Category: Faculty News

Facing the Holidays in Prison

December 23rd, 2016 in Mary Ellen Mastrorilli, MET News, Social Sciences

Facing the Holidays in Prison

Dr. Mary Ellen Mastrorilli, associate professor of the practice and associate chair of Applied Social Sciences, was quoted in a Chicago Tribune article on families that face the holidays while a loved one is in prison. Dr. Mastrorilli, who spent two decades working in correctional facilities, and who is faculty coordinator for the online Master of Criminal Justice program, is quoted on the challenges prison staff also face during the holiday season.

Read the full story.

MET Instructor’s New Winery Gives Students a Taste of Winemaking

December 15th, 2016 in Faculty News, Food & Wine, MET News

MET Instructor’s New Winery Gives Students a Taste of Winemaking

Certified Specialist of Wine Jacquelyn Groeper, who teaches in the Metropolitan College Certificate Program in Wine Studies—and who is also a graduate of the program—recently opened Artis Winery in Pembroke, Massachusetts. Her winery has already hosted MET’s Red Winemaking Laboratory—taught by Groeper and Master of Wine Bill Nesto—which offers lessons on how to process grapes, vinify them, and mature, analyze, stabilize, bottle, and label the resulting wine. Those interested in learning how to make wine should attend the Winemaking Information Session on Friday, April 21, 2017, 6–7:30 p.m., for information about the next laboratory.

Read more about Groeper’s Artis Winery in the Boston Globe.

What Constitutes “Reasonable Suspicion”?

October 31st, 2016 in Criminal Justice, MET News, Shea Cronin

What Constitutes “Reasonable Suspicion”?

Assistant Professor of Criminal Justice Shea Cronin was quoted in a recent Christian Science Monitor article entitled “‘Reasonable suspicion’ defined: Black men who run from police can’t be assumed guilty.” The article outlines a Massachusetts Supreme Judicial Court ruling that takes aim at racial profiling and states that black males “when approached by the police, might just as easily be motivated by the desire to avoid the recurring indignity of being racially profiled as by the desire to hide criminal activity.”

According to Dr. Cronin, “The courts seem to be consistently sending signals to law enforcement agencies that they have to pay closer attention to the meaning of reasonable suspicion in their interactions with the public.”

Read the full article here.

Corrections Expert Joins Community Effort to Reduce Racial Disparities

October 25th, 2016 in Danielle Rousseau, Events, Faculty News, MET News

Corrections Expert Joins Community Effort to Reduce Racial Disparities

Dr. Danielle Rousseau, a Metropolitan College Criminal Justice professor and faculty coordinator of the Boston University Prison Education Program, will give a presentation on how the BU community can affect change in bringing greater harmony and equality to vulnerable populations, close achievement gaps, and promote positive social growth in the region.

The Reducing Disparities and Promoting Well-Being in Boston: The Role of the BU Community event is part of the Boston University Initiative on CitiesReducing Disparities series, which seeks to address racial inequities and explore the positive role the University can play in the surrounding community.

Learn more about the event—held Wednesday, October 26, at Questrom School of Business—on their website, and register to attend.

MET Arts Admin Director Backs Summery Greek Exhibit

September 29th, 2016 in Arts Administration, Faculty News, MET News

MET Arts Admin Director Backs Summery Greek Exhibit

A new art exhibit in Athens, Greece is being curated by Metropolitan College Arts Administration Program Director Lanfranco Aceti. Held at the Kalfayan Galleries, “Remains of a Summer Bliss” is the work of Greek-born, London-based artist Bill Balaskas, who Aceti calls “one of the most exciting, politically and socially engaged artists working in Europe today.”

Read more about the exhibit here.

Health Care Policy Expert and MET Chair Diagnoses Hidden Costs of Transplants

August 17th, 2016 in Administrative Sciences, Faculty News, John Sullivan, MET News

Health Care Policy Expert and MET Chair Diagnoses Hidden Costs of Transplants

MET Associate Professor John D. Sullivan says that managing the cost of health care and wellness faces a crossroads, and that the most remedying route is early action.

Dr. Sullivan, who chairs MET’s Department of Administrative Sciences and specializes in health care policy and finance, rebutted a recent op-ed relating to organ donation and transplants in the Boston Globe, writing that well-intentioned incentive programs can often lead to unintended consequences, where “the poor. . . ultimately pay the price.”

Read more of Dr. Sullivan’s perspective in the Boston Globe.

MET Food & Wine Master and Wife Pen Chianti Tome

June 17th, 2016 in Faculty News, Featured News Post, Food & Wine, Gastronomy, MET News, William Nesto

MET Food & Wine Master and Wife Pen Chianti Tome

William Nesto—a senior lecturer in MET’s Food & Wine program and one of only 312 certified Masters of Wine in the world—has co-authored a new book with his wife, Frances Di Savino, which celebrates the history of the modern wine appellation known as Chianti Classico. Their book, “Chianti Classico: The Search for Tuscany’s Noblest Wine,” published by University of California Press, is due in stores September 20, 2016, just in time to accompany the Level 1 course for the four-part Wine Studies certificate program in which Nesto is an instructor.

New Food Archeology Encyclopedia from Gastronomy Professors Comes “Highly Recommended”

June 17th, 2016 in Anthropology, Faculty News, Food & Wine, Gastronomy, Mary Beaudry, MET News

New Food Archeology Encyclopedia from Gastronomy Professors Comes “Highly Recommended”

MET Gastronomy instructors and anthropologists Mary Beaudry and Karen Metheny edited “Archaeology of Food: An Encyclopedia,” the first reference work devoted to the study of food and foodways through archaeology, which is now being lauded for its ability to help students “understand the complexity of what may first appear to be a simple subject—the food eaten by peoples of the past.” A review from CHOICE, a review journal for academic libraries, deemed the book to be “highly recommended,” for students of all levels. Read the review of the book by Beaudry—a professor of archaeology, anthropology, and gastronomy—and Metheny—a full-time gastronomy lecturer and visiting archaeology researcher—at Choice Reviews.

MET Health Communication Expert Offers Guidance in New Book

June 17th, 2016 in Faculty News, Health Communication, MET News

MET Health Communication Expert Offers Guidance in New Book

Dr. Domenic Screnci, co-founder and advisor to the Metropolitan College online Master of Science in Health Communication program, has released a new book outlining optimal public health teaching methods, for both students and practitioners. “Course Design for Public Health: A Competency Based Approach,” co-authored by Screnci and others, lays out a step-by-step, systemic approach to designing and delivering health education programs and courses. The methods described have been field-tested by the authors in more than 20 countries in Africa, Asia, and the Americas.

City Planning & Urban Affairs Scholars Join City’s ‘Imagine Boston 2030’ Discussion

June 1st, 2016 in Academic Events, City Planning & Urban Affairs, Madhu Dutta-Koehler, MET News

City Planning & Urban Affairs Scholars Join City’s ‘Imagine Boston 2030’ Discussion

“Imagine Boston 2030”—the City of Boston’s first comprehensive, city-wide planning project in more than 50 years—is a campaign that evidences the vital roles City Planning & Urban Affairs play in preparing for the future. To mark its kickoff, Boston University’s Initiative on Cities held a “Sharing Visions, Shaping Cities” seminar. The panel was moderated by City Planning & Urban Affairs Program Coordinator Madhu Dutta-Koehler, who was joined by scholars, entrepreneurs, journalists, the executive director of Imagine Boston 2030, and others to discuss the challenges and opportunities on the city’s horizon, and the benefits of community-oriented cooperation.