Housing, Real Estate & Land Use Courses

This area of law covers land use, housing, and commercial real estate, as well as the environmental and tax implications of various types of real estate development. These courses and clinics focus on laws addressing landlord/tenant rights and responsibilities, real estate transactions, affordable housing, and community development. Please note that some courses are not offered every year.

Housing Law Courses

3 credits

The seminar will combine a focus on: 1) public policy issues related to the goals of creation of affordable housing in the context of community revitalization; and 2) real-world implementation strategies that have been successfully used to achieve these goals. Analyzing the roles of government agencies, non-profit organizations, neighborhood groups, and private businesses will be a key part of the seminar. In lieu of a traditional exam or term paper, students will engage in field research and investigation of real community projects as part of semester long case studies, where they will work with lawyers, government officials, developers and grass-roots advocates involved with the projects. The relative utility of traditional legal techniques (such as land use planning devices, zoning, easements, revolving trusts, leasehold covenants and financing) will be carefully analyzed; the policies and impact of federal, state and local laws, including federal and state affordable housing financing programs and the Community Preservation Act in Massachusetts, will be examined; and possible new approaches will be considered. By incorporating real-world projects into the seminar, it is hoped that the interface of law, economics, planning, design, and construction disciplines will enable the problems to be analyzed from a variety of perspectives reflecting a client's and a community's practical concerns. LIMITED WRITING REQUIREMENT OPTION: A limited number of students may be permitted to satisfy the upper-class writing requirement with the approval of the Associate Dean for Academic Affairs. ** A student who fails to attend the initial meeting of a seminar (designated by an (S) in the title), or to obtain permission to be absent from either the instructor or the Registrar, may be administratively dropped from the seminar. Students who are on a wait list for a seminar are required to attend the first seminar meeting to be considered for enrollment.

FALL 2018: LAW JD 935 A1 , Sep 10th to Dec 3rd 2018
Days Start End Credits Instructors Bldg
Mon 10:40 am 12:40 pm 3 Peter L. Freeman

3 credits

THIS CLASS IS RESTRICTED to students who have formally applied to and been accepted to the Civil Litigation Program. Student in the Civil Litigation Program handle their own case loads, representing indigent clients in civil cases under the supervision of clinical faculty. Students may participate in the Program for either a full year (the Housing, Employment, Family and Disability Clinic (HEFD)) or for one semester (the Employment Rights Clinic (ERC)). Students participating in the HEFD Clinic work on cases in areas such as domestic relations, eviction defense, employment law and Social Security appeals. Students in the ERC represent clients in unemployment compensation cases, with a possibility of working on wage and hour disputes, discrimination/sexual harassment cases, and Family Medical Leave Act cases. PRE/CO-REQUISITES: Evidence. NOTE: The Civil Litigation Program counts towards the 6 credit Experiential Learning requirement. GRADING NOTICE: This course does not offer the CR/NC/H option.

FALL 2018: LAW JD 861 A1 , Sep 4th to Dec 6th 2018
Days Start End Credits Instructors Bldg
ARR TBD TBD 3 Robert G. BurdickConstance A. Browne
FALL 2018: LAW JD 861 B1 , Sep 4th to Dec 6th 2018
Days Start End Credits Instructors Bldg
ARR TBD TBD 3 Robert G. BurdickConstance A. Browne
SPRG 2019: LAW JD 861 A1 , Jan 14th to Apr 24th 2019
Days Start End Credits Instructors Bldg
ARR TBD TBD 3 Robert G. BurdickConstance A. Browne
SPRG 2019: LAW JD 861 B2 , Jan 14th to Apr 24th 2019
Days Start End Credits Instructors Bldg
ARR TBD TBD 3 Robert G. BurdickConstance A. Browne

3 credits

Over the last sixty years housing law has evolved in a number of significant ways. Where once a lease was primarily considered to involve a transfer of an interest in land, it is now considered to involve a relationship framed by contract principles. Consistent with this change, tort law involving rental property is moving from a traditional negligence standard to a more complex standard based upon a duty derived from the implied warranty of habitability. Courts must now determine whether landlords should be held strictly liable in tort for personal injury claims based on defective conditions, inadequate security, lead poisoning, etc. Where formerly a landlord had significant discretion over tenant selection and tenancy termination, a variety of state housing laws and federal/state anti-discrimination laws now place significant limits on the landlord's power and control over these tenancy relationships. Public housing and governmentally subsidized housing has generated much heated debate as well as litigation over such issues as development-based policing authority and the right to evict entire families based upon criminal conduct of one family member. Finally, during the past four years complex title, tenancy, consumer rights and community preservation issues have arisen in the wake of the foreclosure crisis that has swept the nation. This seminar will focus on the various legal, social policy, and practical issues emerging with respect to traditional tenancies, premises liability, public safety in public and subsidized housing, housing discrimination, environmental protection, and control of foreclosed property. Student classroom participation and papers are required. LIMITED WRITING REQUIREMENT OPTION: A limited number of students may be permitted to satisfy the upper-class writing requirement with the approval of the Associate Dean for Academic Affairs. GRADING NOTICE: This course does not offer the CR/NC/H option. OFFERING PATTERN: This class is frequently offered in alternating years. Students are advised to take this into account when planning their long-term schedule. ** A student who fails to attend the initial meeting of a seminar, or to obtain permission to be absent from either the instructor or the Registrar, will be administratively dropped from the seminar. Students who waitlist for a seminar are required to attend the first seminar meeting to be considered for enrollment.

3 credits

The built environment around us is not inevitable or by accident. It is the outcome of a series of legal and political choices about how people should live together; about how to regulate and control the future use of the property around them. These choices result in a legal regime that, at once, is enormously complex, implicates the most basic questions of equity and constitutional freedoms, and affects people in every aspect of their daily lives. This course will examine land use from a legal, historical, theoretical, and, most important, practical perspective. Students will be introduced to a brief history of land use controls in the United States. The course will then cover the basic aspects of land use law: Euclidean zoning, special use permits, variances, vested rights and preexisting uses, exactions, exclusionary and inclusionary zoning, subdivision control, wetlands control, and legal challenges to zoning decisions. The course will also look at more recent trends and issues in land use law, such as smart growth and transit-oriented development, form-based zoning, marijuana regulations, short-term rentals, climate change resilience, and increased federal control of local land use. Finally, the course will examine the constitutional limits of land use regulation under the Fifth Amendment. Students will undertake practical exercises to introduce them to how land use lawyers practice. They will attend a zoning board hearing and report on it; they will analyze a client's proposal to determine what zoning relief is necessary; they will attend a zoning trial or appeal. The course will cover general zoning principles applicable nationally but will focus on Massachusetts law for the practical exercises. The class will require student participation in discussion. The only prerequisite is completion of first-year Property. Students will produce a brief paper on the zoning board meeting they attend and a final paper, and be asked to comment on the trial or hearing they attend. Grading will be based on class participation, the zoning exercise, the comments, and the two papers.

SPRG 2019: LAW JD 855 A1 , Jan 15th to Apr 23rd 2019
Days Start End Credits Instructors Bldg
Tue 6:30 pm 9:30 pm 3 Robert Foster

Real Estate & Land Use Courses

2 credits

This course will introduce students to the key concepts of construction law. The course takes students from pre-construction through project execution, and addresses the issues and conflicts that frequently arise during the construction process. Although portions of the course will address issues of contract law and dispute resolution, the course focuses on issues that are particular and unique to construction. GRADING NOTICE: This course does not offer the CR/NC/H option.

FALL 2018: LAW JD 716 A1 , Sep 4th to Dec 11th 2018
Days Start End Credits Instructors Bldg
Tue 10:40 am 12:40 pm 2 Kenneth Rubinstein

3 credits

Capital-intensive public and private development projects throughout the world, including large-scale infrastructure, transportation, energy, agriculture, technology and environmental projects depend upon project financing as the primary funding mechanism. Understanding and resolving the political, legal and financial risks associated with the planning and implementation of these projects, and often in emerging and unstable economies, is the critical first step in developing project finance opportunities. The seminar will combine theory and practice and focus on the negotiation and structure of actual project finance and concession agreements and transactions and the minimization of exposures and risks associated with these transactions. Each step of the project finance process will be analyzed, including the rationale and sources for the project finance, the legal framework for the project finance, the organizational and governance structure, risk allocation and mitigation and dispute resolution. An interdisciplinary analysis from the legal, finance and public perspective will be used to assess the views that investors, lenders, designers, contractors, governmental participants, citizens and other stakeholders bring to an infrastructure project. Several of the world's largest and most complex civil engineering and infrastructure mega projects including the English Chunnel, the Chad Cameroon Pipeline, the Dabhol Power Project and Boston's Central Artery Tunnel Project will serve as models for analysis of project finance and risk. A final research paper will be required in lieu of an examination. LIMITED WRITING REQUIREMENT OPTION: A limited number of students may be permitted to satisfy the upper-class writing requirement. GRADING NOTICE: This course does not offer the CR/NC/H option. **A student who fails to attend the initial meeting of a seminar (designated by an (S) in the title), or to obtain permission to be absent from either the instructor or the Registrar, may be administratively dropped from the seminar. Students who are on a wait list for a seminar are required to attend the first seminar meeting to be considered for enrollment.

SPRG 2019: LAW JD 936 A1 , Jan 14th to Apr 22nd 2019
Days Start End Credits Instructors Bldg
Mon 10:40 am 12:40 pm 3 Virginia Greiman

2 credits

This course focuses on the structure, documentation and negotiation of a typical project finance transaction. The class will explore legal, financial, and policy problems involved in investing in domestic and cross- border power and infrastructure projects. We will focus on strategies and techniques of structuring and financing such investments, and will touch upon the legal and regulatory environment for investment, and in the context of foreign investment, the role of political risk management and the implications of treaties, conventions, and other relevant law. Selected domestic and cross- border investment transactions, both actual and hypothetical, will be used to illustrate recurring issues. This course may contain a graded group drafting component where students draft and negotiate a loan agreement.

3 credits

The built environment around us is not inevitable or by accident. It is the outcome of a series of legal and political choices about how people should live together; about how to regulate and control the future use of the property around them. These choices result in a legal regime that, at once, is enormously complex, implicates the most basic questions of equity and constitutional freedoms, and affects people in every aspect of their daily lives. This course will examine land use from a legal, historical, theoretical, and, most important, practical perspective. Students will be introduced to a brief history of land use controls in the United States. The course will then cover the basic aspects of land use law: Euclidean zoning, special use permits, variances, vested rights and preexisting uses, exactions, exclusionary and inclusionary zoning, subdivision control, wetlands control, and legal challenges to zoning decisions. The course will also look at more recent trends and issues in land use law, such as smart growth and transit-oriented development, form-based zoning, marijuana regulations, short-term rentals, climate change resilience, and increased federal control of local land use. Finally, the course will examine the constitutional limits of land use regulation under the Fifth Amendment. Students will undertake practical exercises to introduce them to how land use lawyers practice. They will attend a zoning board hearing and report on it; they will analyze a client's proposal to determine what zoning relief is necessary; they will attend a zoning trial or appeal. The course will cover general zoning principles applicable nationally but will focus on Massachusetts law for the practical exercises. The class will require student participation in discussion. The only prerequisite is completion of first-year Property. Students will produce a brief paper on the zoning board meeting they attend and a final paper, and be asked to comment on the trial or hearing they attend. Grading will be based on class participation, the zoning exercise, the comments, and the two papers.

SPRG 2019: LAW JD 855 A1 , Jan 15th to Apr 23rd 2019
Days Start End Credits Instructors Bldg
Tue 6:30 pm 9:30 pm 3 Robert Foster

2 credits

This course provides an introduction to the field of microfinance, particularly its rapid evolution and role in economic development. Students will learn key concepts including the study of lending methodologies, products available to micro-entrepreneurs and the legal challenges, public policy considerations, and risks faced by investors, technical experts and financial providers. This course will also examine financial practices in the developing world such as payment and remittance systems, which allow foreign nationals to transfer funds internationally within and outside traditional banking systems.

Related Courses

3 credits

Climate change is the most important environmental issue of this century. It has generated major law and policy over the last several years, both in the United States and internationally, and presents significant legal and policy issues that remain unresolved. This seminar will examine the legal tools available to address climate change and possibilities for future action, as well as related challenges in light of the current political landscape. The seminar first will consider the international context and review the history of climate change efforts on a global scale, including the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change, the Kyoto Protocol, and the 2015 Paris Agreement. It will then focus on currently available U.S. authorities, including the Clean Air Act and executive branch powers, and on state and local efforts. Because there is no statute that addresses climate change head-on, the seminar will consider the challenges presented when a major policy concern is advanced in the absence of a firm statutory foundation. Climate change also raises important issues of human rights, environmental justice, and international and intergenerational equity, which will be examined. Finally, the seminar will look to the future and pose questions concerning expectations for international cooperation and possible developments in U.S. law and policy. There are no prerequisites. The grade will be based on class participation and papers. NOTE: This class does not satisfy the Upper Class writing requirement. GRADING NOTICE: This class will not offer the CR/NC/H option. ** A student who fails to attend the initial meeting of a seminar (designated by an (S) in the title), or to obtain permission to be absent from either the instructor or the Registrar, may be administratively dropped from the seminar. Students who are on a wait list for a seminar are required to attend the first seminar meeting to be considered for enrollment.

FALL 2018: LAW JD 796 A1 , Sep 5th to Dec 12th 2018
Days Start End Credits Instructors Bldg
Wed 4:20 pm 6:20 pm 3 Pamela A. Hill

3 credits

Energy law and policy are integral to the U.S. economy and have major impacts on the environment. This seminar will provide an overview of U.S. energy law and policy with an emphasis on the sources and regulation of electric energy. We will pay particular attention to emerging alternative energy sources, e.g. wind, solar, biomass, as well as new technologies, e.g. horizontal fracking for the development of natural gas. We will consider the division of regulatory authority among federal, state, and local governments. Students will have the opportunity to enhance their research, writing, and oral presentation skills and receive detailed feedback. There are no pre-requisites to the course other than a curious mind and interest in the subject matter. LIMITED WRITING REQUIREMENT: A limited number of students may elect to use this course to fulfill the upper-class writing requirement. GRADING NOTICE: This course does not offer the CR/NC/H option. ** A student who fails to attend the initial meeting of a seminar (designated by an (S) in the title), or to obtain permission to be absent from either the instructor or the Registrar, may be administratively dropped from the seminar. Students who are on a wait list for a seminar are required to attend the first seminar meeting to be considered for enrollment.

FALL 2018: LAW JD 832 A1 , Sep 5th to Dec 5th 2018
Days Start End Credits Instructors Bldg
Wed 2:10 pm 4:10 pm 3 Alan L. Feld

4 credits

This is an introductory survey course in environmental law. Topics include clean air, clean water, hazardous waste regulation and cleanup, and the protection of endangered species. Administrative Law is recommended but not required as a prerequisite.

FALL 2018: LAW JD 833 A1 , Sep 4th to Dec 5th 2018
Days Start End Credits Instructors Bldg
Tue,Wed 12:50 pm 2:00 pm 4 Jay D. Wexler
Fri 12:00 pm 1:20 pm 4 Jay D. Wexler

3 credits

The presence or absence of insurance is in many instances the single most important determinant of whether and how a tort or contracts action is litigated. This course focuses on both individual and commercial forms of insurance coverage. Students are introduced to the key insurance concepts of risk management, including the transfer, pooling and allocation of covered risks. Problems of contract interpretation, imperfect information, adverse selection and discrimination will be treated at length. Additionally, the class will take up issues particular to property, life, health, disability, liability and auto insurance. Finally, some time will be devoted to the state regulatory regimes designed to ensure solvency and profitability, and to the secondary market (i.e. reinsurance, and surplus and excess lines). A final exam is required.

SPRG 2019: LAW JD 850 A1 , Jan 15th to Apr 23rd 2019
Days Start End Credits Instructors Bldg
Tue,Thu 10:40 am 12:05 pm 3 Maria O’Brien Hylton

4 credits

The income tax is a pervasive feature of life in the United States and lawyers encounter tax issues in virtually every field of practice. This course introduces students to the fundamental principles of the federal income tax, and its impact on a wide range of matters, including employment, tort claims, divorce, retirement, and especially business activities and investments of all types. Topics include: the concept of income, determination of gross income, allowance of deductions and the determination of taxable income, identification of the taxpayer, taxable periods and timing, the determination of gain or loss (including realization and recognition) from dealings in property, the concept of income tax basis, and the process of change in the tax law. GRADING NOTICE: This course does not offer the CR/NC/H option.

FALL 2018: LAW JD 889 A1 , Sep 4th to Dec 6th 2018
Days Start End Credits Instructors Bldg
Tue,Thu 10:40 am 12:40 pm 4 Alan L. Feld
SPRG 2019: LAW JD 889 S1 , Jan 15th to Apr 23rd 2019
Days Start End Credits Instructors Bldg
Tue,Thu 9:00 am 10:30 am 4 Theodore S. Sims
Fri 9:00 am 10:20 am 4 Theodore S. Sims

2 credits

Local governments are considered the closest and most responsive form of government to the people. They are designed to create cities and towns that reflect the ideal of the residents' view of the ideal community. When all local government entities are taken into consideration, there are approximately 89,000 local government units in the country - including counties, municipalities, townships, special districts and school districts. Where do they get their powers? What are the limits? What should be the limits? This course provides a study of the law governing the powers and duties of local governments, mainly municipal corporations such as cities and towns. We look at the sources of municipal powers, the limits on those powers, the relationship between municipalities and the state including the relationship between state and local law, and the formation and expansion of municipalities. An important subject of study involves looking at various models of the relationship between the municipality and the state including home rule. We will also look at some issues in municipal finance and zoning power. Where possible, this course will focus on the intersection of local government law and important current events both locally and nationally. OFFERING PATTERN: This class is not offered every year. Students are advised to take this into account when planning their long-term schedule.

FALL 2018: LAW JD 800 A1 , Sep 10th to Dec 3rd 2018
Days Start End Credits Instructors Bldg
Mon 4:20 pm 6:20 pm 2 Robert A. DiAdamo

2 credits

This CLASS IS RESTRICTED to students who have received permission from the Clinical and Experiential Programs Office to enroll. This is the companion academic component for students enrolled in the Pro Bono Scholars Program: Fieldwork course. Students work with a faculty supervisor in designing their own reading list, writing a 15-20 page research paper, and submitting seven 4-6 page bi-weekly journals. COREQUISITE: NY Pro Bono Scholars Program: Fieldwork (JD 743).

SPRG 2019: LAW JD 744 A1 , Mar 4th to May 24th 2019
Days Start End Credits Instructors Bldg
ARR TBD TBD 2

10 credits

This CLASS IS RESTRICTED to students who have received permission from the Clinical and Experiential Programs Office to enroll. Through the Pro Bono Scholars Program, students spend their spring 3L semester working full-time for credit at a government agency or non-profit providing direct legal services to indigent clients. Participating students sit for the February New York bar exam, and begin their fieldwork the week after. Students passing the bar exam and completing other NY bar and BU Law graduation requirements are admitted to the NY bar in late-June. NOTE: Students who enroll in this program may count the credits toward the 6 credit Experiential Learning requirement. COREQUISITE: NY Pro Bono Scholars Program: Directed Study (JD 744).

SPRG 2019: LAW JD 743 A1 , Mar 4th to May 24th 2019
Days Start End Credits Instructors Bldg
ARR TBD TBD 10

3 credits

Public interest legal practice takes many forms. It can involve government agencies, non-profit organizations, private law firms doing pro bono work, public defender's office, labor unions, and inter-governmental organizations, among others. It can take the form of litigation, transactional work, policy-related work, or legislative advocacy. Also, attorneys adopt varied models of public interest lawyering, including approaches known as community lawyering, cause lawyering, and movement lawyering. This seminar engages through readings, guest speakers, and class discussion to examine the various approaches to public interest lawyering. Students will explore how to define the "public interest" and learn different models for public interest lawyering. Students also will gain familiarity with the different substantive areas of public interest law, organizational settings for public interest practice, and modes of public interest advocacy. Many class sessions will include a guest faculty member or a guest attorney who will present a sample of their public interest work in connection with class themes. There will also be time dedicated to discussing speaker presentations. Students will be required to submit short reaction papers to the readings and presentations and perform an in-class oral presentation based on class themes. NOTE: This class does not satisfy the upper-class writing requirement. GRADING NOTICE: This class does not offer the CR/NC/H option. ** A student who fails to attend the initial meeting of a seminar, or to obtain permission to be absent from either the instructor or the Registrar, will be administratively dropped from the seminar. Students who wait list for a seminar are required to attend the first seminar meeting to be considered for enrollment.

FALL 2018: LAW JD 875 A1 , Sep 6th to Dec 6th 2018
Days Start End Credits Instructors Bldg
Thu 4:20 pm 6:20 pm 3 Julie A. DahlstromCarolyn G. Goodwin

3 credits

This course is one of the semester-long transaction simulations offered as part of the School's Transactional Law Program and satisfies the Transaction Simulation requirement of the Transactional Practice Concentration. The simulated transaction involves the sale of an urban site in Cambridge, MA comprised of buildings currently or previously occupied by commercial tenants which is to be re-developed into a high-end mixed-use multi-family and retail building. The course is intended to expose students to various transactional, regulatory and other issues faced, and lawyering tasks undertaken, by both junior and more senior attorneys in this type of transaction, and to enable students, in performing these tasks, to develop important practice skills in the area of commercial real estate. The class will be divided into teams at various stages of the transaction, with each team representing the buyer or the seller, regarding the acquisition of the property, or the local developer or capital partner regarding forming the venture that will acquire this property. Students will perform the key analytical, drafting and other legal tasks required to effectively represent their respective clients during various stages of the transaction from inception through closing. Throughout the semester students will be able to interact with a variety of real estate developers and experts. The course grade will be based on periodic drafting, negotiating and other written assignments (both in-class and homework), contributions to team efforts, and individual class participation. CLASS SIZE: Limited to 12 students. NOTES: This course counts toward the 6 credit Experiential Learning requirement. The class will also satisfy the Transaction Simulation requirement of the Transactional Practice Concentration. GRADING NOTICE: This course does not offer the CR/NC/H option. ATTENDANCE REQUIREMENT: A student who fails to attend the first class or to obtain permission to be absent from either the instructor or the Registrar, will be administratively dropped from the class. Students who are on the wait list are required to attend the first meeting to be considered for enrollment.

SPRG 2019: LAW JD 774 A1 , Jan 16th to Apr 24th 2019
Days Start End Credits Instructors Bldg
Wed 4:20 pm 6:20 pm 3 Lawrence UchillRobert Fishman

3 credits

This course is one of the semester-long transaction simulations offered as part of the School's Transactional Law Program and satisfies the Transaction Simulation requirement of the Transactional Practice Concentration. The simulated transaction involves the consolidation of ownership of a family-owned retail drugstore company in a manner and through agreements that address the differing expectations and interests of the company's two shareholders: (i) the company's chief executive and majority owner seeking to obtain sole ownership of the business, including interests in real estate used in the business and (ii) his sister, a minority shareholder not active in the business, seeking a risk-free separation from the business and an assured pay-out. The course will consider the respective rights and obligations of these two shareholders as majority and minority owners in a closely held business. The course will also address issues involved in commercial real estate leasing and financing, including negotiating a commercial lease, mortgage and mortgage note from the perspective of each party. The course is intended to expose students to the principal tasks undertaken, and issues faced, by both junior and more senior attorneys in this type of transaction, and in doing so to build skills students will need as they enter transactional practice. The class will be divided into teams, with each team representing one of the participants in the transaction. Students will perform the key analytical, drafting and other legal tasks required to effectively represent their respective clients during various stages of the transaction from inception through closing. The course grade will be based on periodic drafting and other written assignments (individual and the individual's portion of team or group assignments), individual contributions to other team or group efforts, and individual class participation (including oral reports). CLASS SIZE: Limited to 12 students. NOTES: This course counts toward the 6 credit Experiential Learning requirement. The class will also satisfy the Transaction Simulation requirement of the Transactional Practice Concentration. GRADING NOTICE: This class will not offer the CR/NC/H option. ATTENDANCE REQUIREMENT: A student who fails to attend the first class or to obtain permission to be absent from either the instructor or the Registrar, will be administratively dropped from the class. Students who are on the wait list are required to attend the first meeting to be considered for enrollment.

FALL 2018: LAW JD 772 A1 , Sep 5th to Dec 5th 2018
Days Start End Credits Instructors Bldg
Wed 2:10 pm 4:10 pm 3 Richard BlanksteinRichard H. Goldman

LLM-Only Course

2 credits

This course exposes LL.M. students to the basic principles of real property law, including possession, ownership, rights in land, conveyances, estates, future interests, real estate contracts, easements, land use disputes, landlord-tenant issues, and land use controls, among others. The course is designed to provide a fundamental understanding of the essential doctrines of real property law for LL.M. students interested in taking a U.S. bar exam. Meeting dates - 1/17/2018-2/26/2018.

SPRG 2019: LAW JD 702 A1 , Jan 14th to Feb 27th 2019
Days Start End Credits Instructors Bldg
Mon,Wed 4:20 pm 6:20 pm 2 Gustavo Ribeiro