The Trial Advocacy Program at Boston University introduces students to the structure of the trial process and gives them personal training in the skills needed by trial lawyers. Small sections are taught by some of the leading judges and practitioners in New England who use simulated cases to teach students the realities of the courtroom. At the end of the semester, each student performs as counsel in a simulated trial. Instructors are given discretion, but most sections cover opening statements and closing arguments, the preparation of witnesses, developing a theory of the case, objections, introduction of real and documentary evidence and expert witnesses, as well as direct and cross-examination.

Courses

3 credits

This course introduces the student to the structure of the trial process and the skills used by trial lawyers. The topics covered range from opening statements to closing arguments, including conducting direct and cross-examination of witnesses, making and meeting objections, introducing documents and discovery into evidence, and using hypothetical questions with expert witnesses. Students must perform simulated exercises and will try one or more civil or criminal cases before a jury. Visit the web for more information on the instructors. PREREQUISITE: EVIDENCE. Students taking TRIAL ADVOCACY in the second semester of their third year may take EVIDENCE as a COREQUISITE. Students who have taken a trial advocacy course as part of a clinic may not subsequently enroll in Trial Advocacy. ENROLLMENT LIMIT: 12 students. GRADING NOTICE: This course does not offer the CR/NC/H option. NOTE: This course counts toward the 6 credit Experiential Learning requirement. ** A student who fails either to attend the initial meeting of a section of Trial Advocacy, or to obtain permission to be absent from either the instructor or the registrar, WILL BE administratively dropped from the section. Students who are on a wait list for a section are required to attend the first section meeting to be considered for enrollment.

FALL 2018: LAW JD 894 A1 , Sep 10th to Dec 3rd 2018
Days Start End Credits Instructors Bldg
Wed 6:00 pm 8:50 pm 3 Angel Kelley Brown
SPRG 2019: LAW JD 894 A2 , Jan 16th to Apr 24th 2019
Days Start End Credits Instructors Bldg
Wed 4:30 pm 7:20 pm 3 F. Dennis Saylor
SPRG 2019: LAW JD 894 W1 , Jan 15th to Apr 23rd 2019
Days Start End Credits Instructors Bldg
Tue 5:00 pm 7:50 pm 3 Fred Wyshak

3 credits

The purpose of this course is to enable students to further develop the skills acquired during the basic trial advocacy course and to introduce them to issues that are not generally addressed at the basic level. Those issues will include motions in limine, impaneling a jury, trial notebooks, effective use of experts, trial technology, preserving the record for appellate purposes and further developing direct and cross-examinations skills. This will be accomplished by using the entire case file used by counsel in a 1992 murder trial, Commonwealth v Fuller in Essex County, MA. The class will be divided into two teams: a prosecution team and a defense team. The case is evenly weighted so no team will have a built-in advantage. Each team will work together to address the issues facing that team. There will be plenty of opportunity for individual in-class demonstrations of various trial skills, including writing and arguing motions in limine, direct and cross examinations of an expert, etc. The students will learn that much of trial advocacy involves "brainstorming" the issues with one's peers, particularly during the early stages of a case. Accordingly, the course will be frontloaded with group discussion of the various issues facing the trial lawyer before the first juror is impaneled. The final exam of this course will be a mock trial of a case, one that is much more compact than the Fuller case. This trial will provide an excellent opportunity for the students to demonstrate the complete range of their trial skills. GRADING NOTICE: This course does not offer the CR/NC/H option. NOTE: This course counts toward the 6 credit Experiential Learning requirement. *** A student who fails either to attend the initial meeting of Trial Advocacy (Advanced), or to obtain permission to be absent from either the instructor or the registrar, will be administratively dropped from the section. Students who are on a wait list for a section are required to attend the first section meeting to be considered for enrollment.

SPRG 2019: LAW JD 945 A1 , Jan 17th to Apr 18th 2019
Days Start End Credits Instructors Bldg
Thu 4:30 pm 7:20 pm 3 Elizabeth M. Fahey

Instructors