Urban Course Catalog

Spring 2021 Courses on Cities and Urban Affairs

The Initiative on Cities compiles a list of urban-related course offerings at Boston University. Courses are organized by topic, and include offerings from a wide range of disciplines across BU’s schools and colleges. The list below also includes a category for courses that fulfill the Urban Studies Minor.

Please note, courses may be listed in multiple topics. Course offerings are subject to change, and we do our best to keep this list comprehensive and up-to-date. If you are aware of a course that you believe should be included in this list, please email us at ioc@bu.edu.

Select a Topic

    Architecture/Urban Planning/Design/Development

    CAS AH 387 – BOSTON ARCHITECTURE AND URBANISM

    This class presents a history of Boston from the seventeenth through twenty- first centuries, as seen through the region’s architectural and urban history. Major buildings, architects, and urban planning schemes are examined in terms of economic, political, social, and institutional histories. Effective Summer 2020, this course fulfills a single unit in each of the following BU Hub areas: Social Inquiry I, Oral and/or Signed Communication, Teamwork/Collaboration. MORE

    CAS AH 398 – TWENTIETH-CENTURY ARCHITECTURE

    This course provides an introduction to the major developments in architecture and urban planning from ca. 1900 to the present. It traces the proliferation of modernist thought through key projects but also to everyday buildings and landscapes. Effective Fall 2018, this course fulfills a single unit in each of the following BU Hub areas: Historical Consciousness, Global Citizenship and Intercultural Literacy. MORE

    KHC EC 103 – HOUSING POLICY: AN ECONOMIC PRESPECTIVE

    This course introduces students to economic analysis through the study of housing policy. The course covers both microeconomic issues related to housing affordability and macroeconomic issues related to the stabilization of the housing market and the Great Recession. Throughout, the course will teach students economic principles and how use data to assess economic arguments. Effective Fall 2018, this course fulfills a single unit in each of the following BU Hub areas: Social Inquiry II, Quantitative Reasoning II, Research and Information Literacy. MORE

    KHC HC 401 – THE PROCESS OF DISCOVERY

    This course introduces students to a variety of research methodologies, including qualitative and quantitative research techniques, data analysis and visualization, and interdisciplinary strategies relevant to students in all disciplines. The course material will be couched in a provocative current issue, such as urban development or gun violence in an effort to engage students in robust conversation. Effective Fall 2019, this course fulfills a single unit in each of the following BU Hub areas: Quantitative Reasoning II, Research and Information Literacy, Teamwork/Collaboration. MORE

    MET UA 509 – PUBLIC FINANCE AND URBAN INFRASTRUCTURE

    Economic, social, and political aspects of state and local government finances. Theory of public finance; revenues, expenditures, and survey of budgetary processes. Planning techniques in capital budgeting and other finance activities. Selected issues: debt, user fees, property taxes, and incentives. MORE

    MET UA 510 – SELECTED TOPICS IN URBAN AFFAIRS

    For Spring 2021, the course is offering a special topic — New Trends in Transportation. More may be announced. MORE

    MET UA 654 – GEOGRAPHIC INFORMATION SYSTEMS FOR PLANNERS

    Geographic Information Systems for Planners provides an introduction to Geographic Information Systems (GIS) specifically with a focus on applications in urban planning. The role of spatial analysis in local, state and regional planning has steadily increased over the last decade with the infusion of windows-based GIS software such as ESRI ArcGIS. The class focus is to prepare students to feel comfortable communicating with other GIS users, research spatial data, and produce high quality digital maps in an applied learning environment. MORE

    MET UA 715 – PLANNING AND LAND USE LAW

    Planning, zoning, subdivisions, eminent domain, exactions, impact fees, and other land use controls: what are they, how do they operate, what are the limitations on their use? In this course, we will explore the use of those tools for planning and development and read and understand the important U.S. Supreme Court and state court decisions that have shaped and continue to influence planning and land use throughout the country. We will see the connection between land use controls and court decisions and how each has evolved to meet changing conditions and goals. We will also review the structure of the U.S. legal system and create a framework for understanding constitutional requirements on eminent domain, due process, and equal protection from a planner’s perspective. MORE

    MET UA 805 – URBAN STUDIES CAPSTONE

    The capstone course integrates the principles and applications of the major area of study of City Planning, Urban Affairs and Public Policy. During the course of the semester, students are required to work in groups to complete a comprehensive project which serves as an evaluative tool for student achievement for the major learning goals of the Programs. The course is primarily student driven, and is aimed to foster interdisciplinary partnerships and help cultivate industry alliances and cooperation. Recognizing the unique and diverse characteristics of the Boston urban environment, the capstone projects will be drawn from a range of topical issues that are currently ongoing in the greater Boston metropolitan area. The project-based course emphasizes the interdisciplinary nature of city planning and urban affairs and provides students the direct opportunity to gain experience with real-world projects and stakeholders. MORE

    Arts/Culture

    CAS AA 215 – ARTS OF AFRICA AND ITS DIASPORA

    Exploration of a diversity of visual and performing arts from Africa, including royal regalia, masquerades, and contemporary painting. Examines how the dispersal of Africans, due to the transatlantic slave trade and immigration, contributed to the cultural richness of the Americas. Carries humanities divisional credit in CAS. Effective Fall 2019, this course fulfills a single unit in each of the following BU Hub areas: Aesthetic Exploration, Global Citizenship and Intercultural Literacy, Critical Thinking. MORE

    CAS AH 527 – TOPICS IN ART AND SOCIETY

    May be repeated for credit as topics change. Two topics are offered Fall 2020. Section B1: Picturing Property: Real Estate in American Visual Culture. Explores the roles that visual representations have played in American real estate markets and examines the creative ways that artists and writers have interpreted the objects, figures, practices of the land business during the past two centuries. Section C1: Cathedrals and Castles: the Art and Architecture of Medieval Europe. Castles and cathedrals with their splendid treasures from gold and gem- studded objects to vast stained-glass windows, precious textiles, and illuminated manuscripts are explored as the backdrop for the social political, religious, and cultural conditions of the period. MORE

    CAS AH 591 – SEMINAR IN PHOTOGRAPHIC HISTORY

    New topic each semester MORE

    CAS AN 220 – URBAN ANTHROPOLOGY

    An introduction to classic and contemporary definitions of the city and ethnographic approaches to the study of urban life. Examines urban inequalities and the stratification of space by immigration, gender, racialization, and poverty. Participants conduct mini- ethnographic projects in the city of Boston. Effective Fall 2019, this course fulfills a single unit in each of the following BU Hub areas: Social Inquiry I, The Individual in Community, Research and Information Literacy. MORE

    CAS LS 576 – TOPICS IN SPANISH AMERICAN LITERATURE

    Topic for Spring 2021: After the Conquest: Literatures of Afro-Indo-Latin- America. Surveys the literary production of Colonial Latin America privileging the under-represented voices and discursive practices that contributed decisively to the formation of the region’s unique culture. MORE

    CAS SO 244 – URBAN SOCIOLOGY

    An analysis of cities and urban phenomena in preindustrial, industrial, and postindustrial societies with an emphasis on European and U.S. urbanization. A comparison of social scientific theories used to explain urban dynamics, processes, and policies. Carries social science divisional credit in CAS. This course fulfills a single unit in each of the following BU Hub areas: Individual in Community, Critical Thinking, Social Inquiry I. MORE

    CAS SO 208 – SOCIOLOGICAL APPROACHES TO CURRENT ISSUES: COMMUNITY SOCIOLOGY

    Explores how sociologists understand community and how race, ethnicity, and religion shape the boundaries of community attachment. Readings include empirical studies of what community on the American landscape has looked like since the 1930s. MORE

    CFA ME 841 – QUANTITATIVE RESEARCH METHODS

    Quantitative research methods and their application to educational research contexts; quantitative research design, sampling techniques, reliability and validity, descriptive and inferential statistics, quantitative studies in music education, and using software to conduct statistical analysis. Prerequisite required: ME 859 Problems, Theories, and Literature (4 cr.) MORE

    CFA ME 842 – QUALITATIVE RESEARCH METHODS

    This course introduces graduate students to key issues and concepts in qualitative research. Students develop skills in conducting interviews, and observations; they gain experience with ethnographic and narrative techniques including transcribing, coding, interpreting data and presenting results of analysis. Prerequisite required: ME 859 Problems, Theories, and Literature (4 cr.) MORE

    MET AR 779 – PUBLIC ART PROGRAM ADMINISTRATION

    A hands on project-based collaborative class that will conceptualize, plan, and execute a public art project during the semester. Students will develop an understanding of the various challenges administrators face in all phases of a project, especially from the creative vantage of the artist. We will explore project funding, case study analysis of public art management, artist selection, and the unforeseen MORE

    MET MG 545 – INTRODUCTION TO AMERICAN MANAGEMENT, CULTURE AND INSTITUTIONS

    This course is intended primarily for international students to introduce them to American institutions — business, educational, and political in particular — within the context of American history, popular culture, and society. Students will learn about the unique features of American management and enterprise. The Boston metropolitan area will play an important role in appreciating the overall historical and cultural context, as will contemporary issues, scholarship, and unfolding events in illustrating distinctive features of American life and commerce. MORE

    SSW MP 759 – COMMUNITIES AND ORGANIZATIONS: ANALYSIS AND INTERVENTION

    A foundation course that provides an orientation to macro social work as a core method for all practitioners. Students learn a common framework and practical skills for planning and implementing change in communities and organizations. The course emphasizes principles including social and economic justice and empowerment through an examination of racism and other intersecting oppressions, constituent-led change efforts, and a strengths-based orientation to practice in urban settings and other social environments. MORE

    Boston Region

    CAS AN 309 – BOSTON: AN ETHNOGRAPHIC APPROACH

    Using the tools of ethnographic practice, explores Boston’s multiple identities. Boston’s patterns of immigration and demographic change are mapped through fieldwork and historical documentation. On site observations will help students understand local meanings of place and community. MORE

    CAS AH 387 – BOSTON ARCHITECTURE AND URBANISM

    This class presents a history of Boston from the seventeenth through twenty- first centuries, as seen through the region’s architectural and urban history. Major buildings, architects, and urban planning schemes are examined in terms of economic, political, social, and institutional histories. Effective Summer 2020, this course fulfills a single unit in each of the following BU Hub areas: Social Inquiry I, Oral and/or Signed Communication, Teamwork/Collaboration. MORE

    GRS AN 709 – BOSTON: AN ETHNOGRAPHIC APPROACH

    An anthropological study of Boston using the city as a site of recovery and discovery as students develop ethnographic skills and an understanding of the interplay between geography, history, and demography in the social mapping of urban spaces. MORE

    MET UA 805 – URBAN STUDIES CAPSTONE

    The capstone course integrates the principles and applications of the major area of study of City Planning, Urban Affairs and Public Policy. During the course of the semester, students are required to work in groups to complete a comprehensive project which serves as an evaluative tool for student achievement for the major learning goals of the Programs. The course is primarily student driven, and is aimed to foster interdisciplinary partnerships and help cultivate industry alliances and cooperation. Recognizing the unique and diverse characteristics of the Boston urban environment, the capstone projects will be drawn from a range of topical issues that are currently ongoing in the greater Boston metropolitan area. The project-based course emphasizes the interdisciplinary nature of city planning and urban affairs and provides students the direct opportunity to gain experience with real-world projects and stakeholders. MORE

    QST SI 250 – IDEAS TO IMPACT

    This course is required for the Innovation and Entrepreneurship minor. The goal of this course is to expose students to the conceptual frameworks that guide ideation and innovation. Thus it will include all five learning principles the guide design of the Innovation and Entrepreneurship minor. The course analyzes the conditions that foster innovation as well as the process by which ideas progress from conception to implementation and execution, and the creation of either economic or social impact. Students will be exposed to theories on the conditions that affect the generation and development of creativity and innovation within individuals, teams, cities, and regions. To foster experiential learning, the whole class will be structured around the process of innovation with a “live case” that focuses on creating social innovations for the City of Boston. When people think about great social challenges, they often look afar to distant countries. Yet, many social problems lie right around the corner from students’ daily lives. Students will develop a toolkit comprised of brainstorming, design thinking, human centered design, prototyping, storyboarding and field research. Students will conduct original field research within the City of Boston and identify a challenge or problem to address which they will focus on for the duration of the course, culminating in final presentations. Effective Fall 2019, this course fulfills a single unit in each of the following BU Hub areas: Social Inquiry I, The Individual in Community, Creativity/Innovation. MORE

    BU Hub

    CAS AA 215 – ARTS OF AFRICA AND ITS DIASPORA

    Exploration of a diversity of visual and performing arts from Africa, including royal regalia, masquerades, and contemporary painting. Examines how the dispersal of Africans, due to the transatlantic slave trade and immigration, contributed to the cultural richness of the Americas. Carries humanities divisional credit in CAS. Effective Fall 2019, this course fulfills a single unit in each of the following BU Hub areas: Aesthetic Exploration, Global Citizenship and Intercultural Literacy, Critical Thinking. MORE

    CAS AH 387 – BOSTON ARCHITECTURE AND URBANISM

    This class presents a history of Boston from the seventeenth through twenty- first centuries, as seen through the region’s architectural and urban history. Major buildings, architects, and urban planning schemes are examined in terms of economic, political, social, and institutional histories. Effective Summer 2020, this course fulfills a single unit in each of the following BU Hub areas: Social Inquiry I, Oral and/or Signed Communication, Teamwork/Collaboration. MORE

    CAS AN 220 – URBAN ANTHROPOLOGY

    An introduction to classic and contemporary definitions of the city and ethnographic approaches to the study of urban life. Examines urban inequalities and the stratification of space by immigration, gender, racialization, and poverty. Participants conduct mini- ethnographic projects in the city of Boston. Effective Fall 2019, this course fulfills a single unit in each of the following BU Hub areas: Social Inquiry I, The Individual in Community, Research and Information Literacy. MORE

    CAS BI 306 – BIOLOGY OF GLOBAL CHANGE

    The ecological impacts of human activity on terrestrial and aquatic ecosystems. Climate change, forest decline, eutrophication, acidification, loss of species diversity, and restoration of ecosystems. Three hours lecture, three hours lab. Effective Fall 2019, this course fulfills a single unit in each of the following BU Hub areas: Scientific Inquiry II, Ethical Reasoning, Research and Information Literacy. MORE

    CAS EE 101 – NATURAL ENVIRONMENTS: THE ATMOSPHERE

    An introduction to weather and climate. Topics include the controls of weather and climate, day-to-day variations in weather, severe storms, climates of the world, urban climate and air pollution, past climates and climatic change, and the impact of climatic variations on society. Carries natural science divisional credit (with lab) in CAS. Effective Fall 2018, this course fulfills a single unit in each of the following BU Hub areas: Scientific Inquiry I, Quantitative Reasoning I. MORE

    CAS PO 141 – INTRODUCTION TO PUBLIC POLICY

    Undergraduate core course. What are public policies? Where do they come from? What are their effects? In this course, we grapple with these questions. We also examine the question: how do the politics of public policy affect racial and economic inequality? Carries social science divisional credit in CAS. Effective Fall 2018, this course fulfills a single unit in each of the following BU Hub areas: Social Inquiry I, Critical Thinking. MORE

    CAS PO 399 – DATA SCIENCE FOR POLITICS

    Data science is changing how we understand and study politics, policy, and decision-making. This course introduces students to the fundamental tools of data science, including collecting, modeling, and visualizing data, and how to apply these tools to study political and policy questions. Effective Spring 2020, this course fulfills a single unit in each of the following BU Hub areas: Quantitative Reasoning I, Digital/Multimedia Expression. MORE

    CAS SO 207 – SOCIOLOGY OF RACE AND ETHNICITY

    This course examines the fundamental theoretical and empirical approaches regarding race/ethnicity and the current state of race relations in the U.S. that explore both contemporary social problems and the deep historical roots of those problems through a sociological lens. Carries social science divisional credit in CAS. Also offered as CAS SO 207. Effective Fall 2019, this course fulfills a single unit in each of the following BU Hub areas: Historical Consciousness, The Individual in Community, Research and Information Literacy. MORE

    CAS SO 211 – CONFRONTING RACIAL, CULTURAL, GENDER, AND SOCIAL IDENTITIES IN URBAN CLASSROOMS: EDUCATIONAL AND SOCIOLOGICAL PERSPECTIVES

    Examines the sociological, cultural, and educational factors that contribute to the achievement gap and what it will take to close this gap. Course is taught at the Trotter School; transportation provided. Includes a field placement. Effective Fall 2019, this course fulfills a single unit in the following BU Hub area: Global Citizenship and Intercultural Literacy. MORE

    CAS SO 242 – GLOBALIZATION AND WORLD POVERTY

    (Meets with CAS IR 242.) Globalization and world poverty; how and why over 80% of the world remains poor and inequality increases despite economic modernization and democratization. Addresses urbanization, immigration, religion, politics, development politics, foreign aid, women, drugs, environment, food security. Special attention to Latin American, African, and Asian experiences. Carries social science divisional credit in CAS. Effective Fall 2018, this course fulfills a single unit in each of the following BU Hub areas: Social Inquiry I, Ethical Reasoning. MORE

    CAS SO 244 – URBAN SOCIOLOGY

    An analysis of cities and urban phenomena in preindustrial, industrial, and postindustrial societies with an emphasis on European and U.S. urbanization. A comparison of social scientific theories used to explain urban dynamics, processes, and policies. Carries social science divisional credit in CAS. This course fulfills a single unit in each of the following BU Hub areas: Individual in Community, Critical Thinking, Social Inquiry I. MORE

    CAS SO 335 – SOCIOLOGY OF RACE, CLASS, & GENDER

    Examines race, class, gender, and sexuality as intersecting axes of stratification, identity, and experience. No one of us is one thing, one identity, nor motivated by one singular interest, nor privileged or subjugated by one singular form of power, but how do those multiple forms of ourselves affect how we are advantaged, disadvantaged, viewed, and understood by the social world? Our social world, is, by default, a vast web of social intersections between and across groups with shared, overlapping, and conflicting identities. Race, class and gender affect nearly all of our lived experiences and greatly complicate and nuance concepts of diversity and difference. Also offered as CAS AA 335 and CAS WS 335. Effective Fall 2020, this course fulfills a single unit in each of the following BU Hub areas: Digital/Multimedia Expression, The Individual in Community, Historical Consciousness. MORE

    KHC EC 103 – HOUSING POLICY: AN ECONOMIC PRESPECTIVE

    This course introduces students to economic analysis through the study of housing policy. The course covers both microeconomic issues related to housing affordability and macroeconomic issues related to the stabilization of the housing market and the Great Recession. Throughout, the course will teach students economic principles and how use data to assess economic arguments. Effective Fall 2018, this course fulfills a single unit in each of the following BU Hub areas: Social Inquiry II, Quantitative Reasoning II, Research and Information Literacy. MORE

    KHC HC 401 – THE PROCESS OF DISCOVERY

    This course introduces students to a variety of research methodologies, including qualitative and quantitative research techniques, data analysis and visualization, and interdisciplinary strategies relevant to students in all disciplines. The course material will be couched in a provocative current issue, such as urban development or gun violence in an effort to engage students in robust conversation. Effective Fall 2019, this course fulfills a single unit in each of the following BU Hub areas: Quantitative Reasoning II, Research and Information Literacy, Teamwork/Collaboration. MORE

    SED SE 250 – DISABILITY, EDUCATION, AND PUBLIC POLICY

    Students will examine how disabilities impact students, their families, and their educational/community participation; analyze the historical treatment of individuals with disabilities; discuss contemporary ethical issues; learn federal legislation; and develop a foundational understanding of inclusive educational practices. Effective Fall 2019, this course fulfills a single unit in the following BU Hub areas: The Individual in Community, Ethical Reasoning. MORE

    SPH SB 820 – ASSESSMENT AND PLANNING FOR HEALTH PROMOTION

    This course will introduce students to neighborhoods of Boston and provide opportunities for acquiring and practicing community assessment skills. We address the fundamental question: How do public health scientists and practitioners demonstrate that a health problem in a community warrants intervention? Students will learn to consult the literature, large data sets (such as the U.S. Census, hospitalization data, vital records, and national survey data) and geographic/mapping data, as well as conduct key informant interviews and site visits to assess health promotion needs and assets of a specific neighborhood and groups. The course will culminate in the production of a community needs assessment report integrating the various sources of data gathered over the course of the semester. MORE

    SPH PH 510 – ESSENTIALS OF PUBLIC HEALTH

    Students will gain an understanding of public health as a broad, collective enterprise that seeks to extend the benefits of current biomedical, environmental, social, and behavioral knowledge in ways that maximize its impact on the health status of a population. The course will provide an overview of the public health approach including epidemiology, disease surveillance, sustainable solutions, social determinants of health, and disease prevention. Through active learning, students will learn skills in identifying and addressing an ever expanding list of health problems that call for collective action to protect, promote and improve our nation’s health, primarily through preventive strategies. Specific topics will include: food safety, toxics reduction, HIV/AIDS & COVID-19, vaccines, and tobacco control and prevention. PH510 is a requirement for obtaining an undergraduate minor in public health. It is appropriate for undergraduates and others who are not in an SPH degree program. It does not carry degree credit for MPH students. Effective Fall 2020, this course fulfills a single unit in each of the following BU Hub areas: Ethical Reasoning, Social Inquiry II, Critical Thinking. MORE

    SPH PM 840 – ANALYSIS OF CURRENT HEALTH POLICY ISSUES

    The purpose of this course is to arm students with the skills to debate, define, and defend health policy proposals. We will explore, in depth, several current health policy problems. The course will take an analytic case approach, identifying policy options and tools, then gathering information and applying data to evaluate outcomes, costs; winners and losers. Methods for finding and accessing information on the Internet are emphasized. This is a capstone course meant to be taken in the student’s last semester. MORE

    QST SI 250 – IDEAS TO IMPACT

    This course is required for the Innovation and Entrepreneurship minor. The goal of this course is to expose students to the conceptual frameworks that guide ideation and innovation. Thus it will include all five learning principles the guide design of the Innovation and Entrepreneurship minor. The course analyzes the conditions that foster innovation as well as the process by which ideas progress from conception to implementation and execution, and the creation of either economic or social impact. Students will be exposed to theories on the conditions that affect the generation and development of creativity and innovation within individuals, teams, cities, and regions. To foster experiential learning, the whole class will be structured around the process of innovation with a “live case” that focuses on creating social innovations for the City of Boston. When people think about great social challenges, they often look afar to distant countries. Yet, many social problems lie right around the corner from students’ daily lives. Students will develop a toolkit comprised of brainstorming, design thinking, human centered design, prototyping, storyboarding and field research. Students will conduct original field research within the City of Boston and identify a challenge or problem to address which they will focus on for the duration of the course, culminating in final presentations. Effective Fall 2019, this course fulfills a single unit in each of the following BU Hub areas: Social Inquiry I, The Individual in Community, Creativity/Innovation. MORE

    Crime/Criminal Justice

    MET CJ 251 – POLICE & SOCIETY

    This course provides a foundation for understanding the implications of policing in the United States. The course examines the historical development of policing in the U.S., the role of police in our society, police organizations and decision-making, policing strategies, as well as issues of authority and accountability. Throughout the course, several contemporary issues and controversies facing the police will be discussed including: police discrimination, police use of force practices, and other special topics. MORE

    MET CJ 352 – COURTS, SOCIETY, AND CRIMINAL PROCEDURE

    Federal, state, and local criminal courts and their relationship to contemporary social and political issues. Historical background of the current criminal court system. Institutional functions of the courts. Role of the courts in reducing crime. Judicial process and criminal procedure, case studies and court decisions. MORE

    MET CJ 511 – REHABILITATION AND RE-INTEGRATION

    Community re-integration following imprisonment has long been recognized as a significant problem. Longer sentences and rapid changes have created new problems for both returning inmates and those who provide services both inside and outside the criminal justice system. This course will examine rehabilitation philosophy in theory and practice. Lectures and seminars will address such issues as: the special problems in providing rehabilitation and education in the correctional system, the effect of inmate subculture on rehabilitation, and balancing demands for custody and rehabilitation. MORE

    MET CJ 570 – CRIMINOLOGY AND CRIME POLICY

    This course explores potential answers to complex and important questions about criminal behavior by drawing on the social science of criminology. Criminology is the interdisciplinary study of the development of law, criminal phenomena and societal responses to crime. The course has two primary focuses: 1) to explore and evaluate major explanations or theories of crime and 2) understand and evaluate the policy implications of major crime problems. Because criminology is interdisciplinary, students will examine theories that are grounded in a range of academic perspectives, including sociological, biological, political, psychological and economic explanations for crime. These theories will be centered on important public policy debates about a host of contemporary problems, including: firearm violence, high post- incarceration recidivism, opioid use disorder crisis and human trafficking. Course lectures and discussions focus on the historical development of the theories, their major assumptions and propositions, their relevance for public policy and practice. As the course progresses through each explanation for crime, students will have the opportunity to critically evaluate the validity of different explanations for crime as well as criminal justice policies and practices that they support. MORE

    MET CJ 612 – CRIME AND INTELLIGENCE ANALYSIS

    Contemporary law enforcement agencies regularly employ crime and intelligence analysis to develop and inform effective responses to crime. This course provides an in-depth examination of crime and intelligence analysis techniques. It also explores the role of the crime and intelligence analyst within law enforcement organizations and processes, the historical evolution of this approach, key legal and policy issues, and challenges to implementation. Students have the opportunity to apply these skills to case study simulations involving an array of common crime problems and cases using real-world examples and sources of information. MORE

    MET CJ 711 – CRIMINAL JUSTICE POLICY AND PLANNING

    This course will introduce you to the concepts of criminal justice policy and planning. You will be introduced to two major theories of planning and apply them to criminal justice settings. Additionally, you will learn the techniques for analyzing problems, developing programs and policies resulting from problem analysis, along with program and policy monitoring and evaluation. MORE

    Economics/Finance/Innovation

    CAS EC 390 – SPECIAL TOPICS IN ECONOMICS

    Topics and pre-requisites vary. May be repeated for credit if topic is different. Topic for Section AA: Urban and Regional Economics. The development of cities and the role of space in urban and rural economic development. Covers factors in geographic agglomeration of production. Examines sources of urban problems, and possible economic solutions. Prerequisites: CAS EC 201, EC 202, and EC 204. Topic for Section BB: Gender and Economics. The role of gender in the labor market, household decisions, and public policy issues. Explores the determinants and trends in women’s relative economic status with topics such as gender pay gap, labor market discrimination, and family related policies. Pre-requisites: CAS CAS EC 201, EC 203 or EC 303. MORE

    MET UA 509 – PUBLIC FINANCE AND URBAN INFRASTRUCTURE

    Economic, social, and political aspects of state and local government finances. Theory of public finance; revenues, expenditures, and survey of budgetary processes. Planning techniques in capital budgeting and other finance activities. Selected issues: debt, user fees, property taxes, and incentives. MORE

    MET UA 704 – URBAN ECONOMICS

    This course provides basic understanding of economics and approaches urban problems and planning issues from economic perspectives. It explores how microeconomic theories and models can help us understand how cities and regions function, analyze urban problems, and evaluate urban policies. This is a broad introductory survey course, focusing on how “microeconomic” actors including business firms, households, and nonprofit and government institutions – organize to provide for the sustaining and flourishing of life. MORE

    QST SI 250 – IDEAS TO IMPACT

    This course is required for the Innovation and Entrepreneurship minor. The goal of this course is to expose students to the conceptual frameworks that guide ideation and innovation. Thus it will include all five learning principles the guide design of the Innovation and Entrepreneurship minor. The course analyzes the conditions that foster innovation as well as the process by which ideas progress from conception to implementation and execution, and the creation of either economic or social impact. Students will be exposed to theories on the conditions that affect the generation and development of creativity and innovation within individuals, teams, cities, and regions. To foster experiential learning, the whole class will be structured around the process of innovation with a “live case” that focuses on creating social innovations for the City of Boston. When people think about great social challenges, they often look afar to distant countries. Yet, many social problems lie right around the corner from students’ daily lives. Students will develop a toolkit comprised of brainstorming, design thinking, human centered design, prototyping, storyboarding and field research. Students will conduct original field research within the City of Boston and identify a challenge or problem to address which they will focus on for the duration of the course, culminating in final presentations. Effective Fall 2019, this course fulfills a single unit in each of the following BU Hub areas: Social Inquiry I, The Individual in Community, Creativity/Innovation. MORE

    Education

    SED AP 526 – FAMILY AND COMMUNITY ENGAGEMENT

    Examines the role of schools, families and community agencies and the critical partnerships that must be forged between them to support student learning and well- being.? The primary goal of this seminar is to deepen understanding of the systemic obstacles — and possibilities — to improve our school systems and narrow achievement gaps. 2 cr. MORE

    SED AP 600 – DIVERSITY AND JUSTICE IN EDUCATION

    How schools, colleges, and other education settings are affected by the growing pluralism of our society; the tension between respect for diversity and the maintenance of common purpose. Strategies of integration and separate development and of remediation and enrichment. 4 cr. MORE

    SED ED 410 – SOCIAL CONTEXT OF EDUCATION

    How culture, race, language, poverty, social change, urban pressures, and rural isolation affect the work of schools and other educational institutions, based upon reading, discussion, field research, and extensive writing by students. SED ED 410 A1 and ED 412 A1 must be taken in the same semester or ED 410 B1 in the fall and ED 412 B1 in the spring. 2cr. MORE

    SED ED 412 – CIVIC CONTEXT OF EDUCATION

    Political and professional decision making in education in a democracy, emergent issues in educational policy, and the ethics of educational practice, based upon reading, discussion, planning exercises, and extensive writing by students. ED 410 A1 and ED 412 A1 must be taken in the same semester or ED 410 B1 in the fall and ED 412 B1 in the spring. 2cr. MORE

    SSW HB 727 – CHILD PSYCHOPATHOLOGY

    This course uses a developmental psychopathological model to explore complex psychological disturbances in children, adolescents, and families with a focus on the urban family experience. It addresses multiple research and theoretical perspectives that promote a way of understanding child and adolescent behaviors that change over time in the context of their genetic make-up, biological processes, interpersonal relationships, culture, and available community resources and support. The course promotes the importance of assessing in children and families both the historical and present risks for disturbed behavioral development and the historical and present protective factors that promote healthy and resilient behavioral development. MORE

    Environment/Sustainability/Ecology

    CAS EE 101 – NATURAL ENVIRONMENTS: THE ATMOSPHERE

    An introduction to weather and climate. Topics include the controls of weather and climate, day-to-day variations in weather, severe storms, climates of the world, urban climate and air pollution, past climates and climatic change, and the impact of climatic variations on society. Carries natural science divisional credit (with lab) in CAS. Effective Fall 2018, this course fulfills a single unit in each of the following BU Hub areas: Scientific Inquiry I, Quantitative Reasoning I. MORE

    CAS EE 309 – INTERMEDIATE ENVIRONMENTAL ANALYSIS AND POLICY

    Introduction to economic and environmental theory critical to the formulation and evaluation of environmental resource policy. This theory is applied to real- world analysis of climate change, population growth, oil supplies, energy use, and globalization. MORE

    CAS NS 433 – ADVANCED RESEARCH TOPICS

    Advanced humanities and social science seminar focusing on contemporary climate-related issues including urban/coastal resilience, poverty and justice, clean energy, human displacement, and national security. Emphasizes case study analysis and research methods. Requires field data collection, research paper, and symposium presentation. MORE

    GRS BI 795 – URBAN BIOGEOSCIENCE AND ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH: FROM RESEARCH TO POLICY

    Students learn how cities utilize scientific findings to address urban environmental challenges and develop communication skills to effectively translate scientific results to decision-makers and the public. Students complete a semester-long internship to gain experience applying scientific knowledge to decision making. MORE

    GRS EE 765 – URBAN BIOGEOSCIENCE AND ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH APPLIED RESEARCH METHODS

    Graduate students work in groups on real-world environmental challenges related to urban Biogeoscience and Environmental Health. Students use applied research methods in collaboration with stakeholders from cities on issues related to air, soil, and/or water quality, environmental stressors, nutrient cycles, and climate. MORE

    MET UA 610 – URBAN ENVIRONMENTAL ISSUES

    This course is designed to present a comprehensive approach to urban environmental issues by integrating environmental planning and policy. It is intended for both students with and without planning background. This course provides a broader view and discussion of natural resources planning relating to issues affecting urban watershed management. This approach includes water policy, sustainability of water resources, freshwater planning (Lakes and Rivers), coastal waters, open space protection, stormwater management, clean water act, wetland protection, low impact development, and stakeholder involvement with a focus on the means and techniques available to local governments to plan and protect watersheds. Case studies will be used to demonstrate the potential to address full range of urban watershed issues, including water supply planning, water quality restoration and protection, open space planning, habitat protection and ecological conservation, and enhancement and regulatory activities. MORE

    MET UA 627 – SUSTAINABLE CITIES

    Examines the theoretical elements of “sustainability” and their applicability in guiding development, particularly at the city level. Through a comparative study of a wide range of sustainable practices in important subfields of planning, such as transportation, landuse, and housing, students will learn about the constraints and opportunities different cities face, and how to effectively address them. Special attention will be given to the preparation of environmental impact statements and assessment of urban environmental quality. This is a project based course and includes lectures, discussions, workshops, case studies, selected guest speakers, and a final project. MORE

    Health

    GRS BI 795 – URBAN BIOGEOSCIENCE AND ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH: FROM RESEARCH TO POLICY

    Students learn how cities utilize scientific findings to address urban environmental challenges and develop communication skills to effectively translate scientific results to decision-makers and the public. Students complete a semester-long internship to gain experience applying scientific knowledge to decision making. MORE

    GRS EE 765 – URBAN BIOGEOSCIENCE AND ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH APPLIED RESEARCH METHODS

    Graduate students work in groups on real-world environmental challenges related to urban Biogeoscience and Environmental Health. Students use applied research methods in collaboration with stakeholders from cities on issues related to air, soil, and/or water quality, environmental stressors, nutrient cycles, and climate. MORE

    SPH MC 725 – WOMEN, CHILDREN, AND ADOLESCENTS: A PUBLIC HEALTH APPROACH

    This course introduces students to the principles and practices of public health and maternal and child health. Using the life course perspective, the course examines how infants, children, women and families develop in the context of biologic and social determinants of health, as they play out over a lifetime and across generations. Selected current topics–such as asthma, adolescent pregnancy, infant mortality, and childhood obesity–are studied in depth and used to illustrate how problems are understood, their distribution in diverse populations, and the content and quality of programs required to address them. Throughout the course, special attention is given to the impact of poverty, poor access to health care, and racial inequalities on the health of families, as well as to the strengths that individuals and communities bring to the creation of solutions. By the end of the course students will be able to formulate an MCH-related public health question, conduct and write a literature review, and write a policy memo. MORE

    SPH MC 775 – SOCIAL JUSTICE/HEALTH OF POPULATIONS

    This course is focused on strengthening public health students’ knowledge, skills and ability to construct a critical appraisal of the determinants, distribution, causes, mechanisms, systems and consequences of health inequities. MORE

    SPH MC 786 – IMMIGRANT AND REFUGEE HEALTH

    This course focuses on low-income immigrants in the U.S. and applies a family and community health perspective to the study of their health and well-being. It begins with an overview of how political, economic, cultural factors at the global and local levels shape the migration patterns and health of immigrants and refugees. We then examine specific immigrant groups and health issues, with attention to interventions that engage community members in taking action. Students will gain critical skills in contextual analysis, community based participatory research, and project design. MORE

    SPH PH 510 – ESSENTIALS OF PUBLIC HEALTH

    Students will gain an understanding of public health as a broad, collective enterprise that seeks to extend the benefits of current biomedical, environmental, social, and behavioral knowledge in ways that maximize its impact on the health status of a population. The course will provide an overview of the public health approach including epidemiology, disease surveillance, sustainable solutions, social determinants of health, and disease prevention. Through active learning, students will learn skills in identifying and addressing an ever expanding list of health problems that call for collective action to protect, promote and improve our nation’s health, primarily through preventive strategies. Specific topics will include: food safety, toxics reduction, HIV/AIDS & COVID-19, vaccines, and tobacco control and prevention. PH510 is a requirement for obtaining an undergraduate minor in public health. It is appropriate for undergraduates and others who are not in an SPH degree program. It does not carry degree credit for MPH students. Effective Fall 2020, this course fulfills a single unit in each of the following BU Hub areas: Ethical Reasoning, Social Inquiry II, Critical Thinking. MORE

    SPH PH 719 – HEALTH SYSTEMS, LAW, AND POLICY

    This is a course about who gets what health services, when and how. Policies and laws governing what services are available and on what terms strongly influence health status at both the individual and population levels. This course examines the Constitutional, regulatory, political and socio-economic bases for the policies that determine access, quality, cost and equity in health services and population health programs. While the focus is principally on US examples, the course is structured on the World Health Organization’s framework for organizing and analyzing national health systems, covering governance, financing, delivery systems, workforce, and human and other resources. The course combines intensive individual preparation for each class using both written and video materials, interactive class presentations and hands-on individual and group projects in laboratory sessions. MORE

    SPH PH 853 – STRATEGIC PLANNING AND COMMUNICATIONS

    This course focuses on the development and implementation of program and policy interventions that can improve public health by modifying people’s health-related behaviors, and on the design and execution of effective oral and written communications to support those interventions. Working through a sequence of written assignments, students will develop: (1) a set of theory-based learning and environmental change objectives; (2) a strategic plan for a program or policy intervention designed to change an important health-related behavior; (3) a management plan for implementing and maintaining that intervention; (4) a supportive communication strategy; and (5) specific media and communications executions to operationalize that strategy. In class writing workshops and individual consultations are designed to give students ideas for their projects and interim feedback on their written assignments. MORE

    SPH PM 840 – ANALYSIS OF CURRENT HEALTH POLICY ISSUES

    The purpose of this course is to arm students with the skills to debate, define, and defend health policy proposals. We will explore, in depth, several current health policy problems. The course will take an analytic case approach, identifying policy options and tools, then gathering information and applying data to evaluate outcomes, costs; winners and losers. Methods for finding and accessing information on the Internet are emphasized. This is a capstone course meant to be taken in the student’s last semester. MORE

    SPH SB 818 – QUALITATIVE RESEARCH METHODS

    This course provides an introduction to the use of qualitative research methods in public health. Students will gain experience in the use and application of qualitative research methods including participant observation, in-depth and key informant interviewing, focus group discussions, systematic data collection, and document analysis. Students examine different qualitative methods and techniques and learn how they can be used alone or in conjunction with quantitative methods. The course also includes attention to topics such as validity and reliability, triangulation, operationalization, site and resource identification, sampling methods, framing questions, and interview design. The course includes some basic data analysis approaches. By the end of the course, students will have developed a brief research proposal on a topic of their choice that is based on preliminary research that students conduct throughout the course. MORE

    SPH SB 820 – ASSESSMENT AND PLANNING FOR HEALTH PROMOTION

    This course will introduce students to neighborhoods of Boston and provide opportunities for acquiring and practicing community assessment skills. We address the fundamental question: How do public health scientists and practitioners demonstrate that a health problem in a community warrants intervention? Students will learn to consult the literature, large data sets (such as the U.S. Census, hospitalization data, vital records, and national survey data) and geographic/mapping data, as well as conduct key informant interviews and site visits to assess health promotion needs and assets of a specific neighborhood and groups. The course will culminate in the production of a community needs assessment report integrating the various sources of data gathered over the course of the semester. MORE

    SSW SW 905 – CONTEMPORARY SOCIAL PROBLEMS: A SOCIAL WORK PERSPECTIVE

    SW905 is meant to act as an informal capstone experience for social work doctoral students. The class is to be taken in the fourth semester of full time study after students have completed their foundational learning at the School of Social Work as well as their methods and specialization courses in the greater University community. Given the topical and methodological diversity of the social work academic enterprise and the accompanying diversity in student research interests, the course has two over-arching aims: 1. To recognize the unique contributions of social work empirical research to the understanding of contemporary social problems; 2. To have students locate their own nascent research agendas among the diverse methods and topics that are currently characteristic of the field. MORE

    SSW WP 707 – SOCIAL WELFARE POLICY & PROBLEMS: A SOCIAL WORK PERSPECTIVE

    This course analyzes emerging issues and ideas about children and how these affect social policy and practice. It reviews major social and demographic changes in the family that affect the development of national policies designed to protect and provide for the care of children. The course emphasizes policies in such areas as income provisions, adoption, substitute care, neglect and abuse, social services, and employment.
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    Inequality/Poverty/Welfare

    CAS SO 242 – GLOBALIZATION AND WORLD POVERTY

    (Meets with CAS IR 242.) Globalization and world poverty; how and why over 80% of the world remains poor and inequality increases despite economic modernization and democratization. Addresses urbanization, immigration, religion, politics, development politics, foreign aid, women, drugs, environment, food security. Special attention to Latin American, African, and Asian experiences. Carries social science divisional credit in CAS. Effective Fall 2018, this course fulfills a single unit in each of the following BU Hub areas: Social Inquiry I, Ethical Reasoning. MORE

    SSW WP 701 – SOCIAL WELFARE POLICY II: CONTEMPORARY SOCIAL POLICY ANALYSIS

    This second-semester foundation course focuses principally on the study of urban poverty. Using a social problem/policy model, the course explores definitions, correlates, causes, and consequences of urban poverty. The same model is then used by students in exploring particular social problems and policies of interest to them. Particular emphasis is placed on analyzing current interventions and proposing means to improve policy intervention, including the contributions of social work. MORE

    Public Health

    SSW ET 753 – ETHICS AND THE SOCIAL WORK PROFESSION

    This required seminar is intended to inspire the moral imagination of social work students, and prepare them for competent and compassionate ethical practice as professionals. Ethics and the Social Work Profession (ET 753), examines the issues of social work professionalism, the process of becoming a social work professional, the tensions inherent in the goals of social work, and the ways these interrelate to produce conflicts of values and ethics in social work practice. The course focuses on acquiring and practicing the skills of ethical decision-making, including values clarification, application of ethical theory, utilization of codes of ethics, and models of ethical analysis. Both clinical and macro aspects of social work are explored, with an emphasis on the contemporary challenges of practice in multicultural and urban settings. Issues of self-care, impairment, licensure, malpractice, whistle-blowing and other professional challenges are explored. The course is set in the advanced curriculum as an integrative capstone, designed to be concurrent with the student’s final semester in the MSW program. MORE

    SAR HS 720 – LIFECOURSE APPROACH TO COMMUNITY NUTRITION

    This course will introduce students to nutrition in the community with special emphasis on the role of diet in the prevention of the major nutrition-related health problems in the U.S. Taught in the context of a public health model, this course will address the nutritional needs of individuals within specific subgroups of the population — infants, children, adolescents, adults, and older adults, with specific focus on nutritionally vulnerable segments of the population at each life stage including those who are urban, of low education and/or low SES, food insecure, pregnant/lactating women, and members of minority populations. The course will include the study of nutrition policy and community-based interventions targeting at-risk segments of the population to promote health and lower risks for chronic disease. MORE

    SED SE 250 – DISABILITY, EDUCATION, AND PUBLIC POLICY

    Students will examine how disabilities impact students, their families, and their educational/community participation; analyze the historical treatment of individuals with disabilities; discuss contemporary ethical issues; learn federal legislation; and develop a foundational understanding of inclusive educational practices. Effective Fall 2019, this course fulfills a single unit in the following BU Hub areas: The Individual in Community, Ethical Reasoning. MORE

    SSW SR 744 – SOCIAL WORK RESEARCH II

    Students are introduced to the concepts and procedures that are fundamental to both descriptive and inferential statistics. Empirical research examining the effectiveness of social work practice, particularly in the urban environment, is explored. Utilizing existing national data sets, students generate their own research hypotheses and then formulate and carry out an analytic strategy to answer these questions effectively. Emphasis is also placed on gaining skills in presenting and communicating key findings to relevant audiences and stakeholders. MORE

    Race/Ethnicity/Gender

    CAS AA 310 – HISTORY OF THE CIVIL RIGHTS MOVEMENT

    Through historical scholarship, oral history, documentary film, and excursions to local historic sites, this course explores how African Americans created a dynamic and multifaceted movement for civil and human rights from the 1950s to the present. Also offered as CAS HI 299. MORE

    CAS SO 207 – SOCIOLOGY OF RACE AND ETHNICITY

    This course examines the fundamental theoretical and empirical approaches regarding race/ethnicity and the current state of race relations in the U.S. that explore both contemporary social problems and the deep historical roots of those problems through a sociological lens. Carries social science divisional credit in CAS. Also offered as CAS SO 207. Effective Fall 2019, this course fulfills a single unit in each of the following BU Hub areas: Historical Consciousness, The Individual in Community, Research and Information Literacy. MORE

    CAS SO 211 – CONFRONTING RACIAL, CULTURAL, GENDER, AND SOCIAL IDENTITIES IN URBAN CLASSROOMS: EDUCATIONAL AND SOCIOLOGICAL PERSPECTIVES

    Examines the sociological, cultural, and educational factors that contribute to the achievement gap and what it will take to close this gap. Course is taught at the Trotter School; transportation provided. Includes a field placement. Effective Fall 2019, this course fulfills a single unit in the following BU Hub area: Global Citizenship and Intercultural Literacy. MORE

    CAS SO 335 – SOCIOLOGY OF RACE, CLASS, & GENDER

    Examines race, class, gender, and sexuality as intersecting axes of stratification, identity, and experience. No one of us is one thing, one identity, nor motivated by one singular interest, nor privileged or subjugated by one singular form of power, but how do those multiple forms of ourselves affect how we are advantaged, disadvantaged, viewed, and understood by the social world? Our social world, is, by default, a vast web of social intersections between and across groups with shared, overlapping, and conflicting identities. Race, class and gender affect nearly all of our lived experiences and greatly complicate and nuance concepts of diversity and difference. Also offered as CAS AA 335 and CAS WS 335. Effective Fall 2020, this course fulfills a single unit in each of the following BU Hub areas: Digital/Multimedia Expression, The Individual in Community, Historical Consciousness. MORE

    CAS SO 420 – SEMINAR: WOMEN AND SOCIAL CHANGE IN THE DEVELOPING WORLD

    Studies women in nonindustrial countries of Asia, Africa, and Latin America, stressing empirical research, theory, and methodology. Comparisons between regions and with industrial countries. Focus on sex segregation, female labor force participation, migration, fertility, family roles, and women and political power. Also offered as CAS IR 425. MORE

    SSW MP 759 – COMMUNITIES AND ORGANIZATIONS: ANALYSIS AND INTERVENTION

    A foundation course that provides an orientation to macro social work as a core method for all practitioners. Students learn a common framework and practical skills for planning and implementing change in communities and organizations. The course emphasizes principles including social and economic justice and empowerment through an examination of racism and other intersecting oppressions, constituent-led change efforts, and a strengths-based orientation to practice in urban settings and other social environments. MORE

    Urban Policy

    CAS EE 309 – INTERMEDIATE ENVIRONMENTAL ANALYSIS AND POLICY

    Introduction to economic and environmental theory critical to the formulation and evaluation of environmental resource policy. This theory is applied to real- world analysis of climate change, population growth, oil supplies, energy use, and globalization. MORE

    CAS PO 141 – INTRODUCTION TO PUBLIC POLICY

    Undergraduate core course. What are public policies? Where do they come from? What are their effects? In this course, we grapple with these questions. We also examine the question: how do the politics of public policy affect racial and economic inequality? Carries social science divisional credit in CAS. Effective Fall 2018, this course fulfills a single unit in each of the following BU Hub areas: Social Inquiry I, Critical Thinking. MORE

    CAS PO 399 – DATA SCIENCE FOR POLITICS

    Data science is changing how we understand and study politics, policy, and decision-making. This course introduces students to the fundamental tools of data science, including collecting, modeling, and visualizing data, and how to apply these tools to study political and policy questions. Effective Spring 2020, this course fulfills a single unit in each of the following BU Hub areas: Quantitative Reasoning I, Digital/Multimedia Expression. MORE

    GRS BI 795 – URBAN BIOGEOSCIENCE AND ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH: FROM RESEARCH TO POLICY

    Students learn how cities utilize scientific findings to address urban environmental challenges and develop communication skills to effectively translate scientific results to decision-makers and the public. Students complete a semester-long internship to gain experience applying scientific knowledge to decision making. MORE

    KHC EC 103 – HOUSING POLICY: AN ECONOMIC PRESPECTIVE

    This course introduces students to economic analysis through the study of housing policy. The course covers both microeconomic issues related to housing affordability and macroeconomic issues related to the stabilization of the housing market and the Great Recession. Throughout, the course will teach students economic principles and how use data to assess economic arguments. Effective Fall 2018, this course fulfills a single unit in each of the following BU Hub areas: Social Inquiry II, Quantitative Reasoning II, Research and Information Literacy. MORE

    MET UA 701 – URBAN PROBLEMS AND POLICY RESPONSES

    Major problems confronting urban areas and the process of policy formulation and implementation. Emphasis on problem interdependence and systems characteristics. Analysis of problem definitions (housing, crime, poverty, etc.), goals, public/private responsibilities, existing programs, and policy options. Analysis of selected, comparative international experience. MORE

    MET UA 715 – PLANNING AND LAND USE LAW

    Planning, zoning, subdivisions, eminent domain, exactions, impact fees, and other land use controls: what are they, how do they operate, what are the limitations on their use? In this course, we will explore the use of those tools for planning and development and read and understand the important U.S. Supreme Court and state court decisions that have shaped and continue to influence planning and land use throughout the country. We will see the connection between land use controls and court decisions and how each has evolved to meet changing conditions and goals. We will also review the structure of the U.S. legal system and create a framework for understanding constitutional requirements on eminent domain, due process, and equal protection from a planner’s perspective. MORE

    SPH PH 719 – HEALTH SYSTEMS, LAW, AND POLICY

    This is a course about who gets what health services, when and how. Policies and laws governing what services are available and on what terms strongly influence health status at both the individual and population levels. This course examines the Constitutional, regulatory, political and socio-economic bases for the policies that determine access, quality, cost and equity in health services and population health programs. While the focus is principally on US examples, the course is structured on the World Health Organization’s framework for organizing and analyzing national health systems, covering governance, financing, delivery systems, workforce, and human and other resources. The course combines intensive individual preparation for each class using both written and video materials, interactive class presentations and hands-on individual and group projects in laboratory sessions. MORE

    SPH PH 853 – STRATEGIC PLANNING AND COMMUNICATIONS

    This course focuses on the development and implementation of program and policy interventions that can improve public health by modifying people’s health-related behaviors, and on the design and execution of effective oral and written communications to support those interventions. MORE

    SPH PM 840 – ANALYSIS OF CURRENT HEALTH POLICY ISSUES

    The purpose of this course is to arm students with the skills to debate, define, and defend health policy proposals. We will explore, in depth, several current health policy problems. The course will take an analytic case approach, identifying policy options and tools, then gathering information and applying data to evaluate outcomes, costs; winners and losers. Methods for finding and accessing information on the Internet are emphasized. This is a capstone course meant to be taken in the student’s last semester. MORE

    SED SE 250 – DISABILITY, EDUCATION, AND PUBLIC POLICY

    Students will examine how disabilities impact students, their families, and their educational/community participation; analyze the historical treatment of individuals with disabilities; discuss contemporary ethical issues; learn federal legislation; and develop a foundational understanding of inclusive educational practices. Effective Fall 2019, this course fulfills a single unit in the following BU Hub areas: The Individual in Community, Ethical Reasoning. MORE

    SSW MP 781 – COMMUNITY ORGANIZING

    MP781 is designed to strengthen the ability of class members to foster progressive social change. It provides knowledge and skills in different models of community organizing, with a focus on collective action to promote social and economic justice, particularly in urban settings. Class members will develop skills in outreach and recruitment, leadership development, issue selection, strategy and tactics, campaign planning, coalitions, and building grassroots community organizations. MP781 emphasizes the responsibility of social workers to facilitate democratic participation and community empowerment based on respect, humility, and commitment to addressing racism and intersecting forms of oppression. In addition to readings and lectures, the course utilizes guest speakers, small group exercises, role play, video, poetry, music, and direct engagement with community-based organizations. Assignments emphasize skill building and integration of organizing theory and practice. The course relates community organizing to policy, planning, and management to underscore its relevance for all macro practitioners. MORE

    Urban Studies Minor

    CAS AA 310 – HISTORY OF THE CIVIL RIGHTS MOVEMENT

    Through historical scholarship, oral history, documentary film, and excursions to local historic sites, this course explores how African Americans created a dynamic and multifaceted movement for civil and human rights from the 1950s to the present. Also offered as CAS HI 299. MORE

    CAS AH 387 – BOSTON ARCHITECTURE AND URBANISM

    This class presents a history of Boston from the seventeenth through twenty- first centuries, as seen through the region’s architectural and urban history. Major buildings, architects, and urban planning schemes are examined in terms of economic, political, social, and institutional histories. Effective Summer 2020, this course fulfills a single unit in each of the following BU Hub areas: Social Inquiry I, Oral and/or Signed Communication, Teamwork/Collaboration. MORE

    CAS AN 309 – BOSTON: AN ETHNOGRAPHIC APPROACH (AREA)

    Using the tools of ethnographic practice, explores Boston’s multiple identities. Boston’s patterns of immigration and demographic change are mapped through fieldwork and historical documentation. On site observations will help students understand local meanings of place and community. MORE

    CAS BI 306 – BIOLOGY OF GLOBAL CHANGE

    The ecological impacts of human activity on terrestrial and aquatic ecosystems. Climate change, forest decline, eutrophication, acidification, loss of species diversity, and restoration of ecosystems. Three hours lecture, three hours lab. Effective Fall 2019, this course fulfills a single unit in each of the following BU Hub areas: Scientific Inquiry II, Ethical Reasoning, Research and Information Literacy. MORE

    CAS HI 440 – REFUGEE HOLLYWOOD (1933-1950)

    Examines the flight of artists, writers, and intellectuals from Germany to Los Angeles in the wake of Hitler’s rise to power with a focus on accounts by the emigres themselves, their works, and their influence on American culture. MORE

    CAS LS 576 – TOPICS IN SPANISH AMERICAN LITERATURE

    Topic for Spring 2021: After the Conquest: Literatures of Afro-Indo-Latin- America. Surveys the literary production of Colonial Latin America privileging the under-represented voices and discursive practices that contributed decisively to the formation of the region’s unique culture. MORE

    CAS PO 141 – INTRODUCTION TO PUBLIC POLICY

    Undergraduate core course. What are public policies? Where do they come from? What are their effects? In this course, we grapple with these questions. We also examine the question: how do the politics of public policy affect racial and economic inequality? Carries social science divisional credit in CAS. Effective Fall 2018, this course fulfills a single unit in each of the following BU Hub areas: Social Inquiry I, Critical Thinking. MORE

    CAS SO 207 – SOCIOLOGY OF RACE AND ETHNICITY

    This course examines the fundamental theoretical and empirical approaches regarding race/ethnicity and the current state of race relations in the U.S. that explore both contemporary social problems and the deep historical roots of those problems through a sociological lens. Carries social science divisional credit in CAS. Also offered as CAS SO 207. Effective Fall 2019, this course fulfills a single unit in each of the following BU Hub areas: Historical Consciousness, The Individual in Community, Research and Information Literacy. MORE

    CAS SO 211 – CONFRONTING RACIAL, CULTURAL, GENDER, AND SOCIAL IDENTITIES IN URBAN CLASSROOMS: EDUCATIONAL AND SOCIOLOGICAL PERSPECTIVES

    Examines the sociological, cultural, and educational factors that contribute to the achievement gap and what it will take to close this gap. Course is taught at the Trotter School; transportation provided. Includes a field placement. Effective Fall 2019, this course fulfills a single unit in the following BU Hub area: Global Citizenship and Intercultural Literacy. MORE

    CAS SO 242 – GLOBALIZATION AND WORLD POVERTY

    (Meets with CAS IR 242.) Globalization and world poverty; how and why over 80% of the world remains poor and inequality increases despite economic modernization and democratization. Addresses urbanization, immigration, religion, politics, development politics, foreign aid, women, drugs, environment, food security. Special attention to Latin American, African, and Asian experiences. Carries social science divisional credit in CAS. Effective Fall 2018, this course fulfills a single unit in each of the following BU Hub areas: Social Inquiry I, Ethical Reasoning. MORE

    CAS SO 244 – URBAN SOCIOLOGY

    An analysis of cities and urban phenomena in preindustrial, industrial, and postindustrial societies with an emphasis on European and U.S. urbanization. A comparison of social scientific theories used to explain urban dynamics, processes, and policies. Carries social science divisional credit in CAS. This course fulfills a single unit in each of the following BU Hub areas: Individual in Community, Critical Thinking, Social Inquiry I. MORE

    CAS SO 335 – SOCIOLOGY OF RACE, CLASS, & GENDER

    Examines race, class, gender, and sexuality as intersecting axes of stratification, identity, and experience. No one of us is one thing, one identity, nor motivated by one singular interest, nor privileged or subjugated by one singular form of power, but how do those multiple forms of ourselves affect how we are advantaged, disadvantaged, viewed, and understood by the social world? Our social world, is, by default, a vast web of social intersections between and across groups with shared, overlapping, and conflicting identities. Race, class and gender affect nearly all of our lived experiences and greatly complicate and nuance concepts of diversity and difference. Also offered as CAS AA 335 and CAS WS 335. Effective Fall 2020, this course fulfills a single unit in each of the following BU Hub areas: Digital/Multimedia Expression, The Individual in Community, Historical Consciousness. MORE

    MET CJ 352 – COURTS, SOCIETY, AND CRIMINAL PROCEDURE

    Federal, state, and local criminal courts and their relationship to contemporary social and political issues. Historical background of the current criminal court system. Institutional functions of the courts. Role of the courts in reducing crime. Judicial process and criminal procedure, case studies and court decisions. MORE

    MET CJ 511 – REHABILITATION AND RE-INTEGRATION

    Community re-integration following imprisonment has long been recognized as a significant problem. Longer sentences and rapid changes have created new problems for both returning inmates and those who provide services both inside and outside the criminal justice system. This course will examine rehabilitation philosophy in theory and practice. Lectures and seminars will address such issues as: the special problems in providing rehabilitation and education in the correctional system, the effect of inmate subculture on rehabilitation, and balancing demands for custody and rehabilitation. MORE

    MET MG 545 – INTRODUCTION TO AMERICAN MANAGEMENT, CULTURE AND INSTITUTIONS

    This course is intended primarily for international students to introduce them to American institutions — business, educational, and political in particular — within the context of American history, popular culture, and society. Students will learn about the unique features of American management and enterprise. The Boston metropolitan area will play an important role in appreciating the overall historical and cultural context, as will contemporary issues, scholarship, and unfolding events in illustrating distinctive features of American life and commerce. MORE

    MET UA 509 – PUBLIC FINANCE AND URBAN INFRASTRUCTURE

    Economic, social, and political aspects of state and local government finances. Theory of public finance; revenues, expenditures, and survey of budgetary processes. Planning techniques in capital budgeting and other finance activities. Selected issues: debt, user fees, property taxes, and incentives. MORE

    MET UA 510 – SELECTED TOPICS IN URBAN AFFAIRS

    For Spring 2021, the course is offering a special topic — New Trends in Transportation. More may be announced. MORE

    MET UA 654 – GEOGRAPHIC INFORMATION SYSTEMS FOR PLANNERS

    Geographic Information Systems for Planners provides an introduction to Geographic Information Systems (GIS) specifically with a focus on applications in urban planning. The role of spatial analysis in local, state and regional planning has steadily increased over the last decade with the infusion of windows-based GIS software such as ESRI ArcGIS. The class focus is to prepare students to feel comfortable communicating with other GIS users, research spatial data, and produce high quality digital maps in an applied learning environment. MORE

    MET UA 701 – URBAN PROBLEMS AND POLICY RESPONSES

    Major problems confronting urban areas and the process of policy formulation and implementation. Emphasis on problem interdependence and systems characteristics. Analysis of problem definitions (housing, crime, poverty, etc.), goals, public/private responsibilities, existing programs, and policy options. Analysis of selected, comparative international experience. MORE

    MET UA 704 – URBAN ECONOMICS

    This course provides basic understanding of economics and approaches urban problems and planning issues from economic perspectives. It explores how microeconomic theories and models can help us understand how cities and regions function, analyze urban problems, and evaluate urban policies. This is a broad introductory survey course, focusing on how “microeconomic” actors including business firms, households, and nonprofit and government institutions – organize to provide for the sustaining and flourishing of life. MORE

    MET UA 715 – PLANNING AND LAND USE LAW

    Planning, zoning, subdivisions, eminent domain, exactions, impact fees, and other land use controls: what are they, how do they operate, what are the limitations on their use? In this course, we will explore the use of those tools for planning and development and read and understand the important U.S. Supreme Court and state court decisions that have shaped and continue to influence planning and land use throughout the country. We will see the connection between land use controls and court decisions and how each has evolved to meet changing conditions and goals. We will also review the structure of the U.S. legal system and create a framework for understanding constitutional requirements on eminent domain, due process, and equal protection from a planner’s perspective. MORE

    SED ED 410 – SOCIAL CONTEXT OF EDUCATION

    How culture, race, language, poverty, social change, urban pressures, and rural isolation affect the work of schools and other educational institutions. MORE

    SED ED 412 – CIVIC CONTEXT OF EDUCATION

    Political and professional decision making in education in a democracy, emergent issues in educational policy, and the ethics of educational practice, based upon reading, discussion, planning exercises, and extensive writing by students. MORE