Boston University School of Law

 

The International Criminal Tribunal for Rwanda

Robert D. Sloane

Robert D. Sloane, "The International Criminal Tribunal for Rwanda," The Rules, Practice, and Jurisprudence of International Courts and Tribunals, Chapter 9 (Chiara Giorgetti ed., Brill, forthcoming)
Boston University School of Law Working Paper 11-56
(December 8, 2011)

Abstract

This essay will appear as the ninth chapter of The Rules, Practice, and Jurisprudence of International Courts and Tribunals (Chiara Giorgetti ed., Brill, forthcoming). It covers the origin, establishment, organization, jurisdiction, and procedures of the International Criminal Tribunal for Rwanda (ICTR). It then explains and analyzes a selection of the ICTR’s significant contributions to international criminal jurisprudence, covering, in particular, the Akayesu; Kayishema & Ruzindana; Nahimana, Barayagwiza & Ngeze (“The Media Case”); and Baglishema cases. The issues therefore include, among others, specific intent in the definition of genocide, rape as a modality of genocide, jurisdiction to prosecute violations of Additional Protocol II of 1977, and incitement to genocide.

JEL Codes: K14, K19, K33, K41

Keywords: International Criminal Tribunal for Rwanda (ICTR), international criminal law, international court, international tribunal, international criminal court, genocide, international criminal procedure, non-international armed conflict, Additional Protocol II of 1977

 

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Suggested Citation:

Robert D. Sloane, "The International Criminal Tribunal for Rwanda," The Rules, Practice, and Jurisprudence of International Courts and Tribunals, Chapter 9 (Chiara Giorgetti ed., Brill, forthcoming)

Robert D. Sloane Contact Information

Boston University School of Law
765 Commonwealth Avenue
Boston, MA 02215

rdsloane@bu.edu

Phone: (617) 358-4633

Fax: (617) 353-3077

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