LL.M. Programs

Back to Meet the Students

Simuzar "Sima" Feyzullayeva

Sima Feyzullayeva
Considering the current development of the legal market and the increasing level of competition, I decided that having an LL.M. degree from a top law school, such as BU, would greatly assist me in achieving my legal career goals.

Biography

Simuzar joined BU Law as a Muskie Fellow. She received her LL.M. from Baku State University with a concentration in commercial law. She also received her LL.B. from the same institution in 2008. While earning her degrees, Simuzar interned at Baku Local Economic Court, Binagadi District Court, Sabail District Court, and Sabail District Prosecutor’s Court. She is a member of the Woman Bar Association as well as the Legal Education Society, a local NGO. Besides her native language of Azerbaijani, Simuzar is fluent in Russian, Turkish, English, and basic German.

Q & A with Simuzar

Why did you decide to pursue an LL.M. degree?

Considering the current development of the legal market and the increasing level of competition, I decided that having an LL.M. degree from a top law school, such as BU, would greatly assist me in achieving my legal career goals. Having worked for an international company that conducted business with many U.S. companies, banks and affiliates, I thought it was important to get more grounding in U.S. law to deal with the issues faced by those companies. In addition, since I received my previous legal education in a civil law country, pursuing an LL.M. degree in the U.S. gave me a chance to study a wide range of law courses based on the common law system.

What has been the biggest change between law school and your classes here in the LL.M.?

The biggest difference is the system— we mostly studied case law here at BU. In Azerbaijan, I had to study legal issues based on particular codes and legislation for each area of the law. Unlike the format of classes in Azerbaijan, here, classes involve a lot of discussion. This gives students more of an opportunity to become familiar with the practical aspects of the issues being discussed.

What have you enjoyed most about living and studying in Boston?

This is my first time in the U.S., and I love the lifestyle, culture and traditions. Also, people here are really warm. I’ve attended lots of social events, and I’ve met many new friends.

Do you have any advice for students applying to the LL.M. program at BU?

Besides having strong faculty and a wide variety of law courses, BU also gives foreign students a chance to put their academic knowledge into practice through participation in voluntary pro-bono work. The School also hosts a number of events which bring lawyers working in various fields—like state agencies or private companies—to campus to discuss challenging issues in U.S. law today. I would definitely encourage prospective students to attend those events and participate in the pro-bono program to expand their legal knowledge.

What do you plan to do after graduation?

I’m planning to go back home and work for the government or a law firm; I have a couple of offers to consider. I’m also planning to get my Ph.D. either in the U.S. or in Europe.