaptation in urban settings and the need for practical solutions to the coming challenges. Green spaces need to be preserved, the director of the MET City Planning & Urban Affairs programs and associate professor of the practice says, and she was invited to speak on the topic last month at the Norman B. Leventhal Map & Education Center at the Boston Public Library. Held on Thursday, August 23, the forum was entitled, “Parks for All: How City Parks Address Inequity,” and was attended by roughly 200 people.

Boston’s parks, which she called “ribbons of green” against the city’s urban landscape during her lecture, must be accessible to all walks of the populace to be effective for the greater community.

Watch the discussion at the WGBH Forum Network.

Gastronomy Student Named a ‘Survivor’

September 11th, 2018 in Gastronomy, MET News

Lyrsa Torres

Metropolitan College’s Master of Liberal Arts in Gastronomy degree program is unique for the interdisciplinary approach it brings to food and food culture studies, and that versatile skill set will come in handy for student Lyrsa Torres as she competes in the upcoming season of Survivor. Torres, who is tailoring her degree with a History & Culture concentration, even told CBS.com that one of her biggest pet peeves is a dirty kitchen.

Speaking with BU Today, Lyrsa revealed herself to be a big fan of the franchise, now in its twenty-third season. “I always wanted to be part of this amazing show,” she said. Read more here.

More Segregation Leads to Greater Likelihood of Gun Death for Racial Minorities, MET Prof’s Study Finds

August 9th, 2018 in Criminal Justice, MET News, Shea Cronin

crime scene

MET Assistant Professor of Criminal Justice Shea Cronin has co-authored a study published in the Journal of the National Medical Association that finds a correlating link between racial segregation in housing and gun-violence homicide rates. The School of Public Health-led research—which controlled for such factors as economic standing, education, and employment status—used a metric that scores neighborhood integration on a 100-point scale and concluded that “[f]or every 10-point increase in the index of dissimilarity, the …ratio of black to white firearm homicide fatality rates increased by 39 percent.”

Read more here.

MET’s Top Gastronome Offers Muffin Primer

August 1st, 2018 in Gastronomy, MET News

Muffins

As director of Metropolitan College’s unique Gastronomy master’s degree program, Associate Professor of the Practice Megan Elias is a trusted expert on the convergence of food, culture, and history. So when a Thrillist reporter wanted to investigate how muffins became a breakfast staple, Elias was called in for her qualified insight.

“Muffins were originally a small, yeast-risen breadstuff, pretty common in English homes,” Elias said, noting that the pastry’s predecessor, called “gems,” rose in popularity in the early part of the 19th century. Muffins as we think of them today became prominent in the 1970s, Elias explained, as a byproduct of broader social progress. “As more middle class women entered the paid workforce, there were fewer people at home to prepare and clean up a full breakfast in the morning, so the concept of ‘grab and go’ entered middle class culture,” she shared.

Read more about muffins’ place at the breakfast table in Thrillist.

New Culinary Arts Award Honors Program’s Founder

July 27th, 2018 in Culinary Arts, Gastronomy, MET News, Rebecca Alssid

A generous gift of $10,000 from Mary Ann Esposito and the Mary Ann Esposito Foundation means a new scholarship has been cooked up for students of the culinary arts at Boston University.

Named for the dedicated founder and longtime administrator of BU’s Culinary Arts and Gastronomy programs, the Rebecca Alssid Award honors Ms. Alssid’s legacy of leadership in the appreciation of food and food culture.

To qualify for the award, candidates, who must have completed the Culinary Arts Certificate Program, study key regions of Italy to assess their notable delicacies. They then are asked to submit a 10-page scholarly work dedicated to the history, agriculture, traditions, and recipes of their chosen Italian region. In addition, they are to develop and present a four-course meal representing their findings, paired with wine. The winner, or winners, will be decided by the Programs in Food & Wine director in consultation with the award committee. As victors, they will receive a certificate and an award of up to $1,000.

It is sponsored by the Mary Ann Esposito Foundation, which supports culinary scholarships in programs that provide students with a rich and grounded understanding of food history, culture, and function.

Criminal Justice Faculty, Alum Examine Positive Impact of Higher Education on Incarcerated Women

July 12th, 2018 in Criminal Justice, Danielle Rousseau, MET News

Danielle Rousseau, Jillian Baranger, Mary Ellen Mastrorilli

The social and personal benefits of a collegiate education on incarcerated men have long been academically proven, but a new paper authored by a MET Criminal Justice master’s program alum in conjunction with faculty brings new light to the positive impact an education can have on women serving prison time.

“Doing Time Wisely: The Social and Personal Benefits of Higher Education in Prison” was written by Jillian Baranger (MET’16) along with Dr. Mary Ellen Mastrorilli, associate chair and associate professor of the practice of Applied Social Sciences, and Dr. Danielle Rousseau, a MET assistant professor and expert on issues related to gender, mental health, and trauma among the incarcerated. The paper finds that providing imprisoned individuals with the chance to pursue an education can “help to facilitate resilience in taking on the systemic challenges of reentering communities” and build feelings of personal development, resilience, and empowerment. Published in The Prison Journal, their research also found evidence “that engagement in prison higher education can support the development of coping skills and foster transformative self-inquiry and personal development.”

Read the paper here.

Admin Science Professor Wins Best Presentation at Japanese Healthcare Management Conference

July 5th, 2018 in Administrative Sciences, John Maleyeff, MET News

John Maleyeff awarded best presentation certificate

MET Associate Professor of the Practice of Administrative Sciences John Maleyeff was awarded the Best Presentation Certificate for a dialogue he led at the 2018 International Conference in Healthcare Service Management. Held at Japan’s University of Tsukuba, June 8–10, the gathering assembled healthcare management and medical informatics practitioners and academics to explore the innovations, practical challenges, possibilities, and pitfalls faced by those in the field. Dr. Maleyeff’s winning “Biomedical Data Mining” presentation was based on his paper, “Cancer Screening Decision Making Models Based on Health Status Utilities,” co-authored by Master of Science in Actuarial Science student and graduate assistant Danrong Chen. It focused on the study’s design, methodology, and preliminary findings.

MET Cybersecurity Maven Lends Expertise to Colombian Broadcast

June 26th, 2018 in Criminal Justice, MET News

Professor Choi with Colombian National Police Radio & TV

Dr. Kyung-shick Choi, faculty coordinator for the Metropolitan College Cybercrime Investigation & Cybersecurity master’s and graduate certificate criminal justice programs, was invited to speak with Colombian National Police Radio & Television to share his insights into the rising tide of online malfeasance.

“Cybercrime and information security breaches are growing transnational problems,” Dr. Choi explained during an interview. “Media reports of the increasingly frequent security breaches, ID theft, and internet fraud involving various businesses have made the business consumers more aware of, and concerned with, the security of their personal information,” he said.

Dr. Choi also discussed his aims for the treatise he wrote on the subject, Cybercriminology and Digital Investigation, which was recently translated into a Spanish-language edition with the help of coauthor and MET alum Major Toro Alvarez. “We hope this book is going to guide new researchers, scholarship, and investigators in Latin America and to improve the understanding of the cybercriminology disciplines,” Choi remarked, going on to say, “The additional hope is…  to promote greater global cybersecurity and educate [the] global law enforcement community.”

Read the full Interview Transcript

New Associate Professor for Department of Computer Science

June 21st, 2018 in Computer Science and Information Technology, Guanglan Zhang, MET News

zhang-in-classroom

Dr. Guanglan Zhang has been promoted from assistant to associate professor of computer science. She is a lead researcher in MET’s Health Informatics Research Lab, a part of the Master of Science in Computer Information Systems concentration in Health Informatics and the Health Informatics Graduate Certificate offered at MET. Co-inventor on two patents and a key participant on two currently active grants, Dr. Zhang has published 51 articles in biomedical and bioinformatics journals and seven book chapters, in addition to developing more than 15 online computational systems. Her health informatics studies focus specifically on the development of computational algorithms in biomedical and health sciences.

Read an in-depth interview with Dr. Zhang here.

Gastronomy Student Becomes MET’s First Pardee Summer Fellow

May 15th, 2018 in Gastronomy, MET News

aquaculture

Ariana Gunderson, a standout student in the MET Master of Liberal Arts in Gastronomy program, has been awarded a Graduate Summer Fellowship from the Frederick S. Pardee Center for the Study of the Longer-Range Future.

Now in its 11th year, the Pardee Graduate Summer Fellows program enables outstanding BU students to spend 10 weeks at the Pardee House developing research papers that are then considered for publication from the center. Gunderson, who is the first MET student to win the fellowship, will study the impact of climate change and how Massachusetts aqua-culturists perceive, experience, and prepare for its effects.

“I am proud and excited to represent the Gastronomy program and Metropolitan College in this prestigious fellowship,” Gunderson said.

Read more about the Pardee Center Graduate Summer Fellows here.