Fall 2017 Courses

*Click the course title links to access course location, scheduling, and other details.

Sacred Texts and Traditions

THE BIBLE
CAS RN 106 (4 credits) Prof. Michael Zank
Introductory study of Jewish and Christian scriptures; connections between biblical and related ancient cultures; biblical genres (epic narrative, law, prophecy, poetry, historiography, gospels, letters, apocalypse) and their literary character, major classical and modern strategies of reading. Carries humanities divisional credit in CAS.

JUDAISM IN THE MODERN PERIOD
CAS RN 328 (4 credits) Prof. Steven Katz
Exploration of complex encounters between Judaism and modernity from the Renaissance and Reformation to expulsion from Spain and creation of Jewish centers in the New World; emancipation and its consequences; assimilation, conversion, Reform Judaism, Zionism, the American Jewish community, modern anti-Semitism.

HEBREW BIBLE 1
STH TO 704 (4 credits) Prof. Alejandro Botta, Prof. Katheryn Darr
Introduction to the religion and literature of ancient Israel; development of Hebrew scripture within its cultural, historical, and social contexts. Required of all students who have not completed a thorough introduction to the Hebrew Bible. A one-hour study section is also required. This course is prerequisite for all Hebrew Bible II courses. MDIV & MTS CORE REQUIREMENT.


Jewish Thought and Philosophy

MODERN JEWISH THOUGHT
CAS RN 329/629 (4 credits) Prof. Michael Zank
Reading Jewish thinkers from the radical Enlightenment to twentieth century existentialism and Zionism, this course introduces some of the great philosophical debates on religion and secularism, revelation and scientific reason, and ethnic particularism and universal ethics.

MYSTICISM AND PHILOSOPHY: JEWISH AND ISLAMIC PERSPECTIVES
CAS RN 338 / PH 408 / RN 368 / STH TT 811 (4 credits) Prof. Diana Lobel
Thematic introduction to mysticism and philosophy, with a focus on dynamics of religious experience. Readings from medieval Jewish and Islamic philosophy; Sufi mysticism and philosophy; Kabbalah, Biblical interpretation, Sufi poetry, Hebrew poetry from the Golden Age of Muslim Spain.


Writing

WRITING SEMINAR: AFTER AUSCHWITZ: THE SEARCH FOR EHTICS IN POST-HOLOCAUST THOUGHT
CAS WR 100 M9 (4 credits) Prof. Ingrid Anderson

WRITING SEMINAR: BEYOND NIGHT: THE WORK OF ELIE WIESEL
CAS WR 100 K8 (4 credits) Prof. Ingrid Anderson

WRITING SEMINAR: GLOBAL JUDAISMS
CAS WR 100 L9 (4 credits) Prof. Ingrid Anderson


Holocaust and Genocide Studies

REPRESENTATIONS OF THE HOLOCAUST IN LITERATURE AND FILM
CAS XL 281 / RN 385 / RN 685 / CI 269 / STH TX 899 (4 credits) Prof. Nancy Harrowitz
Questions of representation in literature and film about the Holocaust, including testimonial and fictive works by Wiesel and Levi, Ozick, and others; films include documentaries and feature films. Discussions of the Holocaust as historical reality, metaphor, and generative force in literature. Also offered as CAS CI 269 A1 and CAS RN 385 A1.

PRIMO LEVI WITHIN HOLOCAUST STUDIES
CAS RN 459 / XL 459 / LI 459 (4 credits) Prof. Nancy Harrowitz
A study of Primo Levi’s writings and scientific, theological, and philosophical approaches to the Holocaust. Other theorists (Arendt, Wiesel, Müller-Hill) and other survivors’ testimonies (Delbo, Borowski, Fink) are read in conjunction with Levi’s works. Also offered as CAS LI 459 and CAS XL 459.

THE HOLOCAUST
CAS RN 384 (4 credits) Prof. Steven Katz
Background of German (and European) anti-Semitism. Rise of Nazism and early oppression, initial Jewish reaction, mechanics of destruction, ghettos, camps, world response and nonresponse, literature of the Holocaust, and religious implications.


Literature and the Arts

INTRODUCTION TO MIDDLE EASTERN LITERATURES
CAS XL 223 (4 credits) Prof. Abigail Gillman
Introduces basic methods of comparative literary study through close readings of some of the most influential texts of Arabic, Persian, Turkish, and Hebrew literature. Readings may include The Arabian Nights, Shahnameh, lyric poetry, and novels from the twentieth century. Carries humanities divisional credit in CAS.


Hebrew Language and Literature

FUNDAMENTALS OF MODERN HEBREW 1
CAS LH 111 (4 credits) Prof. Miriam Angrist
For students with no previous knowledge of Hebrew or minimal background. Introduction to the language of contemporary Israel. Fundamentals of grammar, extensive practice in speaking, reading, and writing about topics such as getting acquainted, learning and living situations. Curriculum incorporates technology and original Israeli materials.

INTERMEDIATE MODERN HEBREW 1
CAS LH 211 (4 credits) Prof. Miriam Angrist
Reinforces and expands vocabulary, grammar and language structures, leading to a deeper comprehension of style and usage. Focuses on language skills (speaking and writing) and performing more complex tasks such as comparing, narrating, describing, reasoning, and discussing topics beyond the immediate environment.

SIXTH-SEMESTER HEBREW
CAS LH 312 (4 credits) Prof. Miriam Angrist
Advanced mastery of the full range of Hebrew language usages and styles through written, audio and visual materials. Theme for Fall 2017: Israeli Food Culture in Israel.

ISRAELI CULTURE THROUGH FILM
CAS LH 453 / LH 283 / CI 270 (4 credits) Prof. Abigail Gillman
Advanced Hebrew language course, developing Hebrew comprehension and other skills. Israeli society, from its origins to contemporary times, through the medium of film. Topics include immigration; Jewish religious life; war; the ongoing impact of the Holocaust on Israeli society; gender; and the Israeli- Palestinian conflict. Introduction to film analysis and interpretive methods. Also offered as CAS CI 270 and CAS LH 283.

BIBLICAL HEBREW 1
STH TO 723 (4 credits) Prof. Katheryn Darr
Hebrew grammar, including exercises in translation and composition, following Lambdin’s Introduction to Biblical Hebrew. Prepares students to read Hebrew prose. (Credit for STH TO 723 is given only after successful completion of STH TO 724.)


Israel Studies

ISRAELI-PALESTINIAN CONFLICT
CAS HI 393(4 credits) Prof. Nahum Karlinsky
History of the Israeli-Palestinian conflict, analysis of conflicting narratives through primary sources and film. Students present their own reflections on the conflict and debate possibilities of resolution. Counts toward majors and minors in History, International Relations, Middle East & North Africa Studies, and Jewish Studies.