Category: Featured News Post

IRNOP Conference Hosted by MET June 11–14, 2017

June 13th, 2017 in Featured News Post, MET News, Press Releases, Project Management

IRNOP Conference Hosted by MET

This year’s International Research Network on Organizing by Projects (IRNOP) conference will take place on Boston University’s Charles River Campus from June 11 through June 14. The focus of this year’s conference is “The Modern Project: Mindsets, Toolsets, and Theoretical Frameworks.”

Read the full Press Release

MET Health Informatics Concentration Recognized By CAHIIM

May 8th, 2017 in Computer Science and Information Technology, Featured News Post, Health Informatics, MET News, Press Releases

MET Health Informatics Concentration Recognized By CAHIIM

BU’s Metropolitan College is one of only eight U.S. institutions offering a master’s program in health informatics that is accredited by the Commission on Accreditation for Health Informatics and Information Management Education (CAHIIM). The accreditation applies to the Master of Science in Computer Information Systems with Health Informatics concentration, and provides assurance that the curriculum meets or exceeds the standards set by the CAHIIM Board of Directors.

The MS in Computer Information Systems, Health Informatics concentration, is offered on campus and online. The online program is ranked #4 among the nation’s Best Online Graduate Computer Information Technology Programs by U.S. News & World Report.

Read the full Press Release

Trio of Gastronomy Students Nab Julia Child Awards

April 19th, 2017 in Featured News Post, Gastronomy, MET News, Programs

Valencia K. Baker receives Julia Child award

The Julia Child Awards for Academic Excellence are conferred upon BU Gastronomy students that excel in the field of interdisciplinary food studies, and this past semester saw the prize granted to a triumvirate of budding gastronomes. Valencia K. Baker, Samantha Dolph, and James Moran were the Fall 2016 winners of the Julia Child Awards, earning them each a certificate and a $500 scholarship.

Students were nominated for the exceptional work done in individual classes by their instructors. Ms. Baker was cited for her studies regarding the food security of Cubans in Food Policy and Food Systems. Ms. Dolph studied the impact of eating disorders on people along the gender and sexuality spectrum as part of Introduction to Gastronomy: Theory and Method. Mr. Moran explored the social ramifications of New York City’s attempts to regulate carbonated soda consumption in his Eating for Change: Ethical Eating and Food Movements studies. Metropolitan College proudly lauds the achievements of the students granted the award, which is made possible by the generosity of the Julia Child Foundation.

Border Sheriff—and MET Criminal Justice Vet—Offers Fresh Ways to Consider Proposed Mexican Wall

April 11th, 2017 in Alumni News, Featured News Post, MET News

Border Sheriff—and MET Criminal Justice Vet—Offers Fresh Ways to Consider Proposed Mexican Wall

Arizona Sheriff Mark Napier (MET ’04) knows his way around the Mexican border. After all, the law-enforcement officer and coordinator of Metropolitan College’s top-ranked online Master of Criminal Justice program is tasked with policing a 125 mile stretch of the international boundary, giving him unique perspective on the challenges facing the immigration hotbed.

Elected sheriff of Arizona’s Pima County in November, Napier spoke with the BBC’s Eddie Mair to offer insight into President Donald J. Trump’s proposed boundary wall along the U.S./Mexican border.

“I think ‘the wall’ as a term is analogous to a lot of things,” he explained. “We talk, in this country, a lot about a traditional wall, meaning bricks and mortar or some sort of physical barrier, and there are places on the border that simply do not lend themselves to what we would categorize as a traditional wall,” he added, citing topographical and structural concerns.

“So I think when we speak of a wall, we need to think of it as an analogous term to meaning, potentially, human resources, technology, and where appropriate, physical borders,” Napier said.

For more, tune into the BBC.

Cultural Entrepreneurship Teachers Advocate for Business/Art Collaborations

March 31st, 2017 in Arts Administration, Faculty News, Featured News Post, MET News

Cultural Entrepreneurship Teachers Advocate for Business/Art Collaborations

Among the most important lessons students in the Metropolitan College Arts Administration program learn is how to channel the collective power of art and culture with business, technology, and social impact. Jeannette Guillemin, director ad interim, School of Visual Arts, CFA, and Wendy Swart Grossman, nonprofit and foundation consultant, contributed a co-authored chapter to Creating Cultural Capital (University of Chicago Press, 2015) as well as designed MET AR 789 Cultural Entrepreneurship. The course explores the emerging trends in cultural entrepreneurship and how to harness the creative mindset to produce successful, economically viable ventures. The course, now taught by Swart Grossman, explores business models, storytelling, design, leadership, and financials. Following November’s election, the pair put on a conference that explored the potential for art and business organizations to join forces and create economic opportunities while addressing social issues.

The Arts & Ideas in Action Symposium brought together over 200 people from the private, nonprofit and governmental sectors as well as BU faculty, students, and academics.

Read more about the event in Exposure.

Boston Police Commissioner and MET Law Enforcement Expert Preaches Alcohol Safety

March 29th, 2017 in BU Today Features, Criminal Justice, Faculty News, Featured News Post, MET News, Programs, William B. Evans

Boston police commissioner Wiliam Evans

Boston Police Commissioner William Evans, who previously was awarded the Metropolitan College Roger Deveau Part-Time Faculty Award for Excellence in Teaching for his work as an instructor in MET’s Criminal Justice program, delivered an address on the dangers of college drinking and the challenges it poses to law enforcement during a Boston Town & Gown Association meeting in early March.

See photos of the event at BU Today.

Prisoner Safety a Human Rights Issue, Says MET Corrections Authority

March 21st, 2017 in Criminal Justice, Faculty News, Featured News Post, Mary Ellen Mastrorilli, MET News, Programs

Prisoner Safety a Human Rights Issue, Says MET Corrections Authority

According to Dr. Mary Ellen Mastrorilli—MET professor, recognized incarceration authority, and faculty coordinator for MET’s online Master of Criminal Justice program—prisoner’s rights issues as they relate to sexual assault must be treated as human rights issues, and protecting them is a key tenet to ethical leadership.

In an essay featured in the March/April issue of American Jails magazine, Dr. Mastrorilli explores the ways leadership practices—like those taught in the MET’s Master of Criminal Justice with a concentration in Strategic Management program—can be best integrated into the corrections system.

Read more in American Jails magazine.

No Timetable for Certified Financial Planners at CPE

March 3rd, 2017 in Featured News Post, Financial Planning, MET News, Programs

No Timetable for Certified Financial Planners at CPE

Becoming a Financial Planner through Boston University’s Center for Professional Education can take time. In fact, for financial journalist Robert Powell (COM’90), a 20-year hiatus was just a speed-bump between beginning the Financial Planning program and resuming his studies in preparation for the CFP® exam.

Powell shared with MarketWatch readers that though professional obligations had interrupted his original plans in the program, he is now completing his CPE studies in pursuit of the highly respected CFP certification, which the experienced financial expert calls “the ‘gold standard’ in the financial planning profession.”

Read more in MarketWatch.

Food Business is Booming, Says Gastronomy Alum

February 15th, 2017 in Alumni News, Featured News Post, Gastronomy, MET News

Food Business is Booming, Says Gastronomy Alum

The food industry is growing in rapid and innovative ways, according to one MET alum, who says some businesses are even turning down opportunities for funding. After earning the Master of Liberal Arts in Gastronomy from BU, Natalie Shmulik (MLA’13) now serves a food business consultant at a Chicago-based food incubator, and she spoke with Forbes magazine about the many ways people are finding funding in food.

Read more of Shmulik’s advice to aspiring food entrepreneurs in Forbes.

MET Fundraising Expert Cautions Activists

February 10th, 2017 in Faculty News, Featured News Post, MET News, Programs

MET Fundraising Expert Cautions Activists

Social activism is on the upswing, but a MET authority on high-end fundraising is urging advocates to be circumspect in the stands they take on where money-raising events should be held. Mary Simboski, who teaches in the Fundraising Management Graduate Certificate program, warned that once expensive venues have been booked to host charitable events, attempts to reschedule them or change locations can prove costly and ultimately hurt the causes they seek to advance.

Read more in The Big Story, from the Associated Press.