Banking & Financial Law Courses

The field of banking and finance covers corporate finance, lending, and compliance programs, as well as the regulation of financial institutions. Please note that some courses are not offered every year.

Foundational Courses

1 credits

Banking law has been at the epicenter of recent economic events and major reforms have been passed by Congress and now need to be implemented. Learn how to find laws and regulations, use specialized practice materials and search for agency issuances, among other research tasks. Lawyers practicing banking law often use licensed products other than LexisNexis, Westlaw and Bloomberg in their offices. Students will become familiar with these products in this class. Classes will combine instruction and hands-on exercises using major print, electronic, and web based resources for banking law research. Students will be required to complete an assignment for every class using electronic and print resources. NOTE: This seminar satisfies the Upper-class Professional Skills requirement. NOTE: Students may not add this course after the first class has been held. This course meets from 1/20/2016 to 2/24/2016.

2 credits

This course provides an introduction to and overview of the banking and financial services industry under US law and where US laws intersect with international banking supervision structures and principles. The course focuses on US banking structures and regulations, with an emphasis on the public or regulatory policies behind the laws and regulations. Recent US legislation in the Dodd-Frank Act and recent international reform initiatives such as Basel III receive close scrutiny. The course addresses a range of safety and soundness rules, permissible activity issues, chartering and merger activity procedures and capital and liquidity requirements. The course also addresses administrative procedures including bank examination and supervision, the regulatory supervisory process and bank enforcement actions. Students are asked to do significant reading and to participate in classroom discussion about course subject matter and to be aware of current developments in the financial services industry. This is a required course for all students studying for the degree of Master of Laws in Banking and Financial Law.

FALL 2017: LAW BK 925 A1 , Sep 6th to Dec 6th 2017
Days Start End Credits Instructors Bldg Room
Wed 4:20 pm 6:20 pm 2 James E. Scott LAW 605
FALL 2017: LAW BK 925 OL , Sep 5th to Dec 7th 2017
Days Start End Credits Instructors Bldg Room
ARR TBD TBD 2 James E. Scott

3 credits

This course will survey the regulatory architecture of major U.S. financial institutions, including commercial banks, investment banks, hedge funds, mutual funds, and insurance companies. Understanding the regulatory framework surrounding financial institutions requires situating them within a rapidly evolving political, technological and global context. The course will explore various regulatory mechanisms, such as bank supervision, security disclosures, fiduciary duties, consumer protections, capital requirements, and risk monitoring. The design of these complex governance tools has important implications for the health and stability of the economy, and thus for society. Attendance at the Graduate Program in Banking and Financial Law's three-day program, "Financial Services Basics," is highly recommended. PREREQUISITE: Business Fundamentals. GRADING NOTICE: This class does not offer the CR/NC/H option.

FALL 2017: LAW JD 864 A1 , Sep 5th to Dec 7th 2017
Days Start End Credits Instructors Bldg Room
Tue,Thu 4:20 pm 5:45 pm 3 Rory Van Loo LAW 410

Finance Courses

3 credits

This course covers the foundations of corporate finance. It starts with the concepts of time value of money, discounting, and present value. With that background it then considers the major financial decisions made by corporate managers. Topics include the valuation of financial assets and liabilities, criteria for making investment decisions, business valuation, relationships between risk and return, portfolio theory, market efficiency, capital structure choice, and cost of capital. GRADING NOTICE: Professor Sims' section will not offer the CR/NC/H option.

FALL 2017: LAW JD 985 A1 , Sep 6th to Dec 6th 2017
Days Start End Credits Instructors Bldg Room
Mon,Wed 9:00 am 10:30 am 3 Theodore S. Sims LAW 212
SPRG 2018: LAW JD 985 B1 , Jan 17th to Apr 25th 2018
Days Start End Credits Instructors Bldg Room
Mon,Wed 2:10 pm 3:40 pm 3 Kathryn Griner

2 credits

Assets being managed by hedge funds have grown significantly during the past 10 years. As a result, managers of hedge funds have been the focus of increased scrutiny by investors, the press and regulatory authorities. This course will cover the regulations (and exemptions) applicable to hedge funds and their managers, including under the Securities Act of 1933, the Investment Company Act and the Investment Advisers Act. We will focus on the formation and operation of U.S. and offshore hedge funds, including structure, disclosure, risks and economic and liquidity terms. This will include a detailed review of hedge fund offering documents. We will discuss the many issues being considered by hedge fund managers and regulators, including valuation, conflicts of interest, insider trading and compliance.

SPRG 2018: LAW BK 934 A1 , Jan 17th to Apr 25th 2018
Days Start End Credits Instructors Bldg Room
Wed 4:20 pm 6:20 pm 2 Miriam Gross

2 credits

Pooled investment funds, such as pension plans and mutual funds, are an important part of the global financial services industry. This course is designed as a survey of pooled funds and seeks to introduce students to the common regulatory themes that are found across pooled fund types, and to identify the unique approaches to regulation applicable to the various pooled fund types studied. The course undertakes an analysis of the legal, regulatory and fiduciary standards that apply to trustees, managers, advisers, and sponsors of collective investment vehicles. The course focuses on the concept of fiduciary duty as the basis of all trusted relationships, and examines selected problems of investor and beneficiary protection in the fields of private and public pension plans and mutual funds. It studies in detail two U.S. federal statutes as examples of legal techniques used to mitigate those risks--ERISA and the Investment Company Act of 1940 (including fiduciary duties, the role of the fund board and management fees). The class then studies pooled investment funds and investment trusts in the E.U., the U.K. and other countries, focusing on the perceived risks and protective measures reflected in their legal and regulatory systems. Not offered fall 2013.

SPRG 2018: LAW BK 950 A1 , Jan 16th to Apr 24th 2018
Days Start End Credits Instructors Bldg Room
Tue 6:30 pm 8:30 pm 2 Fross

3 credits

This seminar introduces students to the business and legal issues prevalent in private equity and venture capital deals and highlights the significant role that lawyers play in effecting these transactions. The seminar will begin with an overview of the private equity and venture capital industries, an introduction to investment transactions and will proceed through all aspects of the life of an investment from inception to exit. It will address how investment funds are formed and the legal and financial considerations present when those funds invest in private companies. We will examine deal terms and structures, pricing and corporate finance issues, and the management of deal risk. It will also highlight the due diligence process, stockholder relationships, fiduciary duties and securities laws considerations, and liquidity events. Theoretical readings will be balanced against practical articles and commentary, recent court decisions and model deal documents. The seminar will be highlighted by guest lectures by private equity and venture capital investment professionals. Grades will be based on a final exam, short pre-class exercises and class participation. PREREQUISITE: Corporations (May be waived with an instructor's permission.) NOTES: This seminar does not satisfy the Upper-class Writing Requirement. This seminar satisfies the Upper-class Professional Skills requirement. GRADING NOTICE: This course does not offer the CR/NC/H option. ** A student who fails to attend the initial meeting of a seminar (designated by an (S) in the title), or to obtain permission to be absent from either the instructor or the Registrar, may be administratively dropped from the seminar. Students who are on a wait list for a seminar are required to attend the first seminar meeting to be considered for enrollment.

SPRG 2018: LAW JD 931 A1 , Jan 16th to Apr 25th 2018
Days Start End Credits Instructors Bldg Room
Mon 6:30 pm 8:30 pm 3 Michael J. KendallWilliam D. Collins

2 credits

An overview of the federal income taxation of passthrough entities such as REITs, RICs, and REMICs. The taxation of partnerships and S corporations will also be examined to establish points of comparison. Topics include the integration of the federal corporate and individual income tax, and the various methods through which integration can be achieved. Prerequisites: Introduction to Corporate Tax and Partnership Tax I. Notes: Limited enrollment. Final paper.

Online section not open to JD students.

3 credits

Securitization is a process which converts illiquid financial assets (e.g., loans, receivables) into liquid and tradable financial assets (securities). After an overview of the financial system we follow the process: creating loans, transferring loans to an entity, choosing the entitle (form, possible regulation and tax considerations), distributing the entity's securities, and examining global-cross-border securities. Because the process touches on many legal areas (e.g., banking, securities regulation, regulation of investment companies, corporation, trusts, UCC, bankruptcy, contract, and fiduciary duties) the class offers a high level understanding of the process and awareness of the issues on which it touches, focusing on planning. Students are graded on 2 short papers (up to 10 double-spaced pages) offering problems in particular topics related to the materials. Papers should be completed after presentation in class. Teaching book: Tamar Frankel, Securitization (2006) (a treatise without the footnotes), with discussion topics and problems. NOTE: This course satisfies the Upper-class Professional Skills requirement.

International Law Courses

3 credits

This seminar will provide an overview of the private dimensions of negotiating and drafting international business agreements, and specifically on the contractual aspects. Students will gain hands on experience in structuring, drafting and analyzing various international business agreements and documents including global joint venture agreements and privatization provisions, sales, distribution and franchise agreements, international development agreements, share purchase agreements, letters of intent and technology licensing agreements. The design of the class will assist students in identifying critical legal issues and techniques likely to affect the outcome of international business negotiations including protecting against political, economic and legal risks. Emphasis will be placed on the important differences between international and domestic agreements from the American law perspective. Grades will be based on class participation and a final research paper. At the option of the student a final examination can be taken in lieu of a research paper. NOTE: This class may be used to satisfy the Professional Skills requirement or the upper-class writing requirement (limited). This class may not be used to satisfy more than one requirement. GRADING NOTICE: This course does not offer the CR/NC/H option. **A student who fails to attend the initial meeting of a seminar (designated by an (S) in the title), or to obtain permission to be absent from either the instructor or the Registrar, may be administratively dropped from the seminar. Students who are on a wait list for a seminar are required to attend the first seminar meeting to be considered for enrollment.

FALL 2017: LAW JD 959 A1 , Sep 11th to Dec 11th 2017
Days Start End Credits Instructors Bldg Room
Mon 10:40 am 12:40 pm 3 Virginia Greiman LAW 418

3 credits

Legal dimensions of resolution of cross-border economic disputes through binding arbitration. Treaty framework for determining validity of arbitration agreement and for recognition and enforcement of arbitral awards, in particular 1958 New York (UN) Convention and 1965 Washington (World Bank) Convention. Comparative approach, including reference to French, English, Swiss, and United States approaches to arbitration law, as well as the United States (UNCITRAL) Model Act. Investor-State proceedings pursuant to free trade agreements and bilateral investment treaties. Influence of major arbitration rules, including ICC, LCIA, AAA and ICSID. Exploration of special issues arising from intellectual property arbitration and expropriation claims, including Act of State and sovereign immunity. Introduction to debate on "delocalized" arbitration, the role of the arbitral seat and the enforceability of awards annulled at the place of proceedings. Arbitral awards as a contribution to lex mercatoria and the "soft law" of dispute resolution. Comparison of business arbitration with issues related to consumer, employment and class action proceedings in the United States. GRADING NOTICE: This course does not offer the CR/NC/H option. ** A student who fails to attend the initial meeting of a seminar, or to obtain permission to be absent from either the instructor or the Registrar, will be administratively dropped from the seminar. Students who wait list for a seminar are required to attend the first seminar meeting to be considered for enrollment.

FALL 2017: LAW JD 980 A1 , Sep 11th to Dec 4th 2017
Days Start End Credits Instructors Bldg Room
Mon 2:10 pm 4:10 pm 3 William W. Park LAW 418

3 credits

This course is designed to give students a broad overview of the law--domestic, foreign, and international--governing international business transactions. With the significant growth in international commerce and trade, and the forces of economic and social globalization, lawyers will increasingly confront international legal issues during their professional careers. This course will focus on the legal problems encountered in business ventures that cross national borders. Topics include formation of contracts, choice of law, financing the international sale of goods through letters of credit, regulation of international trade, the organizations and operations of the institutions of the World Trade Organization, foreign investment, international dispute settlement, and international transfer of intellectual property. GRADING NOTICE: This course does not offer the CR/NC/H option.

SPRG 2018: LAW JD 842 A1 , Jan 16th to Apr 24th 2018
Days Start End Credits Instructors Bldg Room
Tue,Thu 2:10 pm 3:35 pm 3 Rebecca Ingber

3 credits

Capital-intensive public and private development projects throughout the world, including large-scale infrastructure, transportation, energy, agriculture, technology and environmental projects depend upon project financing as the primary funding mechanism. Understanding and resolving the political, legal and financial risks associated with the planning and implementation of these projects, and often in emerging and unstable economies, is the critical first step in developing project finance opportunities. The seminar will combine theory and practice and focus on the negotiation and structure of actual project finance and concession agreements and transactions and the minimization of exposures and risks associated with these transactions. Each step of the project finance process will be analyzed, including the rationale and sources for the project finance, the legal framework for the project finance, the organizational and governance structure, risk allocation and mitigation and dispute resolution. An interdisciplinary analysis from the legal, finance and public perspective will be used to assess the views that investors, lenders, designers, contractors, governmental participants, citizens and other stakeholders bring to an infrastructure project. Several of the world's largest and most complex civil engineering and infrastructure mega projects including the English Chunnel, the Chad Cameroon Pipeline, the Dabhol Power Project and Boston's Central Artery Tunnel Project will serve as models for analysis of project finance and risk. A final research paper will be required in lieu of an examination. NOTE: This class may be used to satisfy the Professional Skills requirement or the upper-class writing requirement (limited). This class may not be used to satisfy more than one requirement. GRADING NOTICE: This course does not offer the CR/NC/H option. **A student who fails to attend the initial meeting of a seminar (designated by an (S) in the title), or to obtain permission to be absent from either the instructor or the Registrar, may be administratively dropped from the seminar. Students who are on a wait list for a seminar are required to attend the first seminar meeting to be considered for enrollment.

SPRG 2018: LAW JD 936 A1 , Jan 22nd to Apr 23rd 2018
Days Start End Credits Instructors Bldg Room
Mon 10:40 am 12:40 pm 3 Virginia Greiman

Regulatory Courses

2 credits

This course introduces lawyers to the economics of financial markets and institutions. Emphasis is placed on the interaction of commercial banks, the Federal Reserve System, and monetary policy. Other topics include the characteristics of financial instruments (such as Treasury securities, corporate stocks and bonds, and secondary market mortgage-backed securities), how they are priced in the market, the factors determining the level and shape of the Treasury yield curve, and the relationship between commercial banking and the growth of the over-the-counter derivatives market. Course grades will be based on midterm and final examinations, and on written assignments.

FALL 2017: LAW BK 983 A1 , Sep 6th to Dec 6th 2017
Days Start End Credits Instructors Bldg Room
Wed 6:30 pm 8:30 pm 2 Mark K. W. Gim LAW 605

4 credits

This course covers U.S. laws governing global trade and finance. We will examine the compliance obligations of multinational enterprises pursuant to U.S. export controls, sanctions, AML and terrorist-financing laws. Key focuses of the course will be the extraterritorial scope of U.S. laws, and techniques for mitigating legal risk in transnational business operations. Students will learn how to: 1. Identify and assess legal risk in transnational trade and financial operations; 2. Build compliance programs that effectively mitigate such risk; and, 3. Manage interactions between multinational enterprises and U.S. enforcement agencies.

SPRG 2018: LAW JD 918 A1 , Jan 16th to Apr 24th 2018
Days Start End Credits Instructors Bldg Room
Tue,Thu 2:10 pm 4:10 pm 4 Babak Boghraty

4 credits

An examination of case law, statutes, and regulations governing transactions entered into for personal or family purposes rather than business or professional ones. Topics include theories of consumer protection, advertising, disclosure requirements, credit reporting and access to credit, quality of goods and services, billing disputes, collection efforts, and methods of enforcing consumer rights. This course might be of both professional and personal interest.

2 credits

The Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (PPACA), better known as health care reform, is the most important and controversial piece of federal social legislation of this generation. It is also basically an insurance regulatory statute. PPACA establishes a new and complex set of rules governing the operation of the health insurance industry, provides consumers with important rights with respect to access to medical care and imposes obligations with respect to health insurance on both businesses and individuals. The course will look at PPACA and the issues that surrounded its enactment--issues which continue to fuel debate over whether it should modified or repealed. This will be done as part of an examination of the regulatory rules that govern all of insurance industry?s products (annuities, auto, home owners? product liability, life insurance, etc). The course also takes a look at the insurance industry?s structure and financial performance and at the competitive interactions between the insurance, banking and securities industries. The impact on the industry of the financial crisis of 2008 and the resulting Dodd-Frank reform legislation will be reviewed.

FALL 2017: LAW BK 990 A1 , Sep 11th to Dec 4th 2017
Days Start End Credits Instructors Bldg Room
Mon 2:10 pm 4:10 pm 2 Raymond A. Guenter LAW 508

3 credits

Understanding the laws governing consumer transactions is relevant not only to our daily lives but also to many careers in the law. Why do consumer laws matter for societal issues such as racial and income inequality? How can government agencies best promote compliance while minimizing burden to businesses? How should leaders of consumer corporations navigate a heavier regulatory era? This seminar will examine consumer laws from three main perspectives: the businesses that must comply with regulations; the agencies--such as the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau and the Federal Trade Commission--that write or enforce rules; and the consumers who purchase over $10 trillion in goods and services annually. PREREQUISITE: Business Fundamentals. RECOMMENDED COURSE: Antitrust. NOTE: This seminar does not satisfy the Upper-class Writing Requirement. GRADING NOTICE: This seminar does not offer the CR/NC/H option. **A student who fails to attend the initial meeting of a seminar (designated by an (S) in the title), or to obtain permission to be absent from either the instructor or the Registrar, may be administratively dropped from the seminar. Students who are on a wait list for a seminar are required to attend the first seminar meeting to be considered for enrollment.

SPRG 2018: LAW JD 904 A1 , Jan 16th to Apr 24th 2018
Days Start End Credits Instructors Bldg Room
Tue 4:20 pm 6:20 pm 3 Rory Van Loo

2 credits

Pooled investment funds, such as pension plans and mutual funds, are an important part of the global financial services industry. This course is designed as a survey of pooled funds and seeks to introduce students to the common regulatory themes that are found across pooled fund types, and to identify the unique approaches to regulation applicable to the various pooled fund types studied. The course undertakes an analysis of the legal, regulatory and fiduciary standards that apply to trustees, managers, advisers, and sponsors of collective investment vehicles. The course focuses on the concept of fiduciary duty as the basis of all trusted relationships, and examines selected problems of investor and beneficiary protection in the fields of private and public pension plans and mutual funds. It studies in detail two U.S. federal statutes as examples of legal techniques used to mitigate those risks--ERISA and the Investment Company Act of 1940 (including fiduciary duties, the role of the fund board and management fees). The class then studies pooled investment funds and investment trusts in the E.U., the U.K. and other countries, focusing on the perceived risks and protective measures reflected in their legal and regulatory systems. Not offered fall 2013.

SPRG 2018: LAW BK 950 A1 , Jan 16th to Apr 24th 2018
Days Start End Credits Instructors Bldg Room
Tue 6:30 pm 8:30 pm 2 Fross

4 credits

This course offers an introduction to federal securities regulation under the Securities Act of 1933 and the Securities Exchange Act of 1934. We will examine how the securities laws shape the process by which companies raise capital through IPOs, public offerings, and private placements. We will also focus on the mandatory disclosure regime for publicly traded companies and the related topics of securities fraud, insider trading, market manipulation, and shareholder voting. We will study core concepts such as the definition of a security and materiality. Finally, we will spend significant time examining the role of the SEC and private shareholder litigation in policing the securities laws. PREREQUISITE/COREQUISITE: Business Fundamentals is a prerequisite; Corporations is a corequisite. GRADING NOTICE: This course does not offer the CR/NC/H option.

SPRG 2018: LAW JD 883 A1 , Jan 16th to Apr 24th 2018
Days Start End Credits Instructors Bldg Room
Tue,Thu 10:40 am 12:40 pm 4 David H. Webber

Related Courses

1 credits

Banking law has been at the epicenter of recent economic events and major reforms have been passed by Congress and now need to be implemented. Learn how to find laws and regulations, use specialized practice materials and search for agency issuances, among other research tasks. Lawyers practicing banking law often use licensed products other than LexisNexis, Westlaw and Bloomberg in their offices. Students will become familiar with these products in this class. Classes will combine instruction and hands-on exercises using major print, electronic, and web based resources for banking law research. Students will be required to complete an assignment for every class using electronic and print resources. NOTE: This seminar satisfies the Upper-class Professional Skills requirement. NOTE: Students may not add this course after the first class has been held. This course meets from 1/20/2016 to 2/24/2016.

4 credits

This course focuses on corporate reorganization and corporate finance. We will study the legal requirements for reorganization plans under Chapter 11 of the Bankruptcy Code, as well as the use of going concern sales outside of Chapter 11. We will study important doctrinal issues relating to reorganization of corporate groups, including substantive consolidation and equitable subordination. We will investigate avoidance actions in bankruptcy, including preferences and fraudulent conveyance, and the treatment of pre-bankruptcy contracts. Other topics include the financing of corporate debtors in bankruptcy and workouts and duties to creditors outside of bankruptcy. Finally, we will also introduce and ultimately master some basic tools of corporate finance--present value, expected value, and risk and diversification. GRADING NOTICE: This class will not offer the CR/NC/H option. PREREQUISITE: Business Fundamentals. PREREQUISITE/COREQUISITE: Corporations.

SPRG 2018: LAW JD 803 A1 , Jan 17th to Apr 25th 2018
Days Start End Credits Instructors Bldg Room
Mon,Wed 8:30 am 10:30 am 4 Frederick Tung

3 credits

This seminar will examine Chapter 11 from the point of view of attorneys for all participants in the process. It is designed to provide the student with knowledge of the uses of Chapter 11, the parties involved in a Chapter 11 proceeding, the substantive law governing Chapter 11 and the Plan of Reorganization process. This seminar will explore the increasing use of Chapter 11 as a vehicle to accomplish the sale of insolvent businesses, the "cram down" of creditors to accomplish confirmation of Plans of Reorganization, executory contracts including those dealing with real estate, equipment and intellectual property and alternatives to Chapter 11. Also to be considered are the impact of changes in judicial, legislative and societal attitudes on the restructuring process. The material will consist of important cases and articles on the subjects to be discussed. Grades will depend primarily on one (1) research paper which will be required of each student. Grades will be adjusted to account for class participation. NOTES: This seminar does not satisfy the Upper-class Writing Requirement. This seminar satisfies the Professional Skills requirement. ** A student who fails to attend the initial meeting of a seminar (designated by an (S) in the title), or to obtain permission to be absent from either the instructor or the Registrar, may be administratively dropped from the seminar. Students who are on a wait list for a seminar are required to attend the first seminar meeting to be considered for enrollment.

3 credits

This seminar deals with compliance mechanisms within large financial organizations. Compliance includes observing the law and following internal rules within the institution. The purpose of the class is to offer a fundamental preparation to the lawyer in a large financial institution's Legal Department or a separate Compliance Department. This seminar covers the following: * The history of compliance within United States and global financial services companies; * The interaction between business processes and compliance processes; and, in some respects, the law and its enforcement within organizations; * The profession of compliance: The roles of the Chief Ethics & Compliance Officer, The Auditor; the Legal Officer and the interaction among them * Defining best practice, business process, risk assessment and controls and their interactions within the global financial service company; * A broad outline of regulations applicable to global financial services companies; the respective roles of corporate governance functions, such as: finance, internal audit, independent auditors, legal, compliance, and ethics departments, and risk management, and international issues. * Asset management: an overview of the regulation of broker dealers, insurance, and banking. * Interacting with regulators, and investigations * Business ethics and culture in large organizations. The reading materials for the seminar are prepared by Professor Lee D. Augsburger (Chief Compliance Officer of Prudential Insurance Company) and Professor Tamar Frankel. ** A student who fails to attend the initial meeting of a seminar, or to obtain permission to be absent from either the instructor or the Registrar, will be administratively dropped from the seminar. Students who waitlist for a seminar are required to attend the first seminar meeting to be considered for enrollment.

FALL 2017: LAW JD 769 A1 , Sep 5th to Dec 5th 2017
Days Start End Credits Instructors Bldg Room
Tue 8:30 am 10:30 am 3 Tamar Frankel LAW 203

2 credits

The course is a survey of the key areas of compliance. The course will examine implementing and maintaining a compliance program. Topic areas to be covered include: U.S. Foreign Corrupt Practices Act; the Office of Foreign Assets Control; Bank Secrecy Act; Privacy; Investigations; Whistleblower Rates; Information Reporting/Disclosure; Insider Trading Policies; Code of Ethics; Audit; Conflict of Interest; Management Reporting; Internal Reporting/E- Discovery/Record Retention.

FALL 2017: LAW BK 931 A1 , Sep 7th to Dec 7th 2017
Days Start End Credits Instructors Bldg Room
Thu 4:20 pm 6:20 pm 2 Stephen Cesso LAW 605

3 credits

This course is the foundational skills course within the Transactional Law Program. It teaches students basic principles and skills of drafting and analyzing commercial and transaction agreements, with a focus on recognizing, and addressing through contractual provisions, key business issues in transactions. Although the course will be of particular interest to students interested in a corporate or transactional law practice, since most practicing attorneys will need to work with contracts at some point in their career, the concepts and skills which the course conveys are applicable to virtually all practice areas and specialties. While the course utilizes lectures to introduce various contract concepts and techniques essential for drafting and reviewing commercial and transaction agreements, it requires that students complete in-class exercises and extensive homework assignments as a means of building basic drafting skills and a solid understanding of the structure and operation of contractual provisions in a business transaction. Grades will be based on the graded assignments, good faith completion of ungraded assignments, and class participation. ENROLLMENT LIMIT: 12 students. NOTE: This class satisfies the upper-class Professional Skills requirement and counts toward the 6 credit Experiential Learning requirement. GRADING NOTICE: This class will not offer the CR/NC/H option. ATTENDANCE REQUIREMENT: A student who fails to attend the first class or to obtain permission to be absent from either the instructor or the Registrar, will be administratively dropped from the class. Students who are on the wait list for a section are required to attend the first meeting to be considered for enrollment.

FALL 2017: LAW JD 788 A1 , Sep 11th to Dec 4th 2017
Days Start End Credits Instructors Bldg Room
Mon 4:20 pm 6:20 pm 3 Jonathan Guest LAW 702
FALL 2017: LAW JD 788 B1 , Sep 11th to Dec 4th 2017
Days Start End Credits Instructors Bldg Room
Mon 4:20 pm 6:20 pm 3 Emmy Hessler LAW 419
FALL 2017: LAW JD 788 C1 , Sep 6th to Dec 6th 2017
Days Start End Credits Instructors Bldg Room
Wed 4:20 pm 6:20 pm 3 Thomas P. Harrison LAW 519
FALL 2017: LAW JD 788 D1 , Sep 6th to Dec 6th 2017
Days Start End Credits Instructors Bldg Room
Wed 6:30 pm 8:30 pm 3 Carla Moynihan LAW 518
FALL 2017: LAW JD 788 E1 , Sep 7th to Dec 7th 2017
Days Start End Credits Instructors Bldg Room
Thu 4:20 pm 6:20 pm 3 Young M. Park LAW 416
FALL 2017: LAW JD 788 F1 , Sep 7th to Dec 7th 2017
Days Start End Credits Instructors Bldg Room
Thu 6:30 pm 8:30 pm 3 Robert M. Schlein LAW 519
SPRG 2018: LAW JD 788 A2 , Jan 16th to Apr 24th 2018
Days Start End Credits Instructors Bldg Room
Tue 4:20 pm 6:20 pm 3 Carla Moynihan
SPRG 2018: LAW JD 788 B2 , Jan 16th to Apr 24th 2018
Days Start End Credits Instructors Bldg Room
Tue 6:30 pm 8:30 pm 3 John F. Cohan
SPRG 2018: LAW JD 788 C2 , Jan 17th to Apr 25th 2018
Days Start End Credits Instructors Bldg Room
Wed 6:30 pm 8:30 pm 3 Neal S. Winneg
SPRG 2018: LAW JD 788 D2 , Jan 18th to Apr 19th 2018
Days Start End Credits Instructors Bldg Room
Thu 10:40 am 12:40 pm 3 Cecily Banks

Var credits

This CLASS IS RESTRICTED to students who have received permission from the Office of Experiential Education to enroll. This is the companion fieldwork component for students enrolled in the Corporate Counsel Externship: Seminar. Students will work at legal offices of corporations in unpaid or paid placements. Students will receive 3-9 variable P/F credits for working at their placements. Each credit requires 50 hours of work over the course of the 13-week semester (averaging 4 hours per week). NOTE: Students who enroll in this externship may count the credits towards the 6 credit Experiential Learning requirement.

FALL 2017: LAW JD 954 A1 , Sep 5th to Dec 7th 2017
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FALL 2017: LAW JD 954 A2 , Sep 5th to Dec 7th 2017
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FALL 2017: LAW JD 954 A3 , Sep 5th to Dec 7th 2017
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FALL 2017: LAW JD 954 A4 , Sep 5th to Dec 7th 2017
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FALL 2017: LAW JD 954 A5 , Sep 5th to Dec 7th 2017
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FALL 2017: LAW JD 954 A6 , Sep 5th to Dec 7th 2017
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FALL 2017: LAW JD 954 A7 , Sep 5th to Dec 7th 2017
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SPRG 2018: LAW JD 954 A1 , Jan 16th to Apr 25th 2018
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SPRG 2018: LAW JD 954 A2 , Jan 16th to Apr 25th 2018
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SPRG 2018: LAW JD 954 A3 , Jan 16th to Apr 25th 2018
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SPRG 2018: LAW JD 954 A4 , Jan 16th to Apr 25th 2018
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SPRG 2018: LAW JD 954 A5 , Jan 16th to Apr 25th 2018
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SPRG 2018: LAW JD 954 A6 , Jan 16th to Apr 25th 2018
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SPRG 2018: LAW JD 954 A7 , Jan 16th to Apr 25th 2018
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ARR TBD TBD Var

2 credits

This CLASS IS RESTRICTED to students who have received permission from the Office of Experiential Education to enroll. This is a 2-credit graded seminar for those students doing fieldwork in Corporate Counsel offices that meets every week for 1.5 hours. The seminar will cover a range of topics and competencies essential to legal practice in the corporate counsel offices of corporations, such as the modern role of in-house counsel; representing and becoming a trusted advisor to the internal corporate client; upholding confidentiality and ethical standards; learning the client's business; communicating effectively in a business setting; collaborating with others; and solving problems to further the client's strategic objectives. To maximize the students' growth over the semester, the seminar will also teach students how lawyers learn from practice, build strong supervisory relationships, reflect and self-assess, and set and measure progress on professional development goals. Students will write reflective papers, make oral presentations, and complete other work as required by the instructor. NOTE: Students who enroll in this externship may count the credits towards the 6 credit Experiential Learning requirement.

FALL 2017: LAW JD 896 A1 , Sep 5th to Dec 5th 2017
Days Start End Credits Instructors Bldg Room
Tue 4:30 pm 6:00 pm 2 Cecily Banks LAW 417
SPRG 2018: LAW JD 896 B1 , Jan 16th to Apr 24th 2018
Days Start End Credits Instructors Bldg Room
Tue 4:30 pm 6:00 pm 2 Cecily Banks

4 credits

Marks, Tung and Walker: Course about the legal structure and characteristics of business corporations. Topics include the promotion and formation of corporations; the distribution of power between management and shareholders; the limitations on management powers imposed by state law fiduciary duties and federal securities laws; shareholder derivative suits; capital structure and financing of corporations; and fundamental changes in corporate structure, such as mergers and sales of assets. The course serves as a prerequisite to advanced courses. PREREQUISITE: Business Fundamentals. GRADING NOTICE: The CR/NC/H option is only offered in Professor Marks's section. Ellias: This course is an introduction to the basic legal rules and principles governing corporations. We examine three basic problems: (1) conflicts between a firm's managers and its owners (the shareholders); (2) conflicts between shareholders; and (3) conflicts between shareholders and creditors. We examine the costs associated with these conflicts and how markets, legal rules, and contracts might reduce them. This is a foundational law school course that provides the fundamental knowledge of business and finance needed for upper level classes. No prior knowledge of business or finance is expected. PREREQUISITE: Business Fundamentals. GRADING NOTICE: This class does not offer the CR/NC/H option.

FALL 2017: LAW JD 816 A1 , Sep 6th to Dec 6th 2017
Days Start End Credits Instructors Bldg Room
Mon,Wed 2:10 pm 4:10 pm 4 Frederick Tung LAW 414
FALL 2017: LAW JD 816 M1 , Sep 5th to Dec 7th 2017
Days Start End Credits Instructors Bldg Room
Tue,Thu 2:10 pm 4:10 pm 4 Stephen G. Marks LAW 103
SPRG 2018: LAW JD 816 E1 , Jan 16th to Apr 24th 2018
Days Start End Credits Instructors Bldg Room
Tue,Thu 8:30 am 10:30 am 4 Staff
SPRG 2018: LAW JD 816 W1 , Jan 17th to Apr 25th 2018
Days Start End Credits Instructors Bldg Room
Mon,Wed 10:40 am 12:40 pm 4 Stephen G. Marks

3 credits

The premise of the course is that there is a generic set of economic challenges common to all complex business transactions, and that there are systematic approaches to the design of contractual responses to each of those problems. The economic structure of these challenges and responses provides a framework through which to analyze transactions. In this course, we first learn a conceptual framework for thinking about economic problems in contracting and we then "test" the framework by analyzing real transactions, with the aid of attorneys that worked on them. PREREQUISITE: Corporations. RECOMMENDED COURSES: Bankruptcy; Securities Regulation; Mergers & Acquisitions; any upper class business law classes are helpful. NOTES: This class does not satisfy the upper-class writing requirement. GRADING NOTICE: This class does not offer the CR/NC/H option. ** A student who fails to attend the initial meeting of a seminar (designated by an (S) in the title), or to obtain permission to be absent from either the instructor or the Registrar, may be administratively dropped from the seminar. Students who are on a wait list for a seminar are required to attend the first seminar meeting to be considered for enrollment.

SPRG 2018: LAW JD 999 A1 , Jan 17th to Apr 25th 2018
Days Start End Credits Instructors Bldg Room
Wed 4:20 pm 6:20 pm 3 Staff

3 credits

With few exceptions fiduciary law appears in all legal subjects: contract, tort and property; trusts and estates, agency and partnership; corporation and securities regulation; criminal law, health law, and civil procedure. You cannot escape it. We learn snippets of the subjects in different contexts. This course offers a view of fiduciary law as a legal category, highlights its uniqueness and history, and predicts its future development or disappearance. We sample statutory and common law fiduciaries of various kinds and ask: When and why do fiduciary duties arise? Why so many different fiduciaries with similar, but different rules? Are family members, the clergy, and broker-dealers fiduciaries? What are the remedies for the breach of their duties? Is contract a good and simplified substitute to this mess? Can civil law and common law systems in the fiduciary law area be unified, as we move to, or already are in, a global business environment? Course reading materials are a manuscript in the making. Students' comments and contributions are very welcome. **A student who fails to attend the initial meeting of a seminar (designated by an (S) in the title), or to obtain permission to be absent from either the instructor or the Registrar, may be administratively dropped from the seminar. Students who are on a wait list for a seminar are required to attend the first seminar meeting to be considered for enrollment.

2 credits

The Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (PPACA), better known as health care reform, is the most important and controversial piece of federal social legislation of this generation. It is also basically an insurance regulatory statute. PPACA establishes a new and complex set of rules governing the operation of the health insurance industry, provides consumers with important rights with respect to access to medical care and imposes obligations with respect to health insurance on both businesses and individuals. The course will look at PPACA and the issues that surrounded its enactment--issues which continue to fuel debate over whether it should modified or repealed. This will be done as part of an examination of the regulatory rules that govern all of insurance industry?s products (annuities, auto, home owners? product liability, life insurance, etc). The course also takes a look at the insurance industry?s structure and financial performance and at the competitive interactions between the insurance, banking and securities industries. The impact on the industry of the financial crisis of 2008 and the resulting Dodd-Frank reform legislation will be reviewed.

FALL 2017: LAW BK 990 A1 , Sep 11th to Dec 4th 2017
Days Start End Credits Instructors Bldg Room
Mon 2:10 pm 4:10 pm 2 Raymond A. Guenter LAW 508

2 credits

The course will offer a careful introduction to some of the tools used in the analysis of problems encountered in the social sciences, principally economics and finance, but also in fields as diverse as political science, sociology, and public health. The topics principally covered will consist of discounting (that is, the computation of present and future values); an elementary introduction to probability and statistics, sufficient to acquaint the student with the determination and significance of the expected value, variance, and standard deviation of a discrete probability distribution or the outcomes of an experiment; and some of the principal tools used to analyze decisions made under conditions of uncertainty, including statistical decision theory and expected utility (in connection with which the course will include a formal introduction to "risk tolerance", and what it means to be risk-loving, risk-neutral, or risk-averse). The course will include applications of these tools to the study of legal issues.

SPRG 2018: LAW JD 997 A1 , Jan 18th to Apr 19th 2018
Days Start End Credits Instructors Bldg Room
Thu 2:10 pm 4:10 pm 2 Theodore S. Sims

4 credits

The income tax is a pervasive feature of life in the United States and lawyers encounter tax issues in virtually every field of practice. This course introduces students to the fundamental principles of the federal income tax, and its impact on a wide range of matters, including employment, tort claims, divorce, retirement, and especially business activities and investments of all types. Topics include: the concept of income, determination of gross income, allowance of deductions and the determination of taxable income, identification of the taxpayer, taxable periods and timing, the determination of gain or loss (including realization and recognition) from dealings in property, the concept of income tax basis, and the process of change in the tax law. GRADING NOTICE: This course does not offer the CR/NC/H option.

FALL 2017: LAW JD 889 A1 , Sep 6th to Dec 6th 2017
Days Start End Credits Instructors Bldg Room
Mon,Wed 10:40 am 12:40 pm 4 Alan L. Feld LAW 103
FALL 2017: LAW JD 889 W1 , Sep 5th to Dec 7th 2017
Days Start End Credits Instructors Bldg Room
Tue,Thu 9:00 am 10:30 am 4 David I. Walker LAW 103
Fri 9:00 am 10:20 am 4 David I. Walker LAW 103
SPRG 2018: LAW JD 889 S1 , Jan 16th to Apr 24th 2018
Days Start End Credits Instructors Bldg Room
Tue,Thu 9:00 am 10:30 am 4 Theodore S. Sims
Fri 9:00 am 10:20 am 4 Theodore S. Sims

1 credits

This seminar is designed to provide students with an introductory and practical understanding of certain fundamental aspects of corporate financial restructuring. The seminar focuses on the representation of distressed companies, major creditors, and investors in high-stakes restructuring matters, with an emphasis on (i) comparing out-of-court and in-court restructuring alternatives for distressed companies and their stakeholders; (ii) benefits and risks associated with the commencement and administration of a case under chapter 11 of the Bankruptcy Code; (iii) the typical timeline, major players, and milestones associated with the chapter 11 process; (iv) strategies for effective restructuring negotiations; and (v) "hot topic" controversies in recent chapter 11 cases. Course materials will consist of recent court decisions and pleadings from noteworthy chapter 11 cases, and select articles concerning significant developments in restructuring law and practice. In addition to class participation, grading will be based upon one term paper of approximately 12 -- 15 pages in length. NOTE: This seminar does not satisfy the Upper-class Writing Requirement. Meeting dates - September 7 to November 2. **A student who fails to attend the initial meeting of a seminar (designated by an (S) in the title), or to obtain permission to be absent from either the instructor or the Registrar, may be administratively dropped from the seminar. Students who are on a wait list for a seminar are required to attend the first seminar meeting to be considered for enrollment.

FALL 2017: LAW JD 770 A1 , Sep 7th to Oct 12th 2017
Days Start End Credits Instructors Bldg Room
Thu 2:10 pm 4:10 pm 1 Zachary H. SmithMark P. Kronfeld LAW 418

3 credits

This course covers the core legal concepts underlying compliance -- the new paradigm in corporate accountability -- and its impact on transnational business operations. We will examine the Federal Sentencing Guidelines for Organizations; the Foreign Corrupt Practices Act and the Sarbanes Oxley Act, as well as guidance issued by the Department of Justice and the Securities and Exchange Commission. You'll learn how to: * Identify an enterprise's compliance obligations; * Assess the legal risks associated with those obligations; * Build a compliance and ethics program that effectively mitigates legal risk; and, * Generate value through compliance and ethics.

FALL 2017: LAW JD 778 A1 , Sep 5th to Dec 7th 2017
Days Start End Credits Instructors Bldg Room
Tue,Thu 2:15 pm 3:45 pm 3 Babak Boghraty LAW 413

3 credits

This course will cover the principal legal, tax and business issues of mergers and acquisitions. PREREQUISITE: Corporations or permission of instructor.

FALL 2017: LAW JD 988 A1 , Sep 5th to Dec 7th 2017
Days Start End Credits Instructors Bldg Room
Tue,Thu 11:00 am 12:25 pm 3 Stephen G. Marks LAW 605
SPRG 2018: LAW JD 988 B1 , Jan 16th to Apr 24th 2018
Days Start End Credits Instructors Bldg Room
Tue,Thu 11:00 am 12:30 pm 3 Staff

2 credits

This course provides an introduction to the field of microfinance, particularly its rapid evolution and role in economic development. Students will learn key concepts including the study of lending methodologies, products available to micro-entrepreneurs and the legal challenges, public policy considerations, and risks faced by investors, technical experts and financial providers. This course will also examine financial practices in the developing world such as payment and remittance systems, which allow foreign nationals to transfer funds internationally within and outside traditional banking systems.

SPRG 2018: LAW BK 935 A1 , Jan 22nd to Apr 23rd 2018
Days Start End Credits Instructors Bldg Room
Mon 6:20 pm 8:10 pm 2 Kevin M. Saunders

3 credits

Investment companies have become an important part of the financial system. This course is designed to familiarize students with the special laws governing investment companies: their creation, structure, corporate governance, operations (including the distribution of shares and the management of the portfolios), dissolution and, time permitting, taxation. In particular, the course will focus on the Investment Company Act of 1940 and on the practice in this area before the Securities and Exchange Commission.

FALL 2017: LAW JD 852 A1 , Sep 6th to Dec 6th 2017
Days Start End Credits Instructors Bldg Room
Mon,Wed 11:00 am 12:25 pm 3 Tamar Frankel LAW 204

2 credits

Tax aspects of international business transactions, both "inbound" and "outbound", with particular attention to fiscal jurisdiction, the foreign tax credit, allocation of income among affiliated companies, treaties, anti-abuse measures aimed at tax haven operations, information reporting and foreign investment in U.S. securities and real estate. Prerequisite or corequisite: Federal Income Taxation I.

FALL 2017: LAW TX 906 A1 , Sep 11th to Dec 4th 2017
Days Start End Credits Instructors Bldg Room
Mon 4:20 pm 6:20 pm 2 William W. Park LAW 605
FALL 2017: LAW TX 906 OL , Sep 5th to Dec 11th 2017
Days Start End Credits Instructors Bldg Room
ARR TBD TBD 2 Park

2 credits

This course explores the financial characteristics and income taxation of financial instruments, with an emphasis on both policy and theory. We start with the building blocks of debt and equity, move on to the "derivatives" level of options and notional principal contracts (swaps), and conclude with exotica such as currency products. In each instance we will first look at the financial characteristics of the security (after the fashion of an MBA offering in corporate finance), and then study the tax rules governing each class of instrument. Because discounting (net present value) and "pay off" diagrams are so central to an understanding of financial instruments, the course incorporates a rigorous study of these mathematical tools. Also, when studying the tax rules applicable to financial products, we focus on the fundamental building blocks of taxation -- amount, timing, character, and source -- to reveal underlying policy and theory tensions that go to the very root of our income taxation system. The course is intended to complement TX 949 Taxation of Financial Products: Principles and Application, and may be taken either prior or subsequent to that class or on a stand alone basis. Pre or Co-requisite: Federal Income Taxation I and II.

Online section not open to JD students.

SPRG 2018: LAW TX 917 A1 , Jan 22nd to Apr 23rd 2018
Days Start End Credits Instructors Bldg Room
Mon 6:30 pm 8:30 pm 2 Ameek A. Ponda
SPRG 2018: LAW TX 917 OL , Jan 16th to May 1st 2018
Days Start End Credits Instructors Bldg Room
ARR TBD TBD 2 Ameek A. Ponda

2 credits

An in-depth study of the "nuts and bolts" of the taxation of financial products. The course, which is designed to provide a hands-on knowledge-base for current and aspiring financial-services tax professionals, will have three main components. It will begin with a comprehensive examination of the taxation of debt instruments, with an intensive review of original issue discount and related rules. Next, it will turn to the taxation of derivatives, including options, forwards, futures, swaps and variable annuities. It will conclude with a review of the federal government's response to perceived abuses involving financial instruments, covering areas including constructive sales, constructive ownership transactions and the tax shelter regulations. Some use of a financial calculator or spreadsheets will be required. The course is intended to complement TX 917 Taxation of Financial Products: Policy and Theory and may be taken either prior or subsequent to that class or on a stand-alone basis. Prerequisite or corequisite: Federal Income Taxation I and II

Online section not open to JD students.

Transactional Courses

2 credits

This course studies the legal problems involved in negotiating and documenting various types of commercial lending transactions ranging from short-term unsecured loans to secured and long-term financings. The process is followed from the initial identification of a lending opportunity to pre- commitment correspondence and commitment letters, through to the key documents required at closing. The major aspects of a loan agreement, including definitional provisions, representations and warranties, lending provisions, pricing, affirmative and negative covenants, and events of defaults are studied in detail in an effort to insure that each student understands the mechanics of a commercial loan agreement. Security interests in real estate and personal property are addressed. Loan syndications and the loan markets are examined. Issues relating to guaranties and subordination agreements are considered. Overviews of Chapter 11 bankruptcy and lender liability are provided. Provisions of the Bank Holding Company Act relating to financing transactions, legal lending limits, margin requirements, and usury are considered. A lecture and discussion format is employed. Reading assignments include relevant court decisions, articles, and actual transaction documents.

FALL 2017: LAW BK 991 A1 , Sep 5th to Dec 5th 2017
Days Start End Credits Instructors Bldg Room
Tue 2:10 pm 4:10 pm 2 Richard Daingerfield LAW 605

3 credits

The premise of the course is that there is a generic set of economic challenges common to all complex business transactions, and that there are systematic approaches to the design of contractual responses to each of those problems. The economic structure of these challenges and responses provides a framework through which to analyze transactions. In this course, we first learn a conceptual framework for thinking about economic problems in contracting and we then "test" the framework by analyzing real transactions, with the aid of attorneys that worked on them. PREREQUISITE: Corporations. RECOMMENDED COURSES: Bankruptcy; Securities Regulation; Mergers & Acquisitions; any upper class business law classes are helpful. NOTES: This class does not satisfy the upper-class writing requirement. GRADING NOTICE: This class does not offer the CR/NC/H option. ** A student who fails to attend the initial meeting of a seminar (designated by an (S) in the title), or to obtain permission to be absent from either the instructor or the Registrar, may be administratively dropped from the seminar. Students who are on a wait list for a seminar are required to attend the first seminar meeting to be considered for enrollment.

SPRG 2018: LAW JD 999 A1 , Jan 17th to Apr 25th 2018
Days Start End Credits Instructors Bldg Room
Wed 4:20 pm 6:20 pm 3 Staff

3 credits

This course is designed to give students a broad overview of the law--domestic, foreign, and international--governing international business transactions. With the significant growth in international commerce and trade, and the forces of economic and social globalization, lawyers will increasingly confront international legal issues during their professional careers. This course will focus on the legal problems encountered in business ventures that cross national borders. Topics include formation of contracts, choice of law, financing the international sale of goods through letters of credit, regulation of international trade, the organizations and operations of the institutions of the World Trade Organization, foreign investment, international dispute settlement, and international transfer of intellectual property. GRADING NOTICE: This course does not offer the CR/NC/H option.

SPRG 2018: LAW JD 842 A1 , Jan 16th to Apr 24th 2018
Days Start End Credits Instructors Bldg Room
Tue,Thu 2:10 pm 3:35 pm 3 Rebecca Ingber

2 credits

This course focuses on the structure, documentation and negotiation of a typical project finance transaction. The class will explore legal, financial, and policy problems involved in investing in domestic and cross- border power and infrastructure projects. We will focus on strategies and techniques of structuring and financing such investments, and will touch upon the legal and regulatory environment for investment, and in the context of foreign investment, the role of political risk management and the implications of treaties, conventions, and other relevant law. Selected domestic and cross- border investment transactions, both actual and hypothetical, will be used to illustrate recurring issues. This course may contain a graded group drafting component where students draft and negotiate a loan agreement.

SPRG 2018: LAW BK 957 A1 , Jan 17th to Apr 25th 2018
Days Start End Credits Instructors Bldg Room
Wed 2:10 pm 4:10 pm 2 Kathleen M. Phelps

2 credits

This course examines legal issues arising in debt financing provided by financial institutions in international markets. The structure of transnational loan agreements, guarantees, letters of credit, participation and loan sales transactions, and basic instruments and documents common to trade financing are examined. The nature of the documentation and techniques used in such transactions, as well as regulatory patterns, legal problems and international law reform efforts, are studied. The course also covers issues related to the syndication of debt financing transactions, governing law, and creditor remedies.

SPRG 2018: LAW BK 958 A1 , Jan 22nd to Apr 23rd 2018
Days Start End Credits Instructors Bldg Room
Mon 4:20 pm 6:20 pm 2 Ian Wenniger