Academic Programs

Requirements

The Concentration in International Law recognizes the growing globalization of the practice of law. Virtually all fields of law have been influenced by this trend: international and foreign law rules often affect U.S. policy, legislation, and the claims of litigants in U.S. courts and elsewhere. As U.S. lawyers transact business and litigate across borders, they increasingly find it valuable to possess the knowledge and skills required to use international and foreign law to further the commercial, intellectual property, human rights, and other interests of their clients. Lawyers in the twenty-first century also increasingly need, or find it advantageous, to resort to international, regional, or foreign courts, arbitral tribunals, and other transnational dispute-settlement procedures.

Once students have decided to pursue a concentration, they should complete an Online Intent to Concentrate Form (also available in the Registrar’s Office). In the final semester, students will receive a Concentration Completion Form from the Registrar’s Office to show the course work and written work that satisfies the concentration requirements.

Program Requirements

A student may be certified as having completed the Concentration in International Law by meeting the following requirements:

  1. Satisfactory completion of International Law (JD927) and International Business Transactions (JD842).

  2. Satisfactory completion of substantial written work on an international, foreign, or comparative law topic. This requirement can be satisfied by the same written work that satisfies the School of Law’s upper-class writing (certification) requirement or by written work that satisfies the requirements of a course or seminar for which credit is given towards the concentration. With the approval of one of the concentration advisers, this requirement may also be satisfied by written work completed in a context other than a course or seminar for which credit is given towards the concentration. If the candidate student wrote the paper for a course or seminar other than the foregoing, or for another purpose, or if the supervising professor is an adjunct (part-time) faculty member, then a faculty concentration advisor must review the paper and confirm that it satisfies the concentration paper requirement.

  3. Satisfactory completion of of a minimum of five (5) additional courses from the following courses and seminars in international, foreign, and comparative law, as well as, to a limited extent, graduate-level courses in international, foreign, or comparative law (see paragraph 4 below). This list may be updated periodically to reflect changes in course offerings*. At least three (3) of the remaining courses must come from the following Law School courses or seminars in international, foreign or comparative law.

    African Legal Studies*
    Chinese Law for US Lawyers*
    Comparative Law (S)
    Comparative Family Law (S)*
    Comparative Constitutional Law (S)*
    The Constitution and Foreign Affairs (S)*
    English Legal History
    European Legal History*
    European Union Law
    European Financial Law (S)*
    EU VAT*
    Global Climate Change (S)
    Globalization of the Legal Profession (S)*
    Health Law, Bioethics, and Human Rights (S)*
    Immigration Law
    Inbound International Tax
    International Banking Structure*
    International Business Agreements (S)
    International Business Arbitration (S)
    International Business Transactions
    International and Comparative Legal Research (S)
    International Criminal Law (S)*
    International Development and Project Finance (S)
    International Economic Institutions*
    International Estate Planning
    International Human Rights (S)
    International Human Rights Clinic
    International Intellectual Property (S)
    International Law & the International Economy (S)*
    International Securities Transactions
    International Tax (S)
    International Trade Regulation
    Introduction to Project Finance
    Islamic Law (S)*
    Jewish Law (S)*
    Law & Development (S)*
    Law & Ethics of War (S)
    Micro Finance and Development
    Military Law (S)*
    National Security & Foreign Relations Law (S)*
    Refugee and Asylum Law (S)*
    Restorative Justice
    Space Law (S)*
    Tax Aspects of International Banking*
    Transnational Criminal Law*
    Transnational Litigation*
    Transnational Lending
    Independent Study in International, Foreign or Comparative Law**

  4. * The School of Law may not offer all of the enumerated courses every academic year, although it offers most regularly. Some of these courses are offered through the Graduate Banking and Financial Program, the Graduate Tax Program. Consequently, please note that subject to availability, students wishing to take courses offered by either (a) the Graduate Banking and Financial Program or (b) the Graduate Tax Program must obtain permission from and register through these respective programs. 
    ** In order for the Independent Study to qualify as one of the required courses , the Independent Study topic must be approved in advance in consultation with one of the Concentration Faculty Advisors.

  5. Students who wish to receive concentration credit for course offerings not listed above in satisfaction of any of the above requirements may do so with the approval of one of the faculty concentration advisers. Approval for course offerings taken outside of the Law School is limited to graduate-level courses in international, foreign, or comparative law. Such courses may include those taken in the dual degree program with the Department of International Relations, courses taken in one of the Law School’s overseas program, and courses taken at other law schools, in other graduate programs at Boston University, or elsewhere. A maximum of two course offerings may be approved for any student under the provisions of this paragraph

    To ensure maximum flexibility for students in their future career decisions, transcripts of students who elect the Concentration in International Law will not reflect the concentration. Rather, the BU Law Registrar's Office will record completion of the concentration and the award of honors in the concentration and will make available official documentation of these accomplishments at the student's request.

  6. Students who receive at least a 3.5 grade point average in School of Law course offerings taken to satisfy the requirements of the concentration will be awarded Honors in the Concentration in International Law. To be eligible for Honors, a minimum of five concentration courses comprising at least 15 credit hours must be in Law School course offerings. In accordance with the Law School’s regulations, only Law School courses will be included in calculating a student’s grade point average, and only such courses will be used to determine whether a student has earned Honors.

  7. The transcripts of students who elect to complete the Concentration in International Law will not reflect the concentration. Rather, the School of Law’s Registrar’s Office will record completion of the concentration and, if relevant, the award of Honors in the Concentration, and will make available official documentation of these accomplishments at the student’s request.

  8. Once students have decided to pursue the Concentration in International Law, they should complete an Online Intent to Concentrate Form (also available in the Registrar’s Office). In the final semester, students will receive a Concentration Completion Form from the Registrar’s Office to show the course work and written work that satisfies the concentration requirements.