Deep connectivity:
Professor Stacey Dogan and Mark Goracke ('12) on thought leadership for the digital age

Professor Stacey Dogan

Professor Stacey Dogan

Tiffany v. eBay. Metro-Goldwin-Mayer v. Grokster. In the ever-expanding universe of the Internet, new copyright and trademark issues arise at the speed of light. To master the field, you need to know the network but also have the network. And that's what gives BU Law Alumni Scholar and Professor of Law Stacey Dogan and her students the edge.

Dogan is one of the nation's leading experts on intellectual property and the Internet, and her network extends into the hotbeds of IP activity.Between co-editing the Journal of Copyright Law, chairing the Intellectual Property Section of the American Association of Law Schools and practicing for years in Washington, D.C. and San Francisco, I have strong relations with colleagues whose scholarship and advocacy confront fascinating questions about how intellectual property laws should adapt to new technologies, especially the Internet, Dogan says. I really enjoy bringing their multiple perspectives to the classroom.

I'm thrilled to be part of what I view as one of the best intellectual property programs in the country. The depth and breadth of BU Law's IP faculty make it an exciting place to teach and to learn.

Dogan's scholarship and relationships create a wide range of opportunities for her students. Just ask Mark Goracke ('12). He chose BU Law on the strength of its intellectual property faculty, and Dogan has been a key resource throughout his law school career. Professor Dogan's Intellectual Property Law course was one of my first 2L electives, says Goracke, and it reaffirmed that I'd come to the right place to prepare for IP practice.

The network that keeps on giving

Goracke also benefited from Dogan's expertise when she hired him as a research assistant during his first summer. It was a joint project with Professor Wendy Gordon, he explains. I worked with a small group of research assistants investigating how functionality relates to trademark protection. Essentially, our job was to explain our findings to two of the brightest people in IP. Although Gordon, like Dogan, is one of the country's thought leaders on IP law—her scholarship has been cited in three opinions of the U.S. Supreme Court—Goracke never felt intimidated. It was a trial by fire, but they gave us so much positive reinforcement that I felt more like a junior colleague than a first-year law student.

During his second year, Goracke took another elective from Dogan, Unfair Competition & Trademark, and he's slated for her Intellectual Property & the Internet class in his final semester. Goracke also tapped Dogan's network to land an internship at Volunteer Lawyers for the Arts (VLA). The VLA connection led, in turn, to two summer jobs in intellectual property–one with the Law Office of Zick Rubin and a second with New Leaf Legal. New Leaf was the perfect opportunity for me, says Goracke. The firm helps startups with a variety of IP issues, including registering copyrights and trademarks. With Professor Dogan's courses under my belt, I was able to make a substantive contribution to the practice.

Dogan's commitment to her students is matched by her enthusiasm for the BU Law community. I'm thrilled to be part of what I view as one of the best intellectual property programs in the country, she says. The depth and breadth of BU Law's IP faculty make it an exciting place to teach and to learn.

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