Quotes

First Herald
    Newes, newes, newes.
Second Herald
    Bold, and brave news!
1 Her.
    Newe as the night they are borne in;
2 Her.
    Or the Phant’sie that begot ’hem.
1 Her.
    Excellent newes!

—Ben Jonson, Newes from the New World

News

Presidential First Use of Nuclear Weapons: Is it Legal? Is it Constitutional? Is it Just?

May 8th, 2018

In light of Trump’s decision regarding the Iran nuclear deal, please take a look at this short video summarizing the Presidential First Use Conference, presented by the Mahindra Humanities Center late last year. Co-chair Elaine Scarry (Harvard) says it is especially relevant to share this video in the present moment as “it gives people a very concrete act they can carry out to diminish the chances that Trump will launch a nuclear missile.” This conference represents a growing trend among Humanities Centers to address issues of pressing public concern. The BU Center for Humanities will be hosting our own second public forum in the fall: Humanities Approaches to the Opioid Crisis. Elaine Scarry will participate as a panelist.

Professor Abigail Gillman Publishes “A History of German Jewish Bible Translation”

April 27th, 2018

gillmanCongratulations to Professor Abigail Gillman, Associate Professor of Hebrew, German & Comparative Literature in WLL, and a Jeffrey Henderson Senior Research Fellow in 14/15, on her newest publication: A History of German Jewish Bible Translation (The University of Chicago Press).

“This book is the first in English to offer a close analysis of German Jewish translations as part of a larger cultural project. Looking at four distinct waves of translations, Abigail Gillman juxtaposes translations within each that sought to achieve similar goals through differing means. As she details the history of successive translations, we gain new insight into the opportunities and problems the Bible posed for different generations and gain a new perspective on modern German Jewish history” (The University of Chicago Press).

Professor Fallou Ngom Awarded Herskovits Prize

April 2nd, 2018

 

ngom

Congratulations to Professor Fallou Ngom on being awarded the prestigious Melville J. Herskovits Prize! The Herskovits Prize is given to the most important scholarly work in African Studies published in English each year, and was awarded to Professor Ngom for his book, Muslims Beyond the Arab World: The Odyssey of Ajami and the Muridiyya (Oxford University Press). The book demonstrates how ‘Ajami materials serve as essential resources of indigenous religious, socio-cultural, and historical knowledge necessary for understanding the spread of Islam and its many adaptations in sub-Saharan Africa and the Muslim world at large, and explores the role that ‘Ajami materials played in the rise of the Muridiyya as one of the most resilient, dynamic, and influential Sufi movements in sub-Saharan Africa. Ngom is a professor of Anthropology, director of the African Studies Center at BU, and one of the members of the BUCH executive committee.

Battle of the Sexes Screening and Q&A

December 8th, 2017

We’d like to thank directors Valerie Faris and Jonathan Dayton for graciously taking the time to show us their new film Battle of the Sexes and talk with students about the film afterwards. It was a great discussion, and the audience learned a lot about filmmaking and the history behind the film. Students even got to star in a video greeting directed by Jonathan Dayton that was sent to Billie Jean King herself!

BOS1 BOS2 BOS3 BOS4

 

Boston University Welcomes Louis Chude-Sokei

November 30th, 2017

Sokei

Louis Chude-Sokei joined the Boston University faculty this fall. He is a Professor of English as well as the George and Joyce Wein Chair in African American Studies and the Director of the African American Studies Program.

Chude-Sokei is a writer and scholar whose work focuses on the literary, political, and cultural implications and ramifications of the African Diaspora. His work includes: The Last Darky: Bert Williams, Black on Black Minstrelsy and the African Diaspora (Duke University Press, 2006), The Sound of Culture: Diaspora and Black Technopoetics (Wesleyan University Press, 2016) and the forthcoming, Dr. Satan’s Echo Chamber and Other Essays (Wesleyan University Press). Also in progress is a memoir with Houghton Mifflin Harcourt that traces his intellectual development across multiple nations and distinct Black cultures. He is also active as the Editor in chief of The Black Scholar, one of the oldest and most prominent journals of Black Studies.

Chude-Sokei is proving himself to be an active and engaged scholar and member of the BU community. On December 8th, 2017 the African American Studies program will be hosting a symposium organized by Chude-Sokei. The event will focus on Race, Politics, and Social Media and brings together scholars in a series of discussions on the impact and consequences of race in social media and on corresponding attempts to deploy social media in anti-racist activism and politics. Featured speakers include Dr. Aleia Brown, Dr. Jacob Groshek, Dr. Robert Eschmann, Dr. Desmond Patton, and Feminista Jones.

BUCH Director Professor Susan Mizruchi Installed as William Arrowsmith Professor in the Humanities

November 15th, 2017

© Bryce Vickmark. All rights reserved. www.vickmark.com 617.448.6758

On November 21st, Center for the Humanities Director Professor Susan Mizruchi will be installed by Dean Ann Cudd as the inaugural William Arrowsmith Professor in the Humanities in an event celebrating the installment of five newly appointed CAS endowed chairs at the university.

The gift agreement with the Arrowsmith family states that “the William Arrowsmith Professor should be a person of clear vision of education that grows out of a mastery of a traditional scholarly discipline in classics or the humanities, a mastery demonstrated both in teaching and in publications.” In her letter to Professor Mizruchi, Dean Cudd noted: “Your distinguished career has produced a considerable body of scholarship at the intersection of social, religious, and literary studies, including five acclaimed books and many articles in leading peer-reviewed journals. You have also been awarded some of your field’s highest honors, including fellowships from the Guggenheim Foundation, the American Council of Learned Societies, the National Endowment for the Humanities, the Huntington Library, and the Fulbright Scholars Program. These achievements make you a very worthy inaugural holder of this distinguished chair.”

The titles of Professor Mizruchi’s books are: Brando’s Smile: His Life, Thought, and Work (Norton, 2015); The Rise of Multicultural America: Economy and Print Culture, 1865-1915 (UNC, 2008); Religion and Cultural Studies (Princeton, 2001); The Science of Sacrifice: American Literature and Modern Social Theory (Princeton, 1998); and The Power of Historical Knowledge: Narrating the Past in Hawthorne, James, and Dreiser (Princeton, 1985).

Fall 2017 CGS Poetry Reading Events

November 14th, 2017

The long-standing CGS Poetry Reading Series, which BU Center for the Humanities sponsors, presents the work of both renowned and emerging poets, and strives to make poetry a fundamental part of university and community life.

On October 24th, American poet Phyllis Levin read with Irish poet Peter McDonald. Levin shared her poems entitled An Anthology of Rain and Grace with the audience. McDonald, who teaches at Oxford University, shared his most recent volume of poetry, Herne the Hunter, as well as an unprecedented personal poem regarding the recent death of his mother.

Peter McDonald and Bonnie Costello Phillis Levin

On November 2nd, Justin Quinn, a renowned Irish poet and translator, read from his work. Quinn has authored six collections of poetry, and most recently has been at work on a translation of Czech poet Bohuslav Reynek’s selected poems, The Well at Morning. Quinn read both from his own poetry and from his translations, providing a good sense of the scope of his work.

Justin Quinn

 

View this post on Facebook here.

Goodbye to longtime Center for the Humanities administrator Christine Loken-Kim!

November 13th, 2017

chrisparty1 chrisparty2

 

We said goodbye last week to our much-beloved center administrator Christine Loken-Kim. Loken-Kim is retiring after being with the center for nine years, during which she ensured that BUCH ran smoothly and with the utmost efficiency and integrity. She was sent off in true Center for the Humanities fashion with a small party so that all of her friends and colleagues could let her know how much they appreciated the work she did and how much they will miss her presence at the university. We hope that she enjoys the sunny weather of her new home in Florida, and are pleased to announce that Loken-Kim has passed on her position as center administrator to Tamzen Flanders!

View this post on Facebook here.

 

 

Welcome, Dr. Xin Wei, to World Languages & Literatures and the BU Center for the Humanities!

October 13th, 2017

XinWei2

Dr. Xin Wei is joining the Department of World Languages and Literatures this year as the Korean Foundation Postdoctoral Fellow. The Center for the Humanities is happy to be able to provide her with office space during her Fellowship year. She completed her PhD in Oriental Studies at the University of Oxford, with a focus on Korea. After taking her undergraduate degree in China, she has had extensive experience studying and researching in Korea and Japan. Her work focuses on Korean hanmun literature delineated within a broader East Asian literary context. Her research interests include literary criticism, world literature, East Asian comparative literature, and the literary history of Korea. Her first book, co-authored with James B. Lewis, Korea’s Premier Collection of Classical Literature: Excerpts from Sŏ Kŏjŏng’s (1420-1488) Tongmunsŏn (forthcoming from Hawai’i UP, 2018) is part of the Korean Classics Library series, https://uhpress.wordpress.com/books-in-series/korea-classics-library/. She is currently preparing a book manuscript based on her PhD thesis, “The Literary Chinese Cosmopolis.” This research project, set against the backdrop of literary Chinese as the cosmopolitan written language across East Asia, examines two superlative literary Chinese writers of the ninth century, Ch’oe Ch’iwon from Silla Korea and Sugawara no Michizane from Heian Japan.

Dr. Xin Wei’s full profile can be viewed here

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Susan Mizruchi named William Arrowsmith Professor in the Humanities

July 24th, 2017

© Bryce Vickmark. All rights reserved. www.vickmark.com 617.448.6758

The Center for the Humanities is pleased to announce that our Director, Susan Mizruchi, has been named the inaugural William Arrowsmith Professor in the Humanities.

The gift agreement with the Arrowsmith family states that “the William Arrowsmith Professor should be a person of clear vision of education that grows out of a mastery of a traditional scholarly discipline in classics or the humanities, a mastery demonstrated both in teaching and in publications.” In her letter to Professor Mizruchi, Dean Cudd notes: “Your distinguished career has produced a considerable body of scholarship at the intersection of social, religious, and literary studies, including five acclaimed books and many articles in leading peer-reviewed journals. You have also been awarded some of your field’s highest honors, including fellowships from the Guggenheim Foundation, the American Council of Learned Societies, the National Endowment for the Humanities, the Huntington Library, and the Fulbright Scholars Program. These achievements make you a very worthy inaugural holder of this distinguished chair.”

The titles of Professor Mizruchi’s books are: Brando’s Smile: His Life, Thought, and Work (Norton, 2015); The Rise of Multicultural America: Economy and Print Culture, 1865-1915 (UNC, 2008); Religion and Cultural Studies (Princeton, 2001); The Science of Sacrifice: American Literature and Modern Social Theory (Princeton, 1998); and The Power of Historical Knowledge: Narrating the Past in Hawthorne, James, and Dreiser (Princeton, 1985).